Freud Museum London

Freud's couch
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Listed house in Hampstead where Sigmund Freud and his family lived after fleeing the Nazis in 1938. The Museum was founded in 1986. It has featured in numerous films and TV broadcasts and hosts regular exhibitions and events. It is available for hire for filming and evening functions.

Venue Type:

Museum

Opening hours

Wed 12.00-20.30
Thurs-Sun 12.00-17.00

Admission charges

Adults: £8.00
Senior Citizens: £6
Concs: £4.00 (with valid student ID card, children aged 12-16, unemployed persons, disabled persons)
Under 12s: Free

Discounts

  • Museums Association

Additional info

Our library, study and research facilities are open by appointment only.

Sigmund Freud's large collection of Egyptian, Greek, Roman and Oriental antiquities and his library. His study with the psychoanalytic couch preserve his working environment. A reference library, archive and picture library document the history of psychoanalysis.

Collection details

Archaeology, Archives, Costume and Textiles, Decorative and Applied Art, Fine Art, Personalities, Social History

Key artists and exhibits

  • Freud's couch; Dali portrait of Freud; Brouillet print of Charcot; Abu Simbel print; photographs of Yvette Guilbert, Princess Marie Bonaparte, Lou Andreas-Salome, Charcot, Freud family.
Events details are listed below. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all. For events that don't have a specific date see the 'Resources' tab above.
Image of artist's sculpture - Orgone Accumulator, wood, wool, iron wool and metallic plates.

Wilhem Reich and The Orgone Energy

  • 8 October 2017 2-4pm

Artist Annie Ratti will present her latest research on Wilhelm Reich’s investigations into orgone energy and his influence in psychoanalytic treatments of mental illness; developing one aspect of scientific inquiry that might be termed ‘deviant’ or marginal to mainstream science.

Her artistic research into Reich’s theories proceeds from the presumption that a fresh and critical understanding of scientific methods and scientific truth might be achieved by investigating what the scientific community has defined as its other, the unscientific.

Focusing on the processes of knowledge production at the margins of science, her investigation of Reich aims to show the brilliance and strangeness of his work, which while failing to meet the true conditions of the scientific and psychoanalytic communities nonetheless inspired savagely negative reactions from both. She will develop this irony, what it tells about both Reich and his scientific and psychoanalytic criticism; and that in the understanding and insight that were lost in the process of defining his work as non-scientific. The intention is to recover Reich’s insights through the artistic practice, which entails a sympathetic while at the same time critical engagement with his own discoveries.

The artist's 'Orgone Accumulator' pictured will be on display at the Museum on Saturday 7th and Sunday 8th October.

Suitable for

  • Any age

Admission

Free with admission
(admission costs on website)

Website

https://freud.org.uk/events/76989/wilhem-reich-and-the-orgone-energy/

Black background with model, featureless figure in the foreground in a shocking red garment.

Fashion and Psychoanalysis

  • 14 October 2017 9:30am-5pm
  • 15 October 2017 10am-1:30pm

Speakers will address a wide range of themes connecting fashion, clothing, style and the body to psychoanalysis, creativity and unconscious emotional life. The conference will also explore the largely neglected role of fashion in clinical and mental health settings – aiming to address the many idiosyncrasies, taboos and paradoxes involved.

The second day will be dedicated to wellbeing and mental health in the context of fashion. Through research and clinical perspectives, it will invite you to unravel two rather paradoxical phenomena: the relative absence of psychology in the fashion world and the apparent absence of fashion in the clinical encounter. The conference will end with a panel discussion on ‘Enclothed cognition’.

Speakers

SATURDAY 9.30 - 5.00
Fashion Thinking and Psychoanalysis

Zowie Broach (biog)
Introductory Thoughts

Valerie Steele (biog)
Freud and Fashion

Claire Pajaczkowska (biog)
In Fashion : Sexual Selection and the Fetish

Anouchka Grose (biog)
Ugliness+Time: Fashion and the Prisoners’ Dilemma

Shaun Cole (biog)
The ‘Great Masculine Renunciation’ Re-assessed

Philip Mann (biog)
The Dandy : Pathological Hero of Modernism

Caroline Evans (biog)
Denise Poiret and the Material Mnemonics of Fashion

Bella Freud (biog)
in conversation with Amanda Harlech (biog)

SUNDAY 10am - 1.30pm
Fashion, Psychology and the Clinical Encounter

Claire Pajaczkowska
Understanding 'Empathy by Design'

Katerina Fotopoulou (biog)
Body Imaging: Mentalising and Modifying our Bodily Appearance

Emilia Raczkowska (biog)
'There Remains the Area of Clothes' – Enclothed Cognition from the Lab to the Couch

PANEL DISCUSSION
Enclothed Cognition
Carolyn Mair, Anouchka Grose, Katerina Fotopoulou, Claire Pajaczkowska and others

Carolyn Mair (biog)
Closing Thoughts

Day tickets available
Tickets from £25 - £105

Admission

Day tickets available
Tickets from £25 - £105

Website

https://freud.org.uk/events/76977/fashion-and-psychoanalysis/?utm_source=Culture%2024

Image of the book cover. The book title surrounded by cartoon-like figures of various people holding traditional occupational roles in society.

Says Who? The Struggle for Authority in a Market-based Society

  • 20 October 2017 8-9:30pm

‘We live in an extremely controlling society in which authority has disappeared … traditional authority is lapsing into brute force … and we ourselves must take the first steps towards creating a new social order.’

This was the trenchant diagnosis by Paul Verhaeghe at the end of his acclaimed book about identity, What About Me? Now he returns to investigate another aspect of our lives under threat: authority.

