The Barber Institute of Fine Arts

The Barber Institute of Fine Arts
University of Birmingham
Edgbaston
Birmingham
B15 2TS
England

Website

www.barber.org.uk

E-mail

General information

info@barber.org.uk

Telephone

0121 414 7333

Fax

0121 414 3370

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
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Monet, Manet, and Magritte; Renoir, Rubens, Rossetti and Rodin; Degas, Delacroix and van Dyck — not to mention Turner, Gainsborough, Gauguin, van Gogh and Picasso…

You can see major works by all these great artists in the Barber Institute of Fine Arts, at the University of Birmingham. There’s also a stunning coin gallery and an exciting programme of exhibitions, concerts, lectures, gallery talks, workshops and family activities.

The entire collection of the Barber Institute of Fine Arts is a Designated Collection of national importance.

Venue Type:

Gallery

Opening hours

Monday - Saturday: 10.00 am - 5.00 pm
Sunday: 12 noon - 5.00 pm

Closed: 1 January, 2 April (Good Friday), 24-26 December.

Admission charges

Admission to the permanent collection and all exhibitions is free.

Additional info

Our prints and drawings collection is available for viewing by appointment.

The entire collection of the Barber Institute of Fine Arts is a Designated Collection of national importance.

The Barber Institute houses one of the finest small collections of European art in the whole of the United Kingdom, featuring works ranging from the 13th to the 20th centuries. The holdings are a gathering of some of the most influential artists of the previous millennium, with particular strengths lying in the Old Master and Impressionist collections.

The collection is made up of paintings, drawings, prints and sculpture, and among the artists represented are Bellini, Botticelli, Veronese, Rubens, Van Dyck, Rembrandt, Poussin, Gainsborough, Turner, Delacroix, Ingres, Rossetti, Whistler, Manet, Degas, Monet, van Gogh, Rodin, Gauguin, Picasso, Matisse, Magritte, and Schiele. The Barber Institute also houses a rare collection of coins, seals and weights, chiefly from Rome, Byzantium and the Middle East.

Collection details

Weapons and War, Fine Art, Decorative and Applied Art, Costume and Textiles, Coins and Medals

Key artists and exhibits

  • Designated Collection
Exhibition details are listed below, you may need to scroll down to see them all.
CRW Nevinson, A Star Shell, c. 1916

Rebel Visions: The War Art of CRW Nevinson

  • 24 October 2014 — 25 January 2015 *on now

Famous for his dramatic, often haunting images of the battlefield and its soldiers, Richard Nevinson's arresting paintings, drawings and posters also acknowledged the sometimes unpalatable effects war had on British society. Always a rebel, he produced work that ranged in variety from official war propaganda to anti-war condemnation - some of which was censored. With major paintings, key drawings and major prints lent by private and public collections, including Tate, the Imperial War Museum and the British Museum, the exhibition is also accompanied by a full programme of exciting events.

Suitable for

  • 14-15
  • 18+
  • 16-17
  • 11-13

Website

http://barber.org.uk/rebel-visions-2/

Gods & Heroes

  • 23 January — 25 May 2015

Epic ambitions underpin this display inspired by Hercules and Caucus, the magnificent chiaroscuro woodcut by Hendrick Goltzius, recently acquired for the gallery.

Gods and Heroes includes prints after Titian, Michelangelo and Rubens, featuring subjects drawn from both ancient mythology and the Judo-Christian tradition. It seeks to uncover the methods and motives behind the representation of the superhuman and supernatural in art.

Website

http://barber.org.uk/gods-heroes/

Revolutionising Fashion

  • 6 February — 26 April 2015

The frivolous and extravagant fashions of the Ancien Regime were brought to a swift and bloody end at the onset of the French Revolution in 1789.

In the ensuing years, a taste for simpler, classically inspired clothing migrated across from Revolutionary France into Britain. This display explores the depiction of fashionable dress in an array of elegant 18-th and early 19-th century British miniatures by the likes of Richard Cosway, George Engleheart and John Smart. On loan from two outstanding private collections, these delicate little paintings are complemented by prints from the Barber’s own collection.

Website

http://barber.org.uk/god-heroes/

New Art West Midlands

  • 13 February — 17 May 2015

Voyeurism, idolatry, the transience of life and orange-phobia are among the diverse subjects and themes explored in this year’s New Art West Midlands.

Created in a wide range of media – including oil, acrylic, photography , found objects, textiles and boiled sweets – this multi-site, selective award exhibition showcases work by emerging local artists. The third in a collaborative annual series, New Art West Midlands 2015 presents some of the best, critically engaged work by recent graduates from the five West Midlands university art schools. Works are displayed in the dedicated exhibition space and as thought-provoking interventions among the Barber’s permanent collection.

Website

http://barber.org.uk/new-art-west-midlands-3/

Inheriting Rome

  • 27 February 2015 — 24 January 2016

The Imperial Legacy in Coinage and Culture

Look at one of the coins you’re carrying today: you’ll see the Queen’s portrait facing right and Latin script around the royal head.

It seems our coins have looked this way forever - and that’s nearly true. But why? This exhibition uses money to explore and question our deep-seated familiarity with the Roman Empire’s imagery. Britain is not the only nation, empire or state to channel ancient Rome in this way: the Barber’s excellent collection of coins from the Byzantine Empire – as well as examples from Hungary, Georgia and Armenia – illustrate both the problems and possibilities of being genuine heirs of Rome.

Attempting to uncover the political uses of Rome’s legacy, this exhibition encourages the visitor to ponder why we are so often told of the empire’s importance – and whose interests such imagery serves.

Website

http://barber.org.uk/inheriting-rome/

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