Science Museum

photogrpah of Making the Modern World Gallery at the Science Museum
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Where else can you find life-changing objects from Stephenson’s Rocket to the Apollo 10 command module, take in a science show, catch an immersive 3D movie, enjoy the thrills of a special effects simulator, introduce children to science with fun, hands-on interactives and encounter the past, present and future of technology in seven floors of galleries? At the Science Museum you can find all this and more!

Venue Type:

Museum, Science centre

Opening hours

Daily 10.00-18.00

Closed 24-26 December

Admission charges

Admission to the Museum is free but charges apply to the IMAX 3D Cinema, simulators and some special exhibitions and events.

The Science Museum has over 300,000 objects in its care, with particular strengths in the history of western science, technology and medicine since 1700.

It has been uniquely placed to acquire objects recording the Industrial Revolution, and now holds unrivalled collections in this area. Medical artifacts from all periods and cultures also form an important part of its holdings.

Items from this collection

Collection details

World Cultures, Toys and Hobbies, Social History, Science and Technology, Natural Sciences, Medicine, Maritime, Land Transport, Inland Waterways, Industry, Fine Art, Film and Media, Design, Costume and Textiles, Coins and Medals, Aviation, Archives, Agriculture, Weapons and War

Key artists and exhibits

  • Launchpad
  • atmosphere
  • Who Am I
  • Apollo 10
  • Babbage
  • Difference engine
  • Fly Zone
  • IMAX
  • Lates
Exhibition details are listed below, you may need to scroll down to see them all.
photograph of telescope

Cosmos & Culture

  • 23 July 2009 — 31 December 2015 *on now

Explore how astronomy has changed the way we see our universe - and ourselves - through this object-rich exhibition. From ancient heritage to cutting edge technology, trace the history of people and the stars through different stories drawn from around the world.

Cosmos & Culture uses a new multimedia display environment that allows you to explore objects in depth and find out about key scientific concepts. See how different instruments work, discover the stories of the people who made and used them, and enjoy beautiful models, illustrations and photographs.

Exhibition supported by the Patrons of the Science Museum with additional support from the Science and Technology Facilities Council, STFC.

Suitable for



mock-up image of information age gallery at science museum

Information age

  • 1 October 2014 — 31 December 2016 *on now

Information Age is be the first museum gallery in the UK dedicated to the history of communication and information technology, celebrating over 200 years of inventions and innovations that have transformed how we communicate. The gallery takes over the largest single space in the Science Museum and features over 800 unique objects from our world class collections.

From the laying of the first transatlantic telegraph cable between the UK and North America, to the birth of satellite communications and the smart phone, Information Age explores the major technological advances that have helped shape the connected world we live in today. Remarkable personal stories about how these developments have transformed peoples’ lives are brought to life through sophisticated interactive displays, film and audio.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly


photograph of entrance to Churchill's Scientists exhibition

Churchill's Scientists

  • 1 November 2014 — 1 March 2016 *on now

Marking the 50th anniversary of his death, Churchill’s Scientists tells the little-known story of how Churchill’s fascination with science led to the scientific achievements that helped Britain win the Second World War.

Discover how the power of science was harnessed during the war, from the recent invention of radar and the production of penicillin and antibiotics, to Britain’s top secret research behind the first atomic bomb. See these incredible events brought to life through a rich array of significant historical objects, original film footage, letters and archive images.

Explore how the culture of scientific achievement fostered by Churchill flourished after the war, invigorating scientific research across a wide range of fields, including molecular genetics, radio astronomy, nuclear power, nerve and brain function and robotics.

The exhibition features a number of personal objects belonging to Churchill, such as the cigar he was smoking in 1951 on the day he learned he'd been re-elected as Prime Minister, and his green velvet ‘siren suit’ – a one-piece outfit devised by him and designed to be put on in a hurry during air raids.

Suitable for


Challenge of Materials

  • 1 November 2014 — 1 November 2018 *on now

Explore and experience the properties of materials in our eye-opening Challenge of Materials gallery.

