Ashmolean Museum

A white stone building with Grecian style portico and columns
baby changing facilities icon Food icon Guided tours icon Shop icon Library icon Study area icon Hearing disability facilities icon Visual disability facilities icon Wheelchair access icon

Oxford’s Ashmolean Museum is the country’s oldest public museum and home to one of the most important collections of art and archaeology to be found anywhere.

The collections span the civilisations of east and west, charting the aspirations of humankind from the Neolithic era to the present day. Among its treasures are the world's largest collection of Raphael drawings, the most important collection of pre-Dynastic Egyptian material in Europe, the only great Minoan collection in Britain, the finest Anglo-Saxon collections outside the British Museum and the foremost collection of modern Chinese art in the Western world.

Venue Type:

Museum, Gallery, Archive

Opening hours

Tues - Sun & Bank Holiday Mondays: 10.00-17.00
Closed: Every Mon & 24,25,26 Dec

Admission charges


Additional info

Parking is available next to the Museum on St. Giles

The entire collection of the Ashmolean Museum is a Designated Collection of national importance.

The Ashmolean Museum was founded in 1683, the first institutional museum in Britain, and arguably in Europe. Notable among antiquities are the Egyptian collections, the Classical Greek collections including the ‘Arundel Marbles’ and the Felix Gem, and the Alfred Jewel. Paintings date from early Italian to Pre-Raphaelite and there are outstanding drawings by Raphael and Michelangelo. The arts of China, Japan, South East Asia and Islam are well represented, as are Maiolica, Renaissance bronzes and numismatics.

Collection details

World Cultures, Fine Art, Decorative and Applied Art, Coins and Medals, Archaeology

Key artists and exhibits

  • Designated Collection
Exhibition details are listed below, you may need to scroll down to see them all.

Apes and Monkeys in Asian Art

  • 14 June — 30 October 2016 *on now

To celebrate the Year of the Monkey in 2016 this special display showcases images of adventurous and mischievous monkeys in works on paper from Iran to Japan.

The display features papercuts, woodblock prints and lithographs of monkeys in the wild, monkeys as gods, and scenes from the famous 16th-century Chinese novel Journey to the West.


Liu Dan

  • 18 October 2016 — 26 February 2017 *on now

Liu Dan (b. 1953) is one of China’s leading artists, at the forefront of the generation of painters who have been working in radically new ways in the traditional medium of ink.

He is exceptional in combining themes current since the Song dynasty using his own techniques derived from 14th-century artists. His paintings are meticulous, and very often huge in scale. He is equally interested in Italian drawing of the 14th to 16th centuries as much as their Yuan and Ming dynasty contemporaries, and aspects of their work are subsumed in his.

The exhibition will include a landscape presented by Liu Dan to the Ashmolean in memory of the great historian of Chinese art, Professor Michael Sullivan (1916–2013).


Power and Protection: Islamic Art and the Supernatural

  • 20 October 2016 — 15 January 2017 *on now

Showcasing over a hundred spectacular objects from Morocco to China, Power and Protection is the first major exhibition to explore the supernatural in the art of the Islamic world.

Within Islamic societies, people of all backgrounds have engaged in fascinating yet controversial practices such as the casting of horoscopes and interpretation of omens. The exhibition includes objects and works of art from the 12th to the 20th century which have been used as sources of guidance and protection in the dramatic events of human history. These include dream-books, talismanic charts and amulets.

This is an unmissable chance to see objects of breathtaking quality and astonishing scale, many of which have never been seen in public.


Ashmolean Museum
Beaumont Street



Education Service

Museum shop


01865 278000

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.