Freud Museum London

Freud's couch
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Listed house in Hampstead where Sigmund Freud and his family lived after fleeing the Nazis in 1938. The Museum was founded in 1986. It has featured in numerous films and TV broadcasts and hosts regular exhibitions and events. It is available for hire for filming and evening functions.

Venue Type:

Museum

Opening hours

Wed 12.00-20.30
Thurs-Sun 12.00-17.00

Admission charges

Adults: £8.00
Senior Citizens: £6
Concs: £4.00 (with valid student ID card, children aged 12-16, unemployed persons, disabled persons)
Under 12s: Free

Discounts

  • Museums Association

Additional info

Our library, study and research facilities are open by appointment only.

Sigmund Freud's large collection of Egyptian, Greek, Roman and Oriental antiquities and his library. His study with the psychoanalytic couch preserve his working environment. A reference library, archive and picture library document the history of psychoanalysis.

Collection details

Archaeology, Archives, Costume and Textiles, Decorative and Applied Art, Fine Art, Personalities, Social History

Key artists and exhibits

  • Freud's couch; Dali portrait of Freud; Brouillet print of Charcot; Abu Simbel print; photographs of Yvette Guilbert, Princess Marie Bonaparte, Lou Andreas-Salome, Charcot, Freud family.
Events details are listed below. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all. For events that don't have a specific date see the 'Resources' tab above.
Original ergonomic chair from Freud's study

Psychoanalysis After Freud

  • 11 January — 29 March 2018 *on now

Psychoanalysis was initiated by Freud, then transformed by a series of powerful creative figures who both extended and deepened its range, opening new intellectual horizons as they applied its methods to new problems and new fields. We will focus on four leading innovators, carefully examining their criticisms of Freud and the manner in which they modified his theories and therapeutic practice. In this way, the course will give an overview of the development of psychoanalysis across its first century and into the beginning of its second. While intended to be accessible to beginners, it will also stimulate those who already have some knowledge of the field.

(The course is self-contained – as is ‘Introducing Freud at the Freud Museum’ which precedes it in the autumn term. The two courses can be taken in either order, or as ‘stand alone’ modules, but complete beginners wanting a thorough introduction to psychoanalysis should take ‘Introducing Freud’ first, then follow on with the present course.)

Week 1: Jung (1): Introduction to the course: The nature and status of psychoanalysis. The conflict between Freud and Jung over the foundations of psychoanalysis. Freud’s ‘Totem and Taboo’ versus Jung’s ‘Symbols of Transformation’.

Week 2: Jung (2): Freud’s relation to Schopenhauer and Jung’s relation to Nietzsche, and how this leads to Jung’s theory of ‘individuation’ and the self, versus Freud’s conception of the ego and the ‘personal’ unconscious. Jung’s ‘Personality Types’ and the requirement of the ‘training analysis’ for all analysts.

Week 3: Jung (3): Jung’s view of development across the life-cycle: his interpretation of Dante’s ‘Divine Comedy’. The function of religion, and of art, according to Jung and Freud. Relationships and sexuality in the Jungian perspective.

Week 4: Klein (1): Klein’s approach to the psychoanalysis of children versus the approach of Anna Freud. The beginnings of the Kleinian revolution in psychoanalysis: the world of the infant within the child. The challenge to the Freudian conception of the Oedipus complex.

Week 5: Klein (2): Klein’s interpretation of Freud’s ‘Eros’ and ‘Thanatos’, and her view of how these conflicting forces play themselves out in the inner world of the very young child. The ‘Paranoid-Schizoid position’ and the ‘Depressive position’. Klein’s ‘Envy and Gratitude’. Klein and Bion.

Week 6: Klein (3): Klein’s view of sexuality and gender, and her critique of Freud’s view of the difference between the sexes. ‘Penis envy’ and ‘Womb envy’: a ‘mother centred’ psychoanalysis, as opposed to the ‘father centred’ psychoanalysis of Freud. Karen Horney’s critique of Freud. The Kleinian view of art and of society.

