Handel House Museum

Handel House Museum
25 Brook Street
Mayfair
London
Greater London
W1K 4HB
England

Website

www.handelhouse.org

E-mail

mail@handelhouse.org

Telephone

Information

020 7495 1685

Fax

020 7495 1759

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
Handel House Museum
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Handel House Museum at 25 Brook Street, London was home to the great baroque composer George Frideric Handel. He lived here from 1723 until his death in 1759, and composed some of the greatest music in history, including 'Messiah', 'Zadok the Priest' and 'Music for the Royal Fireworks'. Handel House is brought to life with regular live music, exhibitions and talks.

Incidentally 23 Brook Street, now part of the museum, was home to rock legend Jimi Hendrix from 1968-69. A blue plaque commemorate his time there.

Venue Type:

Museum

Opening hours

Tuesday-Saturday 10am-6pm (8pm on Thursday), Sunday 12pm-6pm. Last admission is 30 minutes before closing. Closed on Mondays and Bank Holidays

Admission charges

£6.50 Adults, £5.50 Concessions, £2.00 Children (5-16 years). Children free entry on Saturdays and Sundays.

Discounts

  • National Trust
Getting there

Entrance to the museum is round the back of 25 Brook Street in Lancashire Court.
Nearest tube stations are Bond Street and Oxford Circus and there are numerous buses to Oxford Street, Bond Street and Regent Street.

Portraits of Handel and his contemporaries, early Georgian furniture, musical instruments, manuscripts.

Collection details

Fine Art, Music, Performing Arts

Key artists and exhibits

  • Hudson, Mercier, Nazari
Exhibition details are listed below, you may need to scroll down to see them all.
photograph of handel house museum

She Was Despiséd: Handel and Susannah Cibber

  • 26 February — 28 September 2014 *on now

From a promising start as a singer in a small opera company, Cibber’s career and social standing were fatally blighted by the scandalous trial in which her husband Theophilus accused her of adultery. Unable to appear on the London stage, she fled to Dublin. It was here that she was chosen by Handel to sing in the first performance of Messiah in 1742, giving a moving performance of the aria ‘He was despiséd’.

From her performance in the London premiere of Messiah a year later her career blossomed once again. She became one of the most significant actresses of the 18th century, and for many years was David Garrick’s leading lady.

The exhibition will tell Susannah’s fascinating, dramatic and moving life story, through exhibits, contemporary texts, music and a programme of related events.

Exhibition Talks are delivered by volunteers and are suitable for all levels of knowledge. Talks will last between 15-20 minutes and will take place on Saturday 29 March and Saturday 26 April.

Suitable for

  • Any age

Admission

£6.50 adults
£5.50 concessions
£2.00 children (5-16 years). Children FREE ENTRY on Saturdays and Sundays.

Website

http://www.handelhouse.org/whats-on/exhibitions/susannah-cibber

Events details are listed below. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all. For events that don't have a specific date see the 'Resources' tab above.
photograph from RNIB composition chowcase at Handel House Museum

RNIB Composition Summer School showcase

  • 31 July 2014 6:30-7:30pm

Musicians
Aisha Orazbayeva (violin)
Lucy Railton (Cello)
Cavanne Horrocks-Hopayian (Composer-in-Residence)

Composers
Aisha Orazbayeva (violin)
Lucy Railton (Cello)
Cavanne Horrocks-Hopayian (Composer-in-Residence)


Desription
This concert is the culmination of a four day Summer School for composers who are blind or partially sighted. In collaboration with the RNIB, the Handel House Composer-in-Residence works closely with these talented young musicians to create pieces influenced by both modern and baroque idioms. These compositions will be composed for and premiered by violin and cello duo Aisha Orazbayeva (violin) and Lucy Railton (cello) in Handel's Rehearsal and Performance Room.

