Tate Britain

Tate Britain
baby changing facilities icon Food icon Guided tours icon Shop icon Library icon Study area icon Hearing disability facilities icon Visual disability facilities icon Wheelchair access icon

Tate Britain is the national gallery of British art from 1500 to the present day, from the Tudors to the Turner Prize.

Venue Type:

Gallery

Opening hours

Open everyday 10.00-17.50
Open until 22.00 on the first Friday of each month

Closed: 24, 25, 26 December

Admission charges

Entry is free except for major exhibitions

Discounts

  • International Council of Museums

Tate holds the greatest collection of British art in the world, including works by Blake, Constable, Epstein, Gainsborough, Gilbert & George, Hatoum, Hirst, Hockney, Hodgkin, Hogarth, Moore, Rossetti, Sickert, Spencer, Stubbs and Turner. The gallery is the world centre for the understanding and enjoyment of British art, and helps promote interest in British art internationally.

Collection details

Photography, Performing Arts, Fine Art, Film and Media, Archives

Key artists and exhibits

  • Blake
  • Constable
  • Epstein
  • Gainsborough
  • Gilbert & George
  • Hatoum
  • Hirst
  • Hockney
  • Hodgkin
  • Hogarth
  • Moore
  • Rossetti
  • Sickert
  • Spencer
  • Stubbs
  • Turner
Exhibition details are listed below, you may need to scroll down to see them all.
Lynette Yiadom-Boakye Elephant 2014

Lynette Yiadon-Boakye

  • 20 May — 31 August 2020 *on now

The first major survey of the celebrated London-based painter.

Widely considered to be one of the most important painters of her generation, Lynette Yiadom-Boakye is a British artist and writer acclaimed for her enigmatic portraits of fictitious people.

Her paintings often allude to historic European portraiture – notably Francisco de Goya, John Singer Sargent and Édouard Manet – yet in subject matter and technique her approach is decidedly contemporary. Through her focus on the depiction of imagined black characters Yiadom-Boakye’s paintings raise important questions of identity and representation.

This exhibition will bring together over 80 paintings and works on paper from 2003 to the present day in the most extensive survey of the artist’s career to date.

Yiadom-Boakye was awarded the prestigious Carnegie Prize in 2018 and was the 2012 recipient of the Pinchuk Foundation Future Generation Prize. She was shortlisted for the Turner Prize in 2013.

Admission

Please check website for booking information

Website

https://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-britain/exhibition/lynette-yiadom-boakye

inside Tate Britain

Tate Britain Commission: Heather Phillipson

  • 16 June — 18 October 2020 *on now

Tate Britain’s central galleries will be transformed again by a large-scale immersive art work.

Every year Tate Britain invites an artist to create an exciting new commission for the grand spaces of the Duveen Galleries at the heart of the building. In 2020 the commission will be by British artist Heather Phillipson.

Previous artists have included Mark Wallinger, Martin Creed, Fiona Banner, Simon Starling, Phyllida Barlow, Pablo Bronstein, Cerith Wyn Evans, Anthea Hamilton and Mike Nelson.

Website

https://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-britain/exhibition/heather-phillipson

John Gay A young man at Speaker’s Corner in Hyde Park, London. 1960–1962

After Empire: Photographing Britain Around the World

  • 30 June — 27 September 2020 *on now

Powerful and poignant photographs tell the story of modern Britain and its changing place in the world.

This exhibition explores documentary photography from the end of the Second World War to the election of Margaret Thatcher in 1979.

This 35-year period was a time of hope and change for many as Europe’s empires collapsed in Africa and Asia. It was a time of painful struggle and new oppressions during the Civil Rights and Cold War era. Britain was changed profoundly – reshaped by immigration and deindustrialisation at home; and by the struggle for political independence abroad.

The post-war period was also a golden age for photography in Britain: it marked the apogee of the illustrated press with magazines such as Picture Post and the Sunday Times Magazine, the birth of the first independent agency Magnum in 1947, and the emergence of documentary photographers working with a new artistic freedom.

This exhibition brings together the work of photographers who captured these turbulent times – from the Korean War to the Winter of Discontent. It includes some of the biggest names in 20th century photography as well as lesser-known photographers. It will be a moving and unforgettable journey through events which have shaped what Britain is today.

Admission

Please check website for booking information

Website

https://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-britain/exhibition/after-empire

Joseph Mallord William Turner, Rain, Steam and Speed

Turner's Modern World

  • 28 October 2020 — 7 March 2021

How J.M.W. Turner broke with convention to paint the times in which he lived.

One of Britain’s greatest artists, J.M.W. Turner lived and worked at the peak of the industrial revolution. Steam replaced sail; machine-power replaced manpower; political and social reforms transformed society.

Many artists ignored these advances but Turner faced up to these new challenges. This exhibition will show how he updated the language of art to produce revelatory interpretations of modern subjects.

Beginning in the 1790s, when Turner first observed the effects of modern life, the exhibition will follow his fascination for new industry and technology through to his famous paintings of steam boats and railway engines of the 1840s. It also looks at his engagement with the Napoleonic War and the other major political events of his lifetime, including the 1832 Reform Act and the campaign against slavery.

This landmark exhibition will bring together major works by Turner from around the world, including The Fighting Temeraire 1839 and Rail, Steam and Speed 1844. It will explore what it meant to be a modern artist in his lifetime and present an exciting new perspective on his work and life.

Admission

Please check website for booking information

Website

https://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-britain/exhibition/turners-modern-world

Resources listed here may include websites, bookable tours and workshops, books, loan boxes and more. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all.

My Imaginary City

http://kids.tate.org.uk/games/my-imaginary-city/

Artists use their imaginations to create scenes and places that are not real and that might never exist. If you could invent your own imaginary city what would it be like?

Schools and Teachers

http://www.tate.org.uk/schoolsteachers/

All the resources you need for teaching art in the classroom, from Teachers' Packs to teacher training.

Tate Webquests

http://nmolp.tate.org.uk/webquests/

Webquests are online activities for children, using the collections of nine national museums and galleries.

The Case of the Mysterious Object

http://www.tate.org.uk/detective/mysteriousobject.htm

The Silver Cage: Film

http://kids.tate.org.uk/films/film1.shtm

Inspired by Cornelia Parker's 'Thirty Pieces of Silver', the Art Sparks create their own work, 'The Silver Cage'. Watch the film to see what they did.

How to obtain

View online on the Tate Kids site.

The Zoom Room

http://www.tate.org.uk/schoolsteachers/zoomroom/

Welcome to the Zoom Room, where you can zoom into fresh ideas for making art. The Zoom Room contains an archive of informal art activities carried out by children in the Tate galleries. Get new ideas for making collages, creating snow globes, putting on performances, or carving soap sculptures. Tips are provided for children, explaining how to carry out these activities in the classroom or at home.

Tate Britain
Millbank
London
Greater London
SW1P 4RG
England

logo: Museums at Night

Website

http://www.tate.org.uk/britain

E-mail

visiting.britain@tate.org.uk

Telephone

Switchboard

020 7887 8888

Recorded information

020 7887 8008

MIincom

020 7887 8687

Events and education

020 7887 8888

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
advertisement