Freud Museum London

Freud's couch
Shop icon Library icon Study area icon Wheelchair access icon

Listed house in Hampstead where Sigmund Freud and his family lived after fleeing the Nazis in 1938. The Museum was founded in 1986. It has featured in numerous films and TV broadcasts and hosts regular exhibitions and events. It is available for hire for filming and evening functions.

Venue Type:

Museum

Opening hours

Wed 12.00-20.30
Thurs-Sun 12.00-17.00

Admission charges

Adults: £8.00
Senior Citizens: £6
Concs: £4.00 (with valid student ID card, children aged 12-16, unemployed persons, disabled persons)
Under 12s: Free

Discounts

  • Museums Association

Additional info

Our library, study and research facilities are open by appointment only.

Sigmund Freud's large collection of Egyptian, Greek, Roman and Oriental antiquities and his library. His study with the psychoanalytic couch preserve his working environment. A reference library, archive and picture library document the history of psychoanalysis.

Collection details

Archaeology, Archives, Costume and Textiles, Decorative and Applied Art, Fine Art, Personalities, Social History

Key artists and exhibits

  • Freud's couch; Dali portrait of Freud; Brouillet print of Charcot; Abu Simbel print; photographs of Yvette Guilbert, Princess Marie Bonaparte, Lou Andreas-Salome, Charcot, Freud family.
Events details are listed below. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all. For events that don't have a specific date see the 'Resources' tab above.
animation woman in blue dress at a desk sat on top of a brain, screaming in shock at a skeleton

Tricky Women: Turbulent Times, Trusted Places

  • 12 December 2017 5:30-8:30pm

Film screening

In recent years, hardly any other form of art has influenced everyday visual perception as much as animation in its various facets. The Freud Museum London and the Austrian Cultural Forum present a specially curated programme of films from this year’s festival entitled Turbulent Times, Trusted Places.

The programme presents a variety of different animation films and filmmakers, which, in their different ways, contemplate enduring questions around place and space. What is it like to arrive in a new city (Shut up Moon, Gudrun Krebitz) or to explore a city together with magical creatures made of recycled and discarded objects (Taipei Recyclers, Nikki Schuster). Other films explore human emotions such as greed which destroys our social connections as well as environmental consciousness (Princess Disaster Movie, Xenia Ostrovskaya und YACHAY, Anne Zwiener), The effect of loneliness on the periphery (Ginny, Susi Jirkuff); the unpredictability of love (The infatuated cook, Verena Hochleitner & Ulrike Swoboda-Ostermann). While other films tell touching family stories (Garten & Schnaps, Amelie Loy), and how women take control of their own destinies (Two Melons – Birth of an Artist, Ingrid Gaier).

On the occasion of the exhibition ‘So this is the Strong Sex’ Women in Psychoanalysis at the Freud Museum London, we present a programme of films celebrating female artistic production as well as the variety of styles, approaches, techniques and themes within the genre.

Programme:

The infatuated cook (Zamilovaný kuchař), Directed by: Verena Hochleitner, Ulrike Swoboda-Ostermann (AT 2013, 10 min.)
Follow You, Regie: Katharina Petsche (AT 2013, 4 min.)
Gaden & Schnaps (Zahrada & pálenka), Regie: Amelie Loy (AT 2013, 12 min.)
Ginny, Regie: Susi Jirkuff (AT 2015, 5 min.)
Machine, Regie: Anna Vasof (AT 2015, 2 min.)
Princess Disaster Movie, Regie: Xenia Ostrovskaya (AT 2014, 4 min.)
Shut up Moon, Regie: Gudrun Krebitz (AT 2014, 4 min.)
Taipei Recyclers, Regie: Nikki Schuster (AT 2014, 7 min.)
Two Melons – Birth of an Artist, Regie: Ingrid Gaier (AT 2014, 2 min.)
YachaY, Regie: Anne Zwiener (AT 2015, 7 min.)

https://www.trickywomen.at/

The Freud Museum London, in conjunction with the Austrian Cultural Forum, are proud to host a special film evening featuring a selection of animated short films by female filmmakers to accompany our forthcoming exhibition 'So This is the Strong Sex' Women in Psychoanalysis, opening 29 November 2017.

The featured films were first screened at the Tricky Women International Animation Film Festival in Vienna earlier this year.