Suitable for

  • Any age

Admission

£9 Adults
£5 Students

Website

http://www.handelhouse.org/whats-on/concerts-and-events/rnib-composition-showcase

photograph of two women with stringed instruments

Bowing before the King

  • 7 August 2014 6:30-7:30pm

Due Corde
Anne Marie Chrstensen (violin)
Amélie Addison (cello)

Description
Throughout his career in London Handel worked with the most eminent violinists of the time, many of whom had musical and commercial connections with the royal court. The most famous of these is Francesco Geminiani, who, when called to perform for the King in 1715, stated that the only suitable accompanist would be Handel. Less well-known is the violinist with a secondary career as the royal wine merchant...

The concert is built around Geminiani's Opus 1 Sonatas, which the king would have heard performed by these two celebrated musicians. These are complemented by works of other violinists who collaborated with Handel, such as Castrucci, Carbonelli and Festing. This programme of sonatas also allows us to explore the warm sonorities and clear textures made possible by accompanying the violin with cello alone, as an alternative to harpsichord; a practice known to have been adopted by some of the greatest performers in the Corellian tradition, and particularly suited to an intimate Rehearsal and Performance Room.

Programme
Geminiani
Sonata in A major, Op.1 no.1

Castrucci
Sonata in D minor, Op.1 no.7

Carbonelli
Sonata in D minor, Op.1 no.2

Festing
Sonata Op.8 no.1

Geminiani
Sonata in D major, Op.1 no.4

Suitable for

  • Any age

Admission

£9 Adults
£5 Students

Website

http://www.handelhouse.org/whats-on/concerts-and-events/bowing-before-the-king

british harpsichord society logo

BHS Recital: Masterworks of the continental repertoire

  • 12 August 2014 6:30-7:30pm

Musician
Aidan Phillips (harpsichord)

Description
Harpsichordist Aidan Phillips presents remarkable works by masters of the harpsichord, exploring the diversity and virtuosity of their repertoire. Featuring works by JS Bach, Couperin, Duphly, Handel, Rameau and Telemann, he will take you on a musical journey, ascending the heights of compositional technique and expression.

Programme
JS Bach
Prelude and Fughetta in G major

Couperin
Quatrième livre, Ordre

D Scarlatti
Sonata in D minor, K141
Allegro

Duphly:
Pièces de Clavecin, Premier livre, Suitte I
Allemande en ré mineur, Courante en ré mineur, La Vanlo, Rondeau, La Tribolet, Rondeau, La Damanzy, La Cazamajor

Handel
Suite No.3 in D minor, HWV 428
Prelude; Presto-Adagio, Allegro-Adagio, Allemande, Courante, Air; Variation I-V, Presto

Rameau
Pièces de Clavecin, livre II, Suiite I en mi mineur
Allemande, Courante, Le Rappel des Ouiseaux, Rigaudon, Tambourin

Telemann
Suite for harpsichord in C major from Essercizii Musici, no.6, TWV 32:3
Largo, Allemande, Lura, Corrente, Minuet I/II

Suitable for

  • Any age

Admission

£9 Adults
£5 Students

Website

http://www.handelhouse.org/whats-on/concerts-and-events/bhs-masterworks

Arcata Baroque

Dedicated to the King

  • 14 August 2014 6:30-7:30pm

Arcata Baroque
Elin Harries (soprano)
Carina Drury (cello)
Nathaniel Mander (harpsichord)

Description
This programme presents chamber music by a selection of the foremost composers and performers of the London scene in the first quarter of the 18th century.

Ariosti and Bononcini, both rivals for Handel’s Italian Opera success, dedicated books of 6 cantatas to King George I. Geminiani, the foremost violinist of his time, dedicated his book of violin sonatas to the King's Chamberlain as a thank you for introducing him to the Royal circle. He later arranged some of them very successfully for the harpsichord. Geminiani, who arrived in London in 1714, the same year as the Hanoverian succession and performed for the King accompanied by Handel at the keyboard.