In Says Who? Verhaeghe examines how authority functions and why we need it in order to develop healthy psyches and strong societies. Going against the laissez-faire ethics of a free-market age, he argues that rather than seeing authority as a source of oppression we should invest in developing it in the places that matter. Only by strengthening the power of horizontal groups within existing social structures, such as in education, the economy, and the political system, can we restore authority to its rightful place. Whether you are a parent or child, teacher or student, employer or employee, Says Who? provides the answers you need.

Paul Verhaeghe will give a short lecture, followed by a discussion with Dany Nobus and a Q&A.

Suitable for

  • Any age

Admission

£12 Adult

£8 Concessions

Website

https://freud.org.uk/events/76979/says-who-the-struggle-for-authority-in-a-market-based-society/

Still from horror film ; Carrie (1976). Girl in red dress covered in blood

PROJECTIONS: Psychoanalytic investigation of women in horror films

  • 23 October — 27 November 2017

Following the literary tradition established by Edgar Allan Poe, Bram Stoker and Mary Shelley, the horror genre in film seeks to elicit physiological and psychological reactions through visual and narrative techniques involving suspense, gore, the macabre and the supernatural. Horror films transfix and terrify audiences in equal measure, unfailingly achieving suspension of disbelief because fear is a universal and powerful emotion.

The role of women in horror movies is especially intriguing because of the ambivalent position occupied by female characters, ranging from victims of violence to perpetrators of dread. In The Question of Lay Analysis (1926), Sigmund Freud wrote, “The sexual life of adult women is a dark continent for psychology.” Even at the end of his life, Freud was preoccupied by a question that never left him: “What do women want?” – the mystery of female subjectivity persisted with the advancement of psychoanalytic thought. It is precisely this perception of ‘the unknown’ that drives much of the unsettling storylines concerning women in horror films.

Relying predominantly on Julia Kristeva’s theory of abjection, we will investigate cinematic representations of female bodies that appear paradoxically fragmented, decayed and impure, as well as wholesome, nurturing and attractive. Kristeva defines horror as a breakdown in meaning caused by the loss of boundaries between self and other. The abject disturbs identity, borders and rules – horror films portraying unclean and taboo elements of the feminine experience reveal the entwined dual system of Eros (beauty, sexual awakening, love, pregnancy) and Thanatos (possession, disease, destruction, death).

Other theoretical constructs in this series will include Freud’s hysteria, Jacques Lacan’s jouissance, and R.D. Laing’s ontological insecurity. Advance viewing is optional, select scenes and montages will be shown during weekly sessions (see filmography below). Content warning: graphic imagery will be presented – viewer discretion is advised.

Week 1 – ADOLESCENCE: Teeth (2007), Carrie (1976), The Exorcist (1973)

Week 2 – IDENTITY: The Ring (2002), Single White Female (1992), The Brøken (2008)

Week 3 – PSYCHOSIS: Black Swan (2010), Whatever Happened to Baby Jane (1962), Rosemary’s Baby (1968)

Week 4 – ECONOMICS: Starry Eyes (2014), The Hunger (1983), American Psycho (2000)

Week 5 – DEMONS: The Entity (1982), Possession (1981), Paranormal Activity (2007)

Week 6 – DEVOURING: Neon Demon (2016), Dans Ma Peau (2002), Eat (2014)

PROJECTIONS is psychoanalysis for film interpretation. PROJECTIONS empowers film spectators to express subjective associations they consider to be meaningful. Expertise in psychoanalytic theory is not necessary - the only prerequisite is the desire to enter and inhabit the imaginary world of film, which is itself a psychoanalytic act. MARY WILD, a Freudian cinephile from Montreal, is the creator of PROJECTIONS.

Suitable for

  • 18+

Admission

Full price: £100

Freinds of the Museum £75

Students and Concessions: £75

Website

https://freud.org.uk/events/76988/projections-psychoanalytic-investigation-of-women-in-horror-films/

Book cover, Red book, black text with title

Class and Psychoanalysis

  • 22 November 2017 7-8:30pm

What does psychoanalysis have to say about the emotional landscapes of class, the hidden injuries and disavowed privileges? How does class figure in clinical work and what part does it play in psychotherapeutic trainings? In these times of increasing inequality, Joanna Ryan will discuss aspects of her timely new book Class and Psychoanalysis: Landscapes of Inequality, exploring what can be learned about the psychic formations of class, and the class formations of psychoanalysis. Addressing some of the many challenges facing a psychoanalysis that aims to include class in its remit, she holds the tension between the radical and progressive potential of psychoanalysis, in its unique understandings of the unconscious, with its status as a mainly expensive and exclusive practice.

The aim of this evening’s discussion, part of the 20th anniversary celebrations of the Site for Contemporary Psychoanalysis, is to open up debate about this important but neglected subject.

“Class and Psychoanalysis is a text of great importance. Joanna Ryan writes in a clear and objective way about the neglect of social class in psychoanalysis, yet behind this objectivity is a passionate involvement that will strike a chord with all concerned psychoanalysts and psychotherapists. The book presents the best available overview of the history, theory and practice of psychoanalysis in relation to social class, combining this with interview material from the author’s own studies of psychotherapists to give a detailed and compelling picture of how class enters the consulting room. Engaging with this profound yet accessible book is essential for all who care about class injuries and how we might find ways to respond to them.” Stephen Frosh, Professor of Psychosocial Studies, Birkbeck, University of London

Suitable for

  • Any age

Admission

Full price: £10

Friends of the Museum/student/concession: £8

Website

https://freud.org.uk/events/76995/class-and-psychoanalysis/

Freud Museum London
20 Maresfield Gardens
London
Greater London
NW3 5SX
England

Website

www.freud.org.uk/

E-mail

info@freud.org.uk

Telephone

020 7435 2002

Fax

020 7431 5452

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
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