Walk across a magnificent glass bridge suspended by steel wires spanning the main hall. Discover historic gems, state-of-the-art materials and bizarre items, such as a cardboard chair and a steel wedding dress. You'll also see art installations from around the world.

From superconductors to spider silk, visit this gallery to discover a wide variety of materials.

Suitable for


The Secret Life of the Home

  • 1 November 2014 — 1 November 2018 *on now

From pop-up toasters to horse-drawn vacuum cleaners, take a closer look at the development of household appliances.

Most of the objects on show date from the late 19th and the 20th century. But you’ll also find ancient Roman keys, 18th century cooking utensils and a 21st century robotic vacuum cleaner. In fact, you’ll be able to discover how applied robotics is one of the key ways in which the appliances in your home will develop in the future.

How does a CD player, washing machine and toilet work? Interactive exhibits in the gallery will help you find out.

You can also examine locks, try to outwit a burglar alarm and play ‘Pong’, the world’s first home video game.

Visit Secrets of the Home to see how the design of household gadgets and gizmos has changed over time.

Suitable for



  • 1 November 2014 — 1 November 2018 *on now

The Agriculture gallery traces the history of arable farming and considers a future of genetically modified food. From the ploughs and hoes of the Middle Ages to the combine harvesters and balers of the 20th century, this gallery presents a fascinating collection of original machinery and superb scale models.

Find out about dibblers, seed drills, clod-crushers and junglebusters, and see how the working life of an arable farm changes as the seasons unfold. Examine an original Ferguson tractor and operate a cut-away combine harvester yourself.

Visit the Agriculture gallery for a fascinating insight into the history and future of farming.

Suitable for



  • 1 November 2014 — 1 November 2018 *on now

Learn about the most surprising science stories and the biggest breakthroughs in our multimedia science news gallery, Antenna.

Antenna brings you science news from every angle – from headline-grabbing gadgets to hot topics and full-on feature stories. And we'll be asking you to review and rate the latest ideas along with leading scientists, engineers, designers and thinkers.

Suitable for


Energy Hall

  • 1 November 2014 — 1 November 2018 *on now

The Energy Hall traces the remarkable story of steam and how it shaped the world we live in today.

Steam has been the driving force behind British industry for 300 years. Without it, the Industrial Revolution could never have happened. Even now, steam provides 75% of the electricity we use every day.

Discover an unparalleled collection of historic full-size engines and models. Displays include:

The oldest surviving and unaltered atmospheric engine
Rotative engines built by James Watt
High-pressure engines of the type pioneered by Richard Trevithick
A steam turbine designed and built by Charles Parsons

Visit the Energy Hall to gain a unique insight into how steam engines developed over time.

Suitable for


James Watt and our World

  • 1 November 2014 — 1 November 2018 *on now

Explore the legendary attic workshop of engineer James Watt, preserved as it was when he died in 1819. The workshop is an astonishing time-capsule containing its original furniture, windows, doors and fireplace, and 8,430 fascinating objects left as they were in Watt’s lifetime.

See some of Watt’s remarkable inventions that have shaped the way we live today and learn why he was heralded the ‘greatest benefactor of the human race’. From steam power to tea services, explore the relationship between Watt’s steam engine and a new age of consumption.

Watt's improved engines meant steam could be used everywhere, from pumping coal mines to powering textile mills and breweries. Find out more about the renowned engineer and his incredible legacy.

Visit this gallery to discover remarkable objects that helped shape Britain’s industrial past and future.

Suitable for


Measuring Time

  • 1 November 2014 — 1 November 2018 *on now

In Measuring Time you’ll discover a rich collection of more than 500 timepieces. From sand-glasses to sundials, water clocks to wristwatches, trace the remarkable history of timekeeping.

Clockmakers and watchmakers pioneered precision in manufacturing. Early craftsmen, labouring in small domestic workshops, learned to subdivide production into separate specialised tasks – inventing mass production before the factory system. In this gallery, you’ll find out how accurate timekeeping was highly prized and attracted the finest craftsmen.

Among the timepieces on display is the Wells Cathedral clock, built around 1392. It’s the second oldest surviving clock in England and the third oldest clock in the world.