Week 7: Winnicott (1): Winnicott’s critique of Klein: the crucial importance of the early environment in the development of the infant. ‘Primary maternal preoccupation’, ‘Holding’, ‘Handling’ and ‘Personalization’ in early development. The ‘true self’, the ‘false self’, and ‘going on being’.

Week 8: Winnicott (2): Winnicott’s concept of the ‘Transitional Object’: transitional phenomena and the ‘intermediate area of experience’. Winncott’s understanding of art, culture and religion. Play and the nature of psychotherapy. Winnicott, Bion and Beckett.

Week 9: Winnicott (3): A Winnicottian view of the difference between the sexes. Gender and science; science versus art; the two cultures and their relation to sexuality. The nature of psychoanalysis, and psychotherapy, and their relation to science and to art.

Week 10: Lacan (1): The Lacanian revolution: the function of speech and language in psychoanalysis, and the fateful significance of the ‘mirror stage’. How the unconscious is ‘structured like a language’.

Week 11: Lacan (2): Lacan’s three ‘orders’: the imaginary, symbolic and real. The primacy of the symbolic: psychoanalysis as the study of our relationship to language. The Lacanian understanding of neurosis and psychosis.

Week 12: Lacan (3): ‘The meaning of the phallus’: Lacan’s view of sexuality and gender. A return to a ‘father centred’ psychoanalysis? Irigaray’s critique of Freud and Lacan. Jacqueline Rose on Lacan and Klein. Lacan on Love.

Admission

Full price: £190

Friends of the Museum: £160

Students/concessions: £130

Website

https://freud.org.uk/events/76887/psychoanalysis-after-freud/

Audrey Hepburn

PROJECTIONS: Neurosis on Film

  • 19 February — 26 March 2018 *on now

Six-week evening course

Scottish physician William Cullen first employed the term ‘neurosis’ in 1769 to summarise "general diseases of the sense or motion" where there appeared to be no observable organic cause. Sigmund Freud redefined and popularised the neurosis diagnosis in the 20th century, developing it as a central construct in psychoanalytic theory and practice.
PROJECTIONS is psychoanalysis for film interpretation.

PROJECTIONS empowers film spectators to express subjective associations they consider to be meaningful. Expertise in psychoanalytic theory is not necessary - the only prerequisite is the desire to enter and inhabit the imaginary world of film, which is itself a psychoanalytic act. MARY WILD, a Freudian cinephile from Montreal, is the creator of PROJECTIONS.


Advance viewing is optional, select scenes and montages will be shown during weekly sessions (see filmography below).

Week 1 – HYSTERIA: Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961), Opening Night (1977), Belle De Jour (1967)
Week 2 – OBSESSIONAL NEUROSIS: Brokeback Mountain (2005), Blade Runner 2049 (2017), Four Weddings and a Funeral (1994)
Week 3 – MELANCHOLIA: Les Amours Imaginaires (2010), Knight Of Cups (2015), A Single Man (2009)
Week 4 – LINGUISTIC BLOCK: Deconstructing Harry (1997), Synecdoche, New York (2008), Adaptation (2002)
Week 5 – EXISTENTIAL ANGST: Seconds (1966), Into the Wild (2007), The Zero Theorem (2013)
Week 6 – ETERNAL RETURN: Vertigo (1958), Interstellar (2014), The Duke of Burgundy (2014)

Admission

BOOKING
Full Price: £100
Friend of the Museum: £75
Student/unwaged: £75

Website

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/projections-neurosis-on-film-tickets-41234803407

Image of Black Book(2017) Gideon Rubin

BLACK BOOK: Sacha Craddock in conversation with artist Gideon Rubin

  • 20 February 2018 7-9pm

Art critic and writer Sacha Craddock will be in conversation with artist Gideon Rubin about his Freud Museum project BLACK BOOK and discussing the way propaganda is used to generate racial conflict, which in turn affects the plight of asylum seekers and refugees.

