Florence Nightingale Museum

Florence Nightingale Museum
2 Lambeth Palace Road
South Bank
London
Greater London
SE1 7EW
England

Website

www.florence-nightingale.co.uk

E-mail

General enquiries

info@florence-nightingale.co.uk

Curatorial enquiries

curator@florence-nightingale.co.uk

Telephone

(020) 7620 0374

Fax

(020) 7928 1760

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
Exterior of the Museum at night, showing Big Ben in the distance
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Discover the woman behind the legend.

Did you know?
* Florence Nightingale did not want to become famous and disliked sitting for portraits or photographs
* She struggled for years to persuade her parents to let her become a nurse
* As well as caring for people, she loved animals and even carried a pet owl around in her pocket

Born into a wealthy family Florence Nightingale yearned for more than the typical Victorian lady’s lifestyle. Now an internationally recognised figure, her reputation is well deserved.

At the Florence Nightingale Museum you will discover how her impact has been far-reaching in so many fields. She is remembered throughout the world for her work during the Crimean War and as the founder of modern nursing, although this was actually only a fraction of her achievement.

Find out about a passionate statistician, writer, campaigner, educationalist and hospital planner whose legacy lives on into the 21st century. Original objects include personal mementos, including her pet owl Athena, prints, paintings, souvenirs from the Crimean War and symbols of nursing.

A video, guided tours, activity sheets for children and regular events will help you to make the most of your visit.

Venue Type:

Museum

Opening hours

Daily 10.00-17.00

Closed: Good Friday, Christmas Day, Boxing Day

Admission charges

Adults £5.80
Child / Concession £4.80
Children under 5: Free
Friends: Free
Family (2 adults + up to 5 children) £16.00
Group rates available (prebooked groups only)
GIFT AID
Make your admission fee go even further by giving through Gift Aid. The Museum can benefit from Tax Relief by claiming back from the Inland Revenue the basic rate of 28p tax for every £1.00 you give us. Once you sign up for Gift Aid you are entitled to one year’s free entry to the Museum, enabling you to enjoy our special events again and again!

To sign up for Gift Aid, the visitor needs to be a UK taxpayer and the amount they pay in income or capital gains tax must at least equal the amount the Museum will claim in the tax year.

Discounts

  • Museums Association

The collection has its origin in the 'Nightingalia' which was the pride of the Matrons of St Thomas' Hospital in Lambeth from the early twentieth century. It includes artefacts owned or used by Florence Nightingale, including her pet owl Athena and the medicine chest she took with her to the Crimea. It also includes material connected with the Crimean War, military, hospital and nursing objects connected with the Nightingale Training School and St Thomas' Hospital (1860-1910).

Collection details

Costume and Textiles, Fine Art, Medicine, Personalities, Photography, Social History, Weapons and War

Key artists and exhibits

  • Nursing
  • Crimean Nurses
  • Medical History
  • Crimean War
  • St Thomas' Hospital
  • Nightingale Training School
  • Simpson Lithographs
  • Victorian Costume
Exhibition details are listed below, you may need to scroll down to see them all.

The Hospital in the Oatfield - The Art of Nursing in the First World War

  • 13 March — 26 October 2014 *on now

The Florence Nightingale Museum will mark the centenary of the First World War with a special exhibition honouring the inspirational work of nurses in war-torn France.

The exhibition centres on a series of remarkable paintings by Victor Tardieu of the field hospital run by the Society beauty, Millicent, Duchess of Sutherland. The exhibition explores the crucial role played by women in the battlefields of France and Belgium and shows the incredible innovation displayed by nurses under challenging and dangerous conditions.

Entry to this exhibition is included in the ticket price for the Florence Nightingale Museum.

Suitable for

  • Any age

Admission

Exhibition entry is included in ticket price.

Website

http://www.florence-nightingale.co.uk/

Events details are listed below. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all. For events that don't have a specific date see the 'Resources' tab above.
a photo of a poppy next to gravestones

Edith Cavell: Nurse and Patriot

  • 28 April 2014 3:30-5pm

Edith stayed to nurse the wounded when Brussels was occupied by the German army, and she became part of a secret organisation which helped British and Belgian soldiers trying to escape. Cavell was arrested by the German secret police, and with other members of the escape network, was found guilty of war treason and shot on 12 October 1915. Jonathan Evans examines Edith's life and her impact on nursing, together with her influence on the war which saw her death used as a propaganda weapon.

Suitable for

  • Any age

Admission

Normal admission charges apply.

Website

http://www.florence-nightingale.co.uk/what-s-on/edith-cavell-nurse-and-patriot.html

Photograph of WW1 Nurses, Edith Cavell seated centre.

Veiled Warriors: Nursing in the First World War

  • 15 May 2014 6:30-8pm

Caring for the wounded of the First World War was tough and challenging work, demanding extensive knowledge, technical skill, and high levels of commitment.

Although allied nurses were admired in their own time for their altruism and courage, their image was distorted by the lens of popular mythology. They later came to be seen as self-sacrificing heroines, romantic foils to the male combatant and doctors' handmaidens, rather than being appreciated as trained professionals performing significant work in their own right.

Christine Hallett challenges these myths to reveal the true story of allied nursing in the First World War - one which is both more complex and more absorbing.

Suitable for

  • Any age

Admission

£8.00.

Website

http://www.florence-nightingale.co.uk/what-s-on/veiled-warriors.html

Photograph of WW1 Nurses, Edith Cavell seated centre.

The Redoubtable Millicent

  • 5 June 2014 3:30-5pm

Millicent Sutherland had a strong social conscience, but her interest in improving conditions for factory workers made her an embarrassment to her class and gender, earning her the nickname ‘Meddlesome Millie’. Widowhood in 1913 gave the Duchess increased independence and as soon as war was declared, she departed to France to establish an ambulance unit under the French Red Cross. With a small team of nurses in the French countryside, she cared for wounded soldiers in a series of locations, beautifully depicted by Victor Tardieu in a series of paintings now on display at the Museum.

Suitable for

  • Any age

Website

http://www.florence-nightingale.co.uk/what-s-on/the-redoubtable-millicent-duchess-of-sutherland-and-her-hospital-under-canvas.html

photograph of nurse Lily Cope

From Debutante to Drudgery

  • 10 July 2014 6:30-8pm

Nursing was one of the main ways that women could participate in the war effort, and many had romantic notions of sitting at the bedside of a wounded soldier, bringing him back to health. Women of all classes trained in various forms of nursing, but it was the aristocratic nurses who were often able to open their country houses as hospitals to provide care for wounded and convalescing soldiers. This talk will examine the relationship between the nurses, their patients and the vital role of the English stately home as a place of care during the First World War.

Suitable for

  • Any age

Admission

£8.00.

Website

http://www.florence-nightingale.co.uk/what-s-on/from-debutante-to-drudgery-nurses-and-stately-homes-in-the-first-world-war.html

Photograph of US nurses

Nursing Ancestors and the First World War

  • 31 July 2014 11am-5pm

Explore the wartime