Handel, as music teacher to the Royal Princesses, composed various small-scale pieces for his pupils. The cantata Quel fior che all’alba ride, which incorporates the theme later used for and he shall purify, is believed to have been written for Princess Anne around 1739, and shows that the Italian style was still very much in favour with Handel, despite the collapse of the Italian opera scene. The word-book for the first performance of Handel's opera, Radamisto, was uniquely dedicated to the King and the performance marked the public reconciliation of King George I and his son in 1720. Handel maintained a strong personal relationship with soprano Margherita Durastanti who was the primo uomo (first man). The only English composer able to compete with the popularity of Handel was Arne. His masque Alfred, featuring the ever-popular Rule Britannia premiered at the country home of Frederick, Prince of Wales in 1740.

Programme
Ariosti
Cantata L’Amor Onesta

Bononcini
Cantata Da te che pasci ogn’ora

Geminiani
Cello and Keyboard sonata

Handel
Cantata Quel fior che all’alba ride
Cara sposa, amato bene, Radamisto

Arne
Celebrated Ode, in Honour of Great Britain

Suitable for

  • Any age

Admission

Arcata Baroque
Elin Harries (soprano)
Carina Drury (cello)
Nathaniel Mander (harpsichord)

Description
This programme presents chamber music by a selection of the foremost composers and performers of the London scene in the first quarter of the 18th century.

Ariosti and Bononcini, both rivals for Handel’s Italian Opera success, dedicated books of 6 cantatas to King George I. Geminiani, the foremost violinist of his time, dedicated his book of violin sonatas to the King's Chamberlain as a thank you for introducing him to the Royal circle. He later arranged some of them very successfully for the harpsichord. Geminiani, who arrived in London in 1714, the same year as the Hanoverian succession and performed for the King accompanied by Handel at the keyboard.

Handel, as music teacher to the Royal Princesses, composed various small-scale pieces for his pupils. The cantata Quel fior che all’alba ride, which incorporates the theme later used for and he shall purify, is believed to have been written for Princess Anne around 1739, and shows that the Italian style was still very much in favour with Handel, despite the collapse of the Italian opera scene. The word-book for the first performance of Handel's opera, Radamisto, was uniquely dedicated to the King and the performance marked the public reconciliation of King George I and his son in 1720. Handel maintained a strong personal relationship with soprano Margherita Durastanti who was the primo uomo (first man). The only English composer able to compete with the popularity of Handel was Arne. His masque Alfred, featuring the ever-popular Rule Britannia premiered at the country home of Frederick, Prince of Wales in 1740.

Programme
Ariosti
Cantata L’Amor Onesta

Bononcini
Cantata Da te che pasci ogn’ora

Geminiani
Cello and Keyboard sonata

Handel
Cantata Quel fior che all’alba ride
Cara sposa, amato bene, Radamisto

Arne
Celebrated Ode, in Honour of Great Britain

Website

http://www.handelhouse.org/whats-on/concerts-and-events/dedicated-to-the-king

illustration of susannah cibber

Exhibition Walking Tour: Susannah Cibber’s London

  • 17 August 2014 From 11am

Tour leader
Martin Wyatt, Handel House Deputy Director

Description
Join Martin Wyatt on a walk through central London, visiting some of the key sites associated with the great actress and singer Susannah Cibber. The walk will start in Covent Garden and finish at Handel House, where you can visit the exhibition She Was Despiséd: Handel and Susannah Cibber to discover more about the life and times of this fascinating woman.

Suitable for

  • Any age

Admission

£10. Further details will be sent in advance

Website

http://www.handelhouse.org/whats-on/concerts-and-events/exhibition-walking-tour

Salon to Stage: Handel’s chamber music and ‘Royal’ arias

  • 21 August 2014 6:30-7:30pm

Actus Musicus
Rory McCleery (countertenor)
Julia Kuhn (baroque violin)
Isabel Meuser (baroque violin)
Emily Ashton (cello)
John McKean (harpsichord)

Description
Actus Musicus perform a programme of countertenor arias from Handel’s ‘Royal’ operas, with chamber music by Handel and his contemporary Michael Festing. Two of Handel’s well-loved chamber works, the Violin Sonata in D major and F major Trio Sonata from Op.5, are contrasted with a rarely heard trio sonata by Festing. The musical parallels are clear and unsurprising, given that the two worked alongside each other in London. Festing was a violinist (a student of Geminiani) as well as a composer, who helped to set up the Academy of Ancient Music in London and, along with Handel, was a co-founder of the Fund for the Support of Decay'd Musicians and their Families, which became the Royal Society of Musicians.