Admission

Tickets:
£11.66 - £13.75

Website

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/tricky-women-turbulent-times-trusted-places-tickets-39725071759?aff=es2

Original ergonomic chair from Freud's study

Psychoanalysis After Freud

  • 11 January — 29 March 2018

Psychoanalysis was initiated by Freud, then transformed by a series of powerful creative figures who both extended and deepened its range, opening new intellectual horizons as they applied its methods to new problems and new fields. We will focus on four leading innovators, carefully examining their criticisms of Freud and the manner in which they modified his theories and therapeutic practice. In this way, the course will give an overview of the development of psychoanalysis across its first century and into the beginning of its second. While intended to be accessible to beginners, it will also stimulate those who already have some knowledge of the field.

(The course is self-contained – as is ‘Introducing Freud at the Freud Museum’ which precedes it in the autumn term. The two courses can be taken in either order, or as ‘stand alone’ modules, but complete beginners wanting a thorough introduction to psychoanalysis should take ‘Introducing Freud’ first, then follow on with the present course.)

Week 1: Jung (1): Introduction to the course: The nature and status of psychoanalysis. The conflict between Freud and Jung over the foundations of psychoanalysis. Freud’s ‘Totem and Taboo’ versus Jung’s ‘Symbols of Transformation’.

Week 2: Jung (2): Freud’s relation to Schopenhauer and Jung’s relation to Nietzsche, and how this leads to Jung’s theory of ‘individuation’ and the self, versus Freud’s conception of the ego and the ‘personal’ unconscious. Jung’s ‘Personality Types’ and the requirement of the ‘training analysis’ for all analysts.

Week 3: Jung (3): Jung’s view of development across the life-cycle: his interpretation of Dante’s ‘Divine Comedy’. The function of religion, and of art, according to Jung and Freud. Relationships and sexuality in the Jungian perspective.

Week 4: Klein (1): Klein’s approach to the psychoanalysis of children versus the approach of Anna Freud. The beginnings of the Kleinian revolution in psychoanalysis: the world of the infant within the child. The challenge to the Freudian conception of the Oedipus complex.

Week 5: Klein (2): Klein’s interpretation of Freud’s ‘Eros’ and ‘Thanatos’, and her view of how these conflicting forces play themselves out in the inner world of the very young child. The ‘Paranoid-Schizoid position’ and the ‘Depressive position’. Klein’s ‘Envy and Gratitude’. Klein and Bion.

Week 6: Klein (3): Klein’s view of sexuality and gender, and her critique of Freud’s view of the difference between the sexes. ‘Penis envy’ and ‘Womb envy’: a ‘mother centred’ psychoanalysis, as opposed to the ‘father centred’ psychoanalysis of Freud. Karen Horney’s critique of Freud. The Kleinian view of art and of society.

Week 7: Winnicott (1): Winnicott’s critique of Klein: the crucial importance of the early environment in the development of the infant. ‘Primary maternal preoccupation’, ‘Holding’, ‘Handling’ and ‘Personalization’ in early development. The ‘true self’, the ‘false self’, and ‘going on being’.

Week 8: Winnicott (2): Winnicott’s concept of the ‘Transitional Object’: transitional phenomena and the ‘intermediate area of experience’. Winncott’s understanding of art, culture and religion. Play and the nature of psychotherapy. Winnicott, Bion and Beckett.

Week 9: Winnicott (3): A Winnicottian view of the difference between the sexes. Gender and science; science versus art; the two cultures and their relation to sexuality. The nature of psychoanalysis, and psychotherapy, and their relation to science and to art.

Week 10: Lacan (1): The Lacanian revolution: the function of speech and language in psychoanalysis, and the fateful significance of the ‘mirror stage’. How the unconscious is ‘structured like a language’.

Week 11: Lacan (2): Lacan’s three ‘orders’: the imaginary, symbolic and real. The primacy of the symbolic: psychoanalysis as the study of our relationship to language. The Lacanian understanding of neurosis and psychosis.

Week 12: Lacan (3): ‘The meaning of the phallus’: Lacan’s view of sexuality and gender. A return to a ‘father centred’ psychoanalysis? Irigaray’s critique of Freud and Lacan. Jacqueline Rose on Lacan and Klein. Lacan on Love.

Admission

Full price: £190

Friends of the Museum: £160

Students/concessions: £130

Website

https://freud.org.uk/events/76887/psychoanalysis-after-freud/

Promo Image from Mother

PROJECTIONS: Darren Aronofsky - The Cinema of Obsession

  • 22 January 2018 7-9pm
  • 29 January 2018 7-9pm
  • 5 February 2018 7-9pm

American film director Darren Aronofsky was once asked if he deliberately aims to make audiences feel uncomfortable. He replied, “I definitely want to make them feel something. I'm inspired by the Cyclone roller coaster in Coney Island, where I grew up. It is the greatest ride in the world. I've always tried to construct my films with the same structure: intense, on the edge of your seat.”