Visit Measuring Time for a fascinating insight into the history of timekeeping.

Suitable for



  • 1 November 2014 — 1 November 2018 *on now

The Atmosphere gallery is an exciting place to make sense of the climate – the science of how it works, what it’s doing now and what it might do next.

Step into a virtual world, with its own oceans, land and atmosphere, and go back in time to discover key moments in the Earth’s multibillion-year climate history. Uncover the secrets of ice cores and stalagmites, then head for the future to wonder at the latest ideas for a low-carbon life.

Fascinating objects include a real Antartic ice core, tree rings and scientists' instruments. Come to this gallery to get to grips with the latest climate news and investigate the important issue of climate change.

Suitable for


Who Am I?

  • 1 November 2014 — 1 November 2018 *on now

What makes you smarter than a chimp? What makes you smile? What makes you, you?

Who am I? invites you to explore the science of who you are through intriguing objects, provocative artworks and hands-on exhibits.

Discover what your voice sounds like as a member of the opposite sex, morph your face to see what you’ll look like as you age, or collect DNA to catch a criminal in our brand-new interactive exhibits.

Investigate some of the characteristics that make humans such a successful species, such as personality, intelligence and language.

Reflect on the big questions that new techniques in science are raising, and explore how your genetics and brain combine to create your unique identity.

Visit the Who am I? gallery now and discover yourself.

Suitable for


Exploring Space

  • 1 November 2014 — 1 November 2018 *on now

From rockets to satellites, probes to landers, this gallery showcases some out-of-this world objects. Explore how we’ve sent spacecraft to other planets, walked on the Moon and peered into the heart of our galaxy and beyond.

You’ll be able to see a full-sized replica of ‘Eagle’ – the lander that took astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin to the Moon in 1969. Then discover how we are able to live in space – to breathe, eat, drink and go to the toilet.

Get a unique insight into the history of rockets. Suspended from the ceiling are two real space rockets – a British Black Arrow and a United States Scout.

You can also find out how the space age started in 1957 with the launch of Sputnik 1. See a full-size replica of the Huygens module that landed on Titan in 2005 and a model of the Beagle 2 Mars lander.

Visit this gallery to learn the astonishing story of space exploration.

Suitable for



  • 1 November 2014 — 1 November 2018 *on now

From mankind’s earliest dreams of flight to the wide-body aeroplanes of today, discover the absorbing story of flight.

Overhead walkways allow you to get up close to aeroplanes suspended in the air. Examine exhibits from the pioneer days of aviation, including the world’s most authentic Antoinette monoplane (1909), Amy Johnson’s Gipsy Moth and the Vickers Vimy, which first crossed the Atlantic in 1919.

Suitable for


Making the Modern World

  • 1 November 2014 — 1 November 2018 *on now

The Making the Modern World gallery presents some of the Museum’s most remarkable objects. Chart 250 years of science and technology and discover some iconic items that have shaped our society.

Come face-to-face with the Apollo 10 command module, Stephenson’s Rocket, Babbage’s Difference Engine No. 1, Crick and Watson’s DNA model and the first Apple computer.

You’ll also find thought-provoking objects such as penicillin from Fleming’s laboratory, a porcelain bowl salvaged from Hiroshima and a clock that will tell the time for the next 10,000 years.

Visit this exceptional collection to follow the cultural history of industrialisation from 1750 to the present day.

Suitable for


Concept visualisation of the Engineer Your Future exhibitio

Engineer Your Future

  • 17 December 2014 — 1 December 2017 *on now

Could you shape the world we live in? Find out if you’ve got the problem-solving, big-thinking, team-working skills to be a globe-trotting engineer of tomorrow.

Visit our interactive exhibition for teens thinking about their futures, Engineer Your Future, where you can:

Play Rugged Rovers: Design a space rover that will travel the furthest across a challenging alien landscape full of jumps, boulders and slopes. Can you problem-solve and beat your friends’ creations?

Test your brain’s ability to think about the big picture: Play our game to build and test systems inspired by some seriously complex engineering, from electrical grids to rail networks and baggage handling systems.