The ‘Royal’ arias in this programme showcase the range and depth of Handel’s operatic writing, from the gentle V’adoro, o luci belle (Riccardo Primo), to the restless Agitata da fiato incostante, sung by Fernando in Rodrigo. The programme concludes with Thou shalt bring them in from Israel in Egypt, an oratorio in which Handel recycled music from his funeral motet for Queen Caroline.

Programme
Handel
Violin Sonata in D major, Op.1 no.13
Io sperai trovar riposo and Deh! Non dir from Ottone, Re di Germania

Festing
Trio Sonata in D minor, Op.6 no.2

Handel
Agitata da fiato from Rodrigo
V'adoro, o luci belle from Riccardo Primo, Re d'Inghliterra
Trio Sonata in F major, Op.5 no.6
Thou shalt bring them in from Israel in Egypt

Suitable for

  • Any age

Admission

£9 Adults
£5 Students

Website

http://www.handelhouse.org/whats-on/concerts-and-events/salon-to-stage

Musicians

Telemann Romances the French

  • 28 August 2014 6:30-7:30pm

Musicians
Laura Piras (baroque flute)
Julia Kuhn (baroque violin)
Liam Byrne (viola da gamba)
Tom Foster (Harpsichord)

Description
The first set of Quartets, originally published in Hamburg in 1730 were so popular in Paris that it was suggested to Telemann they should be republished there in 1738 under the name ‘Paris Quartets’. Telemann, keen to keep his name on the lips of Parisians, followed the advice and subsequently wrote a second set. He sealed the deal by giving the movements French names.

The measure of Telemann’s success in Paris, partly due to the Paris Quartets, can be seen by the big name performers of his day who he attracted to perform the works - Blavet (flute), Guignon (violin), Forqueray the Younger (gamba) and Edouard (cello).

The concert will feature two Quartets from the second set. Also a quartet for the same instrumentation by Louis Gabriel Guillemain titled Sonates en quatuors ou conversations galantes et amusantes entre une Flute Traversiere, un Violon, une Basse de Viole et la Basse Continue. A native of Paris, Guillemain enjoyed a successful career in Paris at the same time, progressing from musicien ordinaire to the King in 1737 to one of the highest paid musicians in the court by 1740. Guillemain would no doubt have been inspired to write for this wonderful combination of instruments by the success of Telemann’s Quartets.

In contrast, Telemann’s Solo Sonata for Viola da Gamba shows Telemann’s German style of composition.

Programme
Telemann
Paris Quartet in D Major, TWV 43:D3

Guillemain
Sonata in D Minor, Op.12 no.3

Telemann
Solo Sonata for Viola da Gamba, TWV 40:1
Paris Quartet in E Minor, TWV 43:e2

Suitable for

  • Any age

Admission

£9 Adults
£5 Students

Website

http://www.handelhouse.org/whats-on/concerts-and-events/telemann-romances-the-french

Handel and Watteau

  • 4 September 2014 6:30-7:30pm

This programme explores stunning 18th century arias and harpsichord solos from Handel’s London and Watteau’s Paris. Performers are Katherine Manley (soprano) and Bridget Cunningham (harpsichord).

Suitable for

  • Any age

BHS Recital: Two Forgotten Masters

  • 9 September 2014 6:30-7:30pm

Nicolas Siret and Johann Ludwig Krebs were associated with some of the most illustrious composers of their time; Siret was a friend and colleague of François Couperin and Krebs was JS Bach’s star pupil. Performed by harpsichordist Rebecca Pechefsky.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

Flourishes and Dances

  • 11 September 2014 6:30-7:30pm

The Parnassian Ensemble perform a feast of elegant baroque pieces by Handel, Scarlatti, Vivaldi along with the London premiere of Flourishes and Dances by Steve Marshall.