The influence of cinema masters Polanski, Buñuel and Cronenberg is evident in Aronofsky’s ambitious oeuvre, which is built on representing extreme states: isolationists preoccupied with abstract intellectual concepts, addicts consumed with the desire to chase the next mind bending high, public performers who brutally push their bodies and psyches beyond the edge. Aronofsky’s recent release, mother!, is a strikingly violent metaphor that makes the Cyclone roller coaster seem like a walk in the park. Reactions to his films are mixed - spectators either love or loathe the controversial auteur; he certainly isn’t for the faint of heart!

In this 3-week lecture series, six of Aronofsky’s films will be examined in categories relating to Fixation, Performance and Cosmology, referencing psychoanalytic concepts to shed light on the running theme of obsession throughout his body of work. We will engage closely with the director’s signature style (a combination of melodrama, psychological horror, fantasy and surrealism) as he portrays the devastating pitfalls and amplified pleasures of being driven by a singular, extreme passion. The motif of obsession communicates yearning, pain and love in a supercharged way - it is difficult to name a modern director who surpasses Aronofsky in authentically representing this overwhelming emotional experience on film.

Advance viewing is optional, select scenes and montages will be shown during weekly sessions (see filmography below).

Week 1 - FIXATION
Pi (1998): A paranoid mathematician searches for a primer that will unlock the universal patterns found in nature.
Requiem For A Dream (2000): The drug-induced utopias of four Coney Island characters are shattered when their addictions spin out of control.

Week 2 - PERFORMANCE
The Wrestler (2008): A faded professional wrestler must retire, but finds his quest for a new life outside the ring a dispiriting struggle.
Black Swan (2010): A committed dancer wins the lead role in a production of Tchaikovsky's Swan Lake only to find herself struggling to maintain her sanity.

Week 3 - COSMOLOGY
The Fountain (2006): A modern-day scientist struggles with mortality, desperately searching for the medical breakthrough that will save the life of his cancer-stricken wife.
mother! (2017): A couple's relationship is tested when uninvited guests arrive at their home, disrupting their tranquil existence.

PROJECTIONS is psychoanalysis for film interpretation. PROJECTIONS empowers film spectators to express subjective associations they consider to be meaningful. Expertise in psychoanalytic theory is not necessary - the only prerequisite is the desire to enter and inhabit the imaginary world of film, which is itself a psychoanalytic act.

MARY WILD, a Freudian cinephile from Montreal, is the creator of PROJECTIONS.

Admission

Full Price: £45
Students/senior citizens/unwaged: £36
Friends of the Museum: £36

Website

https://freud.org.uk/events/77022/projections-darren-aronofsky-the-cinema-of-obsession/

Book Cpver of Freud's Women

Freud's Women

  • 31 January 2018 7-8:30pm

Despite Freud’s traditional views on women, psychoanalysis was one of the first professions to open its doors to them. Feminists past and present may have contested Freud’s ever-changing understandings of femininity. They have also elaborated on them.

In this discussion, Lisa Appignanesi co-author of the now classic Freud’s Women and psychoanalyst Susie Orbach, founder of the Women’s Therapy Centre and author of that perennial bestseller Fat is A Feminist Issue explore what women past and present have contributed to psychoanalysis.

Freud's Women is held in conjunction with the Freud Museum London's winter exhibition, So This is the Strong Sex, Early Women Psychoanalysts.



ABOUT THE SPEAKERS
Lisa Appignanesi is Chair of the Royal Society of Literature and the Man Booker International Prize. Her many books include Mad, Bad and Sad: A History of Women and the Mind Doctors and Trials of Passion: Crimes in the Name of Love and Madness.

Susie Orbach is a leading psychoanalyst. Amongst her many books are Bodies and In Therapy. Founder of the Women's Therapy Centre and the Women's Therapy Centre Institute, Susie has recently received the first ever Lifetime Achievement Award from the British Psychoanalytic Council.

Admission

Full Price £12
Friends of the Museum £10
Students / concessions £10

Freud Museum London
20 Maresfield Gardens
London
Greater London
NW3 5SX
England

Website

www.freud.org.uk/

E-mail

info@freud.org.uk

Telephone

020 7435 2002

Fax

020 7431 5452

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
advertisement