The conversation will be moderated by curator James Putnam.

The artist’s specially created project for Freud’s final home relates to the era of the late 1930s, when Freud left Vienna for London. A series of paintings on canvas, linen and paper take inspiration drawn from original pre-WW2 German magazines that Rubin has collected. The idealised images of heath and efficiency in the magazines were designed to promote the myth of Aryan supremacy in Nazi propaganda. Rubin has subverted these images in his characteristic style by masking out the faces, Nazi references and swastika motifs. The process relates to our human tendency to block out unpleasant memories from our psyche.

BLACK BOOK is the latest exhibition in a critically acclaimed series curated by James Putnam on display at the Museum from 7 February - 15 April 2018.

Admission

Full Price £10
Friends of the Museum £7
Students / concessions £7

Advanced booking highly recommended.

Website

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/black-book-sacha-craddock-in-conversation-with-artist-gideon-rubin-tickets-42426295191

young Anna Freud black and white image

Anna Freud Tour for International Women's Day

  • 7 March 2018 2-2:30pm

To help commemorate International Women's Day on the 8th March, this tour will introduce you to the many and subtle ways in which aspects of Anna's personality and relationships are reflected throughout the House. Share a closer look at some of the displays, explore examples of her achievements and reflect on the continuing relevance of her pioneering work.

Admission

Free event with admission.

Admission Charges
Adults: £8.00
Senior Citizens: £6.00
Concessions: £4.00 (students with valid ID cards, children aged 12-16, UK unemployed persons - with proof, disabled persons)
Children under 12: Free

Website

https://freud.org.uk/events/77113/anna-freud-tour-for-international-womens-day/

Book cover - Freud Museum London

Inside the Freud Museums: History, Memory & Site-Responsive Art

  • 8 March 2018 6:30-9pm

Art historian and theorist Joanne Morra will give a reading from her book Inside the Freud Museums: History, Memory and Site-responsive Art (IB Tauris, 2018). She will be joined by cultural theorist and artist Mieke Bal, and artists Susan Hiller and Michelle Williams Gamaker who will speak about their respective exhibitions at the Freud Museum London.

The talks and discussion will be followed by a drinks reception marking the launch of the publication.

This event has been generously supported by Research at Central Saint Martins, Central Saint Martins' Art Programme (University of the Arts London), and IB Tauris.



About the book:

Sigmund Freud spent the final year of his life at 20 Maresfield Gardens, London, surrounded by all his possessions, in exile from the Nazis. The long-term home and workspace he left behind in Berggasse 19, Vienna is a seemingly empty space, devoid of the great psychoanalyst's objects and artefacts. Now museums, both of these spaces resonate powerfully.

Since 1989, the Freud Museum London has held over 90 exhibitions by a distinctive range of artists including Mieke Bal & Michelle Williams Gamaker, Louise Bourgeois, Sophie Calle, Susan Hiller, and Sarah Lucas. The Sigmund Freud Museum Vienna houses a small but impressive contemporary art collection, with work by John Baldessari, Joseph Kosuth, Jenny Holzer, Franz West and Ilya Kabakov. In this remarkable book, Joanne Morra offers a nuanced analysis of these historical museums and their unique relationships to contemporary art.

Taking us on a journey through the ‘site-responsive' artworks, exhibitions and curatorial practices that intervene in the objects, spaces and memories of these museums, Joanne Morra offers a fresh experience of the history and practice of psychoanalysis, of museums and contemporary art.

Inside the Freud Museums: History, Memory and Site-Responsive Art is available from the Freud Museum Shop >

Admission

Full Price: £10
Friends of the Museum: £8
Students/unwaged: £8

Website

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/inside-the-freud-museums-history-memory-and-site-responsive-art-tickets-42669669129

sculpture - eros

Freud & the Ancient World

  • 17 March 2018 10am-5pm

Everyone has heard of the Oedipus complex. Freud's ideas have left a profound impression on the modern cultural imagination. But where did Freud's Oedipus come from? And how did he come up with the phallic mother? How did Freud invent a new way of reading literature and art? And what intellectual history made Freud's psychoanalysis of religion and civilisation possible?