They are Sophie Middleditch, Helen Hooker (recorders), Lynden Cranham (baroque cello), David Pollock (harpsichord).

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

BHS Recital: Rameau

  • 13 September 2014 2-4pm

To commemorate the 250th anniversary of Rameau’s death the British Harpsichord Society survey his complete harpsichord works, briefly explaining their background.

Featuring Jane Clark, Tom Foster, Katarzyna Kovalik and Gilbert Rowland (harpsichord).

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

Admission

Tickets: £12, £6 students

Cembalo Certato è Violino

  • 18 September 2014 6:30-7:30pm

Diane Moore (violin) and Yeo Yat-Soon (harpsichord) explore how JS Bach and his sons developed the genre of sonatas for obbligato harpsichord and violin, or as Bach described them ‘Cembalo certato è Violino’.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

French Connection

  • 21 September 2014 2-3:30pm

Nathaniel Mander (harpsichord) delves into the exquisitely elusive French keyboard style of François Couperin.

A tradition so revered and respected that neither Handel nor JS Bach could resist emulating it in their own works.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

Admission

Tickets: £12, £6 students

La Grotte de Versailles

  • 25 September 2014 6:30-7:30pm

The theorbo, a large lute with a long bass extension, was very popular in France during the second half of the 17th century.

Yair Avidor plays pieces written for this magnificent instrument by Robert de Visée, a lutenist, guitarist and theorbo player at the court of Louis XIV.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

Il Maestro e lo Scolare

  • 2 October 2014 6:30-7:30pm

Duo Jordaan will perform early classical compositions for four-hands played on the harpsichord, including masterworks by Mozart and JC Bach.

These will be interspersed with solo selections from JS Bach’s Well-Tempered Clavier.

They are Adam Jaffe and Anthony Abouhamad (harpsichord).

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

Beethoven and Baroque on Bouzouki

  • 9 October 2014 6:30-7:30pm

The Bouzouki, a musical instrument synonymous with Greece and dating from the Byzantine era, takes centre stage in a performance of transcriptions of baroque and classical music.

Chris Christodoulou (bouzouki) and Anne Marshall (harpsichord) perform.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

Pluckers Re-United!

  • 12 October 2014 2-3pm

Join Amanda Cook (guitar) and Claire Williams (harpsichord) for their return to the Handel House after a sensational sold-out debut in January 2014.

They promise to bring another exciting programme, featuring an eclectic mix of music for both instruments.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

BHS Recital: Vo’ far Guerra

  • 14 October 2014 6:30-7:30pm

Harpsichordist Kenneth Weiss comes to the Handel House for the first time with a programme including William Babell’s colourful transcription of ‘Vo far guerra’ from Handel’s Rinaldo, and extracts from some of his recent recordings.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

Dances, Drums and Whistles!

  • 16 October 2014 6:30-7:30pm

Flautotonic collaborate with percussive forces for an entertaining exploration of dance music.

This is music to tap your toes to from Medieval rottas to Irish jigs and Restoration dances to French minuets. They are Lauren Brant, David Beaney (recorders), Rebecca McChrystal (percussion) and Claire Williams (harpsichord).

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

France Meets Italy

  • 23 October 2014 6:30-7:30pm

German harpsichordist Medea Bindewald explores the interplay between the refined French and the more emotional Italian style, which became increasingly fashionable in France in the mid-18th century.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

Hardly Handel: Bach’s French Suites

  • 30 October 2014 6:30-7:30pm

JS Bach’s so-called French Suites epitomize domestic music-making. Penned possibly as a wedding present for his second wife, Anna Magdalena, these delightful suites exude an intimacy that is ideally suited to Handel’s own music room.

