The Wiener Library

Photograph of the Reading Room in the Library
Guided tours icon Library icon Study area icon Hearing disability facilities icon Wheelchair access icon

The Wiener Library for the Study of the Holocaust & Genocide is one of the world's leading and most extensive archives on the Holocaust and Nazi era. The Library's unique collection of over one million items includes published and unpublished works, press cuttings, photographs and eyewitness testimony. It provides a resource to oppose antisemitism and other forms of prejudice and racism.

Venue Type:

Library, Archive, Museum

Opening hours

Monday to Friday 10.00-17.00
Tuesday 10.00-19.30

Closed: Bank Holidays
First day of Rosh Hashanah
First day of Yom Kippur
Christmas & New Year

Admission charges

Free entry to the public.
Photo ID and proof of address/letter of introduction required on first visit.
Only Members or Friends of the Library are permitted to borrow books.

Getting there

By tube:
• Russell Square (Piccadilly line)
• Goodge Street (Northern line)
• St Pancras International (Metropolitan, Northern, Circle, Victoria and Hammersmith & City lines)

By bus:
The following buses stop nearby:
7, 59, 68, X68, 91, 168, 188

Access:
In 2011 the Library moved to new premises in a historic location in Russell Square.
• There is a disabled lift outside of the building, and once inside the building, all floors are accessible via the indoor lift.
• There are adapted toilets on the basement level.
• The nearest step-free underground station is King’s Cross, St Pancras.

The Wiener Library collects material related to the Holocaust, its causes and legacies. The Library has holdings of approx 65,000 items searchable online including books, pamphlets, periodicals and documents. The collection includes rare eye-witness accounts and an extensive press cuttings archive. The Library holds a photo archive of over 10,000 images, in the process of being digitised and made accessible through the website. Up to one third of the collection contains pre-war material and the Library continues to add to its collections.

Collection details

Archives, Photography, Religion, Social History, World Cultures

Exhibition details are listed below, you may need to scroll down to see them all.
The businessman Ludwig Neumann was arrested and deported to Dachau shortly after Kristallnacht. This image was taken after his release in 1938.

SHATTERED: Pogrom, November 1938

  • 3 October 2018 — 15 February 2019 *on now

Thousands of Jewish women, men and children brutalised. 25,000 Jewish men deported to concentration camps. Over 1,200 synagogues desecrated. Thousands of Jewish businesses and homes looted and destroyed. Over 100 Jews murdered.

The events of 9-10 November 1938, commonly called Kristallnacht, are the focus of The Wiener Library’s new temporary exhibition. Eighty years on, this exhibition explores exactly how the brutal events unfolded.

Through the eyewitness accounts gathered shortly after Kristallnacht, the exhibition examines responses to this unprecedented, nation-wide campaign of violence. Never-before-seen documents from the Library’s collection demonstrate German and Austrian Jews’ desperate attempts to flee, in many cases as refugees to Britain.

Newly curated by Dr Christine Schmidt and Dr Barbara Warnock, Shattered explores the experiences of Jewish women, men and children whose lives were changed forever after November 1938.

Admission

Free admission

Website

https://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/SHATTERED

Events details are listed below. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all. For events that don't have a specific date see the 'Resources' tab above.
Exhibition sponsored by the World Jewish Congress on efforts to trace survivors of the Holocaust and reunite families, July 1945

Early Postwar Holocaust Knowledge and Jewish Missing Persons

  • 21 November 2018 3-4pm

Jewish missing person searches in the first years after World War II offer a unique pathway for understanding what Jews both in Europe and further afield actually understood about the Nazi-era camp system, deportation process, ghettos and killing operations in eastern Europe. The correspondence sent to postwar Jewish community offices and organisations reveals highly fragmentary knowledge about wartime events, both on the part of far-flung refugees and the officials who attempted to assist them. Many of these searches ended in grief but many more in 'no information located'. As a result, Jewish tracing enquiries continued to be made for years after the war and were only halted with reluctance. Some family survivors eventually did seek declarations of death for relatives who had not returned. International law experts' discussions of the hurdles for certifying Jewish 'legal death' further demonstrate the very limited ways in which the details of the Holocaust were understood in the latter half of the 1940s.

Admission

Free admission, registration essential

Website

https://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/Whats-On?item=420

Paul Samuel Blach and Hedwig Wertheim with their children Cornelia and Rudolph, who came to Britain on the Kindertransport in 1938.

Memorial Concert for the 80th Anniversary of the Kindertransport

  • 22 November 2018 6:30-9pm

The Wiener Library is delighted to announce details of a special memorial concert to mark the 80th anniversary of Kristallnacht and the Kindertransport. The concert will take place in the beautiful sanctuary of the Liberal Jewish Synagogue, London, on 22 November 2018, one day after the official anniversary of the Kindertransport debate in Parliament.

The evening will begin with a drinks reception at 6.30pm, with special guests, including Dame Esther Rantzen DBE. The concert that follows will consist of an exclusive, one-off performance by two acclaimed German musicians who have come specially for this occasion: cellist Friederike Fechner, and composer, conductor and pianist Mathias Husmann.

The performance promises to be particularly poignant as Friederike Fechner has recently helped to reunite the descendants of the Blach family, originally of Stralsund, through her research. Multiple branches of the Blach family were torn apart by Nazi persecution, and many members of the family did not survive the Holocaust. Two of the children, Cornelia and Rudolph, survived by coming to Britain on the Kindertransport. Another descendant, AJR trustee Gaby Glassman, is co-organising this special evening.

Where

Liberal Jewish Synagogue
St John's Wood Road
London
NW8 7HA

Admission

£30

Website

https://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/Whats-On?item=410

Resources listed here may include websites, bookable tours and workshops, books, loan boxes and more. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all.

Online Learning Materials

http://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/wls.aspx

A selection of the Wiener Library's unique stories and materials are now remotely accessible to anyone who wishes to learn more about the Holocaust and the Nazi era. The site allows users to trace different topics interactively, as well as providing background information on connected themes. The materials currently include detailed information on 'Childhood under the Swastika', 'Helping the Survivors' and the fascinating story of German-Jewish factory owner Ludwig Neumann.

Creator

  • The Wiener Library

How to obtain

The Wiener Library Learning Materials are freely accessible to everyone via the Wiener Library website.

Getting there

By tube:
• Russell Square (Piccadilly line)
• Goodge Street (Northern line)
• St Pancras International (Metropolitan, Northern, Circle, Victoria and Hammersmith & City lines)

By bus:
The following buses stop nearby:
7, 59, 68, X68, 91, 168, 188

Access:
In 2011 the Library moved to new premises in a historic location in Russell Square.
• There is a disabled lift outside of the building, and once inside the building, all floors are accessible via the indoor lift.
• There are adapted toilets on the basement level.
• The nearest step-free underground station is King’s Cross, St Pancras.

The Wiener Library
29 Russell Square
London
Greater London
WC1B 5DP
England

Website

http://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk

E-mail

info@wienerlibrary.co.uk

Telephone

020 7636 7247

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
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