Just as Freud exhorted us to search out the origins of our desires and identities - to become a modern Oedipus - so this series of public lectures excavates the origins of Freud's ideas. We will learn that there would have been no psychoanalysis without Freud's obsession with the ancient world.

First session: examines the importance of ancient ideas about desire and pleasure for Freud's understanding of gender and sexuality.

Second session: will consider the significance of ancient texts for Freud's discussions of literature and art.

Third session: will look at how Freud's discussions of Judaism, Christianity and modern civilisation emerged out of his interest in ancient religion. When Freud formulated the contours of the modern individual in modern society, he could not help but look back to antiquity to understand who we are.

Dr Daniel Orrells is Reader in Ancient Literature and Its Reception at King's College London, where he is Head of the Department of Classics. His research examines the presence of classical antiquity in modern cultural, literary and intellectual history. His most recent book 'Sex: Antiquity and its Legacy' offers a fresh, new narrative about the importance of the ancient world for the development of sexology and psychoanalysis

Dr Daniel Orrells' book 'Sex: Antiquity and it Legacy' is available from the Museum shop.

9.30am - open
10am - first session
12pm - lunch break
12.45pm - second session
2.45pm - tea break
3pm - third session
5pm - finish

Tea and coffee will be provided during both breaks. Please note: there is no cafe on site, however, you are welcome to bring your own lunch, which can be consumed in the classroom, or the Museum garden if the weather is fine.

more info:
https://freud.org.uk/events/77031/freud-the-ancient-world/

Admission

BOOKING

Full Price £70
Friend of the Museum £55
Students/senior citizen/unwaged £50
Student Friend of the Museum £45

Website

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/freud-and-the-ancient-world-day-course-tickets-39446337056

example of crafted animal

Monster Love: Facing Fauna Phobia

  • 24 March 2018 1-3pm

This workshop invites participants to bring out and tackle irrational other-than-human animal fears through crafting. The aim is to reduce biophobia, and encourage in its place biophilia and nature connection (Kellert & Wilson, 1993). The process has its roots in exposure therapy with the core protocol that one should ‘go towards that which you are afraid of’ (Wilson, 2012).

In spending time reflecting on the features of one’s fear, and drawing, cutting and sewing a cuddly version of it, there is keen potential to shift from a negative to a positive belief system. The resultant artefact prolongs the exposure experience, serving in intention to reduce the twin phobia components – fear and disgust (Richard & Lauterbach, 2006), before becoming a memento, a souvenir that commemorates one’s taming of a personal monster.

Monster Love forms part of a practice-based research programme undertaken by Sarah Johnson, a Design PhD student at Kingston School of Art. Participants will be requested to undertake a brief ‘connection to nature’ task pre- and post-workshop, and complete a short debriefing questionnaire/interview.

Research design will be given full ethics clearance by Kingston University ahead of the workshop. Sarah’s research is funded by the London Doctoral Design Centre and can be found here.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

Admission

Booking:
Free with admission - it is necessary to reserve places on Eventbrite in advance
https://freud.org.uk/events/77065/monster-love-facing-fauna-phobia/

Admission:
Adults: £8
Seniors: £6
Students: £4
Children under 12: Free

Website

https://freud.org.uk/events/77065/monster-love-facing-fauna-phobia/

Eros Sculpture

Psychoanalysis and Philosophy

  • 19 April — 5 July 2018

Freud was famously ambivalent about philosophy: on the one hand, pouring scorn on academic philosophers who dismissed the notion of the unconscious mind on the pretext that it involved a logical contradiction – while on the other, stating proudly in his autobiography that after a long detour through medicine and psychotherapy he had finally returned to the philosophical preoccupations of his youth. The course will examine the ways in which psychoanalysis and philosophy inform each other, and intersect with each other - sometimes in mutual support and sometimes in sharp conflict. We begin with the great philosophers of the past who influenced and inspired Freud and later psychoanalysts, then, in the second half of the course, turn to contemporary philosophers who have reflected on psychoanalysis, either critically, or with the aim of clarifying the nature of its contribution to the understanding of the human condition.