Performed by Julian Perkins (harpsichord).

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

EYEMUSIC Concert 1: Sound Structures with Sarah Angliss

  • 13 November 2014 6:30-7:30pm

Composer, performer, roboticist and historian Sarah Angliss brings her electroacoustic inventions to respond to the history of Handel House. The domestic setting of Handel’s music room will provide the setting for her ‘homely’ objects. Crewdson and Cevanne will also demonstrate, with costumier Jodie Cartman, a new piece of ‘wearable music technology’.

Part of the EYEMUSIC series. Inspired by Renaissance ‘Augenmusik’ (where music notation mixed with art) Composer-in-Residence Cevanne Horrocks-Hopayian has opened her music programme to visual perspectives. From synesthesia to theatre; costume to construction; Cevanne builds on her last sell-out series with new themes, featuring actor-writer Jessica Hynes, works by Roxanna Panufnik and James Macmillan, as well as the première of her final Handel House commission.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

Admission

Tickets: £9, £5 students

EYEMUSIC Concert 2: Haze Indigo with Jessica Hynes

  • 16 November 2014 2-4pm

Synesthesia – the ability to see sound – drives the programme with psychedelic works and music by Duke Ellington. Bassist Calum Gourlay and Cevanne will perform and special guest actress and writer Jessica Hynes will sing celebrating the restoration of Jimi Hendrix’s flat in Handel House.

Part of the EYEMUSIC series. Inspired by Renaissance ‘Augenmusik’ (where music notation mixed with art) Composer-in-Residence Cevanne Horrocks-Hopayian has opened her music programme to visual perspectives. From synesthesia to theatre; costume to construction; Cevanne builds on her last sell-out series with new themes, featuring actor-writer Jessica Hynes, works by Roxanna Panufnik and James Macmillan, as well as the première of her final Handel House commission.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

Admission

Tickets: £12, £6 students

EYEMUSIC Concert 3: Seeing Sound with Oren Marshall

  • 20 November 2014 6:30-7:30pm

Oren Marshall ‘the Jimi Hendrix of the Tuba’ joins Cevanne on an exploration of notation from visual perspectives, old and new: Ancient Egyptian colour charts, Renaissance Augenmusik, 20th century graphic scores and beyond.

Part of the EYEMUSIC series. Inspired by Renaissance ‘Augenmusik’ (where music notation mixed with art) Composer-in-Residence Cevanne Horrocks-Hopayian has opened her music programme to visual perspectives. From synesthesia to theatre; costume to construction; Cevanne builds on her last sell-out series with new themes, featuring actor-writer Jessica Hynes, works by Roxanna Panufnik and James Macmillan, as well as the première of her final Handel House commission.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

Admission

Tickets: £9, £5 students

EYEMUSIC Concert 4: The Fat Lady has Sung

  • 23 November 2014 2-4pm

Ziazan Horrocks-Hopayian (voice, harp) has reconstructed the lost bel canto singing method, and with harpsichordist Tessa Marchington, will take you on a journey through opera’s birth, its demise and end with its future in the form of Cevanne’s commission for Handel House. Expect to see demonstrations of costumes inspired by Handel’s London by Lindsey Holmes of Costumiersaurus and the audience is encouraged to dress in their interpretation of ‘retro-futurism’.

Part of the EYEMUSIC series. Inspired by Renaissance ‘Augenmusik’ (where music notation mixed with art) Composer-in-Residence Cevanne Horrocks-Hopayian has opened her music programme to visual perspectives. From synesthesia to theatre; costume to construction; Cevanne builds on her last sell-out series with new themes, featuring actor-writer Jessica Hynes, works by Roxanna Panufnik and James Macmillan, as well as the première of her final Handel House commission.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

Admission

Tickets: £12, £6 students

Getting there

Entrance to the museum is round the back of 25 Brook Street in Lancashire Court.
Nearest tube stations are Bond Street and Oxford Circus and there are numerous buses to Oxford Street, Bond Street and Regent Street.

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