Royal Cornwall Museum

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Discover Cornwall’s unique culture from the ancient past to the present day along with art and artefacts from around the world. Explore magnificent minerals, archaeology and natural history, along with our impressive collection of Newlyn School paintings, old masters and decorative art. Family trails & activities, talks and lectures occur throughout the year along with a full programme of exciting exhibitions.

Venue Type:

Museum, Gallery, Library

Opening hours

Open 10:00am - 4.45pm Tuesday - Sunday

Closed Mondays*
*open 7 days a week in school holidays

Admission charges

Adults: £5.50 for a day pass (tickets include a £1 voluntary donation) , Children (16 and under) Free.

Discounts

  • Museums Association
  • National Art Pass
Getting there

By Rail: Mainline to Truro and then 10 minutes walk down the hill, the museum will be on your left.

By Car: To the Park and Ride at Threemilestone and then get the P&R Bus whcich drops off and picks up right outside the museum.

By Bus: First Buses and Western Greyhound all drop off and pick up outside the museum. The main Bus Station at Lemon Quay is 10 minutes walk away.

Additional info

Facilities and Access:
Wheelchair accessible toilets and nappy changing facilities, shop, cafe, ramp and lift.

The Royal Institution of Cornwall has been responsible for a museum since its inception. The diverse collections it has acquired over the years are held within the Courtney Library & Archive and the Royal Cornwall Museum. The majority of collections relate mainly to Cornwall, but there are others from the rest of the UK and abroad.

The Courtney Library & Archive holds books, periodicals, archive material and ephemera relating to Cornwall and the South West of England. In addition, there is an extensive photographic collection which records the history of Cornwall from 1845 to date.

The Royal Cornwall Museum holds collections of Cornish & European archaeology and social history, as well as world cultures. The fine and decorative art collections hold work by Cornish artists, designers and makers but also contain significant works by nationally and internationally important artists from other parts of the world. The geology and flora & fauna of the South West of England are represented in the geological and biological collections and are complimented by UK and world material.

Collection details

Archaeology, Decorative and Applied Art, Fine Art, Industry, Natural Sciences, Social History, World Cultures

Exhibition details are listed below, you may need to scroll down to see them all.
Jubilee Lantern Procession

Hireth- A Cornish Landscape

  • 29 March — 30 December 2017 *on now

This exhibition gathers together a wide selection of work by artists who have been inspired by the land and seascapes of Cornwall. The exhibition largely shows work from the museum’s collection but also takes the opportunity to showcase pieces from Cornwall Council’s Schools Art Collection.

The exhibition’s curator, Michael Harris, speaking about the show said that “the word Hireth comes from the Cornish language describing a longing for familiarity and the comfort of home. This concept is illustrated through a wide range of different artists who have been able to capture and brilliantly communicate the emotion of Cornwall’s land and seascapes.”

Included in the exhibition is sculpture by Barbara Hepworth, painting by Paul Feiler, Alfred Wallis, L S Lowry, and Penzance born Margo Maeckelberghe, as well as a newly restored work by 19th century Newlyn School artist John Noble Barlow. There are also selections of Alec Walker’s Cryséde textiles.

Suitable for

  • Any age

Admission

Under 16’s go FREE.
Adults: £5.50 for a day pass (tickets include a £1 voluntary donation).

Website

http://www.royalcornwallmuseum.org.uk/visiting-us

Helen Marton Pot

4000 Years in the Making

  • 14 October — 30 December 2017

Through this contemporary craft exhibition artist Helen Marton endeavours to communicate archaeology in a unique way. The works on display respond directly to significant archaeological finds discovered at Tremough in Penryn, Cornwall.

Several of the objects found at the site will be on display alongside distinctive hybrid craftworks where Helen uses a range of traditional and digital techniques to explore the archaeology of the site. Her works reveal much about the use of technologies over time, whilst provoking insights into the lives of our prehistoric ancestors.

Suitable for

  • Any age

Admission

Under 16’s go FREE.
Adults: £5.50 for a day pass (tickets include a £1 voluntary donation).

Website

http://www.royalcornwallmuseum.org.uk/exhibition/4000-years-making

Events details are listed below. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all. For events that don't have a specific date see the 'Resources' tab above.
New for Autumn

From the Congo to Cornwall:A Geologist’s Journey from Fact to Fiction

  • 28 September 2017 6-7pm

Ken McKechnie is a geologist and novelist. For 35 years he explored some of world’s most remote regions, mining precious metals, gold and diamonds. His writing is inspired by the extraordinary men and women he worked with, and the rugged landscapes he worked in. His latest novel, The Boy in the Dark, is set in mid-nineteenth century Cornwall. His illustrated talk centres on the lives of Cornish miners illuminated by his own experience.