Tutor: Keith Barrett BA PhD - having received his PhD from the Wellcome Centre for the History of Medicine at University College London, Dr Barrett specialises in both philosophy and psychoanalysis and has taught at several leading institutions, including Imperial College and Birkbeck College.

Week 1: Introduction. Freud’s study of philosophy as an undergraduate. The deep philosophical background to the emergence of psychoanalysis: the Enlightenment vision vs Romanticism.

Week 2: Schopenhauer. The formative influence on Freud’s thinking of the philosophy of Schopenhauer. ‘The World as Will and Representation’.

Week 3: Nietzsche. Anticipations of psychoanalysis in the philosophy of Nietzsche. Freud and Jung and their different relationships to Nietzsche. Psychoanalysing philosophy.

Week 4: Plato. ‘Eros’ in Plato and Freud. Freud’s view of homosexuality and Plato’s philosophy. Plato’s ‘Symposium’. Freud between Plato and Nietzsche.

Week 5: Spinoza. Sometimes referred to as ‘the philosopher of psychoanalysis’, we will examine Spinoza’s understanding of the mind/body relationship, and his views on freedom and happiness. Spinoza’s ‘Ethics’

Week 6: Popper and Grunbaum. The 20th century debate over the scientific status of psychoanalysis. Grunbaum’s ‘The Philosophical Foundations of Psychoanalysis’

Week 7: Ricoeur and Habermas. The debate over the interpretation of psychoanalysis as hermeneutics. Ricoeur’s ‘Freud and Philosophy’

Week 8: Levinas and Buber. Psychoanalysis and the philosophy of the ethical relation to the other. Levinas’ ‘Totality and Infinity’ and Buber’s ‘I and Thou’

Week 9: Marcuse and Girard. Philosophical responses to Freud’s analysis of society. Marcuse’s ‘Eros and Civilisation’ and Girard’s ‘Violence and the Sacred’. Freud and violence.

Week 10: Foucault. Foucault’s earlier view of psychoanalysis in ‘Madness and Civilisation’, and his later view in ‘History of Sexuality, vol 1’.

Week 11: Lacan. Lacan’s appropriation of philosophy for the ends of psychoanalysis. Hegel, Heidegger and Freud, according to Lacan.

Week 12: Derrida. Derrida’s relation to psychoanalysis. Derrida vs Lacan. Derrida in the Freud archives: ‘Archive Fever’

RECOMMENDED READING

Gomez, L. ‘The Freud Wars: an introduction to the philosophy of psychoanalysis’ (Routledge 2005)

Ricoeur, P. ‘On Psychoanalysis’ (Polity 2012)

Orange, D.M. ‘Thinking for clinicians: philosophical resources for contemporary psychoanalysis and the humanistic psychotherapies’ (Routledge 2010)

Braddock, L. ‘The academic face of psychoanalysis: papers in philosophy, the & Lacewing, M. (Eds) the humanities and the British clinical tradition’ (Routledge 2007)

Cavell, M. ‘Becoming a subject: reflections in philosophy and psychoanalysis’ (Oxford UP 2006)

Tauber, A. ‘Freud, the reluctant philosopher’ (Princeton U.P. 2010)

Seung, T.K. ‘Nietzsche’s epic of the soul: Thus Spoke Zarathustra’ (Lexington Books 2005)

Chapelle, D. Nietzsche and psychoanalysis’ (SUNY Press 1993)

Della Rocca, M. ‘Spinoza’ (Routledge 2008)