Watch our beautiful short film We Engineer: Find out how engineers make the best better at some of the country’s most hi-tech test labs and see their cutting-edge test models on display.

Surprise yourself: Play FutureVille to explore a city of the not-too-distant future and meet the women and men who engineer in places you didn’t expect, from hospitals to Hollywood.

Recommended for 11-to 15-year-olds.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly


photograph of food arranged artistically on a plate

Cravings: Can your food control you?

  • 12 February 2015 — 6 March 2016 *on now

From the flavours you learned to love in the womb to the very next bite you take, your appetite has been shaped by food. Through personal stories, fascinating objects and cutting-edge science and technology, Cravings explores how food affects your body, brain and eating habits.

This new exhibition reveals how not one but two brains work together alongside the hidden world of gut bacteria to affect your cravings.

Take part in real neurogastronomy experiments and help researchers uncover how what we see, hear, smell, touch and taste can change our desire for food. Explore the potential of technology to internally control appetite through your nerves, compare how baby animals react to sweet foods, and find out about the world’s first poo bank.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly


photograph of Yuri Gagarin before the first space flight, April 12 1961

Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age

  • 18 September 2015 — 7 March 2016 *on now

Discover dramatic stories of Russian space exploration this new temporary exhibition.

For the first time in the UK, the remarkable story of Russian scientific and technological ingenuity that kick-started the space age is explored in a landmark exhibition at the Science Museum.

Cosmonauts brings to life the stories of Russian space endeavour to dramatic life through a unique collection of space artefacts, many of which have never before been seen either outside Russia.

In 1957 Soviet Russia launched Sputnik, the world's first artificial satellite, and four years later it sent the first human into space - Yuri Gagarin. However, the story of Russian space exploration is much older. Cosmonauts explores the science and technology of Russian space travel in its cultural and spiritual context, revealing a deep rooted national yearning for space that was shaped by the turbulent early decades of the twentieth century.

Amongst the star objects on display are real, cosmonaut-flown spacecraft, pioneering rocket engines, space suits and other life support systems. There are also examples of the personal and poignant - memorabilia belonging to some of the biggest names in spaceflight.

Cosmonauts represents a major collaboration between the Moscow State Memorial Museum of Cosmonautics and the Federal Space Agency, Roscosmos, and draws on the support of many institutions and individuals in the UK and Russia to bring together the most significant collection of space artefacts ever to leave Russia.

Suitable for

  • Any age


Resources listed here may include websites, bookable tours and workshops, books, loan boxes and more. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all.

Building Bonanza Low Energy House Game

Try to build a "house of the future" by selecting the most environmentally friendly, low-energy materials and features in this online interactive game.

Challenge of Materials

An online exhibition about materials, with interactive elements exploring types of materials, selecting materials, making materials, and 'world-changing' materials.


  • Science Museum


  • Science Museum

Energy - fuelling the future

A website designed to help KS2 and KS3 children find out about how we use energy, and make the most of a visit to the Energy Fuelling the Future gallery at the Science Museum. Here you will find fascinating facts, quizzes, and a wealth of practical activities developed with teachers who have tested them with their own children in schools. Many of the activities can be adapted for different audiences.


  • Science Museum

Kids' Science Book Club

The Kids Science Book Club is a fun and interactive book club to encourage children to read and learn whilst enjoying a literary extravaganza. It’s a great way to learn more about science in a fun way. On Saturdays, monthly at 11.00.

How to obtain

Booking is essential - email or call 020 7942 4333.

Making the Modern World: Bridges

This mathematics study module, available online, looks at how differently shaped bridges, built at different periods of time, handle loads and stress.

Making the Modern World: Urban Sustainability - Cities and the Role of Technology

This geography study module, available online, looks at urban development. Case studies are taken from cities around the world, and demonstrate cities as different kinds of systems, sustainability, and how technological developments affect urban life.

Science Museum
Exhibition Road
Greater London



General enquiries

General enquiries and feedback


Information and bookings

0870 870 4868

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.