Suitable for

  • 18+
  • 16-17
  • 14-15

Admission

£ 4 Members , £7 Non-Members , FREE for 14-18 yr olds and the unemployed

Website

http://www.royalcornwallmuseum.org.uk/whats-on/lecture-series

Helen Marton recreated bronze age pot

Tremough: A Site of Making New Ways of Seeing-Communicating Archaeology

  • 20 October 2017 6-7pm

This lecture will give a detailed account of Helen's long-standing relationship with Gabbroic clay and the Royal Cornwall Museum. She will also discuss her current exhibition, which highlights and engages with the archaeology from Tremough in Penryn, Cornwall.

Suitable for

  • 14-15
  • 16-17
  • 18+

Admission

Free admission for Friends and Members of the Royal Cornwall Museum
£4 for Non-Members

Website

http://www.royalcornwallmuseum.org.uk/whats-on/ric-autumn-lecture

New for Autumn

Coastal Heritage risk – Imagery in Support of Heritage Management In South-West England (CHeRISH)

  • 26 October 2017 6-7pm

A new study exploring the role that historical imagery can fulfill in support of managing heritage at risk around the coastline of south-west England has just be published. The CHeRISH study was commissioned by Historic England from Professor Robin McInnes OBE FRSA, a coastal scientist and art historian. The study findings, which are drawn from 23 case studies in the south-west, demonstrate the usefulness of artworks, early photographs and postcards (1770-1950) in terms of heritage management in a changing climate.

Robin McInnes OBE FICE FGS FRSA Geologist, Coastal Scientist, Art Historian and Author. For 10 years Robin chaired the Coastal Defence Groups of England and Wales. He was appointed OBE for ‘Services to Flood and Coastal Defence’ in 2006. He is managing consultant of Isle of Wight-based consultancy Coastal & Geotechnical Services.

Suitable for

  • 14-15
  • 16-17
  • 18+

Admission

£ 4 Members , £7 Non-Members , FREE for 14-18 yr olds and the unemployed

Website

http://www.royalcornwallmuseum.org.uk/whats-on/lecture-series

New for Autumn

The Library at Lanhydrock House and the Court of King Henry VIII

  • 24 November 2017 6-7pm

This talk will discuss three books in the library at Lanhydrock House associated with the court of King Henry VIII. The first two are manuscripts deriving from his library at Westminster. Containing works by William of Ockham (d. 1347), they represent part of the campaign leading to the break with Rome in 1534 and one has annotations relating to this campaign.

The third is the unique printed copy of an epitalamion written by Jean Mallard, ‘orator in the French tongue’ to Henry VIII to celebrate the marriage of Francis, duc de Bar, to Christine of Denmark, niece of Charles V, on 10 July 1541. It seems likely that this book also comes from the royal library and got to Lanhydrock by the same route as the other two, but how it came to Henry VIII’s library is somewhat of a mystery since Mallard seems to have left the service of the English king by 1541.

Suitable for

  • 14-15
  • 16-17
  • 18+

Admission

£ 4 Members , £7 Non-Members , FREE for 14-18 yr olds and the unemployed

Website

http://www.royalcornwallmuseum.org.uk/whats-on/lecture-series

Resources listed here may include websites, bookable tours and workshops, books, loan boxes and more. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all.
Mother and daughter with explorer pack.

Explorer Backpacks

http://www.royalcornwallmuseum.org.uk

Discover the museum with a backpack and pith helmet. Role the dice and explore with binoculars, tape measure and compass. Log your finds in your explorer log book.

Creator

  • This pack was created by the RIC's Learning Team.

How to obtain

Visit the museum and you may borrow a pack and pith helmet for the duration of your visit.

Getting there

By Rail: Mainline to Truro and then 10 minutes walk down the hill, the museum will be on your left.

By Car: To the Park and Ride at Threemilestone and then get the P&R Bus whcich drops off and picks up right outside the museum.

By Bus: First Buses and Western Greyhound all drop off and pick up outside the museum. The main Bus Station at Lemon Quay is 10 minutes walk away.

Royal Cornwall Museum
River Street
Truro
Cornwall
TR1 2SJ
England

Website

Website

www.royalcornwallmuseum.org.uk

E-mail

enquiries@royalcornwallmuseum.org.uk

Telephone

01872 272205

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
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