Janaway, C. ‘Schopenhauer’ (Oxford U.P. 1994)

Beck, M.C. ‘The quest for wisdom in Plato and Carl Jung: a comparative study of the healers of the soul’ (Edwin Mellen Press 2008)

Grunbaum, A. ‘The Foundations of psychoanalysis: A philosophical Critique’ (U of California P 1984)

Habermas, J. ‘Knowledge and Human Interests’ (Heineman 1972)

Mills, J. (Ed) ‘Rereading Freud: psychoanalysis through philosophy’ (SUNY Press 2004)

Frie, R. ‘Subjectivity and intersubjectivity in modern philosophy and psychoanalysis: a study of Sartre, Binswanger, Lacan and Habermas’ (Rowman & Littlefield 1997)

Admission

Full price: £190

Friends of the Museum: £160

Students/concessions: £130

Advance booking essential
https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/psychoanalysis-and-philosophy-12-week-evening-course-tickets-42037065996

Website

https://freud.org.uk/events/77083/psychoanalysis-and-philosophy/

event image

The Psychoanalytic Organization and the Lacanian School

  • 25 April 2018 7-8:30pm

This talk will consider the history of psychoanalytic organizations and the Lacanian school as an organization, beginning with a review of Lacan’s trajectory in attempting to develop a new psychoanalytic organization consistent with the discourse of the analyst. Lacan was interested in alternative organizations in which hierarchical authority is balanced against a circular structure composed of communal, libertarian, and solidaristic forms of symbolic exchange.

The examination of Lacan’s innovations with respect to the psychoanalytic organization will be considered within the context of his contributions to psychoanalysis and how they address the current predicaments of the psychoanalytic field. Along the way we will show how Lacan’s work on the psychoanalytic organization is indebted to Bion’s work groups.

We will continue with a critical appraisal of what worked and what didn’t work in Lacan’s organization that resulted in Lacan’s dissolution of his school. Finally, we will consider the conditions under which after Lacan, a Lacanian school has been established in the US within the context of the current state of the larger international Lacanian movement. In fact, Lacan’s efforts never actually deviated from the three functions that Eitingon (1922-1925) originally assigned to a psychoanalytic clinic: therapeutic, formative, and research.

Raul Moncayo, Ph.D.
Supervising analyst of the Lacanian School of Psychoanalysis of the San Francisco, Bay Area in California. Private practice of psychoanalysis, control analysis, and consultation. Dr. Moncayo teaches a year-long Seminar at the Lacan School, has been adjunct faculty in several local universities over the years, still supervises doctoral dissertations, and has also been a visiting professor at North American, European, and South American universities. Dr. Moncayo is the author of five books, and this year’s presentation at the Freud Museum will draw from a chapter (co-authored with Dany Nobus) from a new book to be released by Palgrave Mcmillan in 2018.

Dany Nobus, Ph.D.
Psychoanalyst, Chair of Psychoanalysis at Brunel University London, and Chair of the Freud Museum London. He is the author of Jacques Lacan and the Freudian Practice of Psychoanalysis (Routledge, 2000), Knowing Nothing, Staying Stupid: Elements for a Psychoanalytic Epistemology (with Malcolm Quinn) (Routledge, 2005), and The Law of Desire: On Lacan's "Kant with Sade" (Palgrave, 2017). He has also contributed numerous papers on the history, theory and practice of psychoanalysis to academic and professional journals.

Admission

Full price: £11
Friend of the Museum: £9
Student/unwaged: £9

Advance booking required
https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/the-psychoanalytic-organization-and-the-lacanian-school-tickets-43124903748

Website

https://freud.org.uk/events/77117/the-psychoanalytic-organization-and-the-lacanian-school/

Freud Museum London
20 Maresfield Gardens
London
Greater London
NW3 5SX
England

Website

www.freud.org.uk/

E-mail

info@freud.org.uk

Telephone

020 7435 2002

Fax

020 7431 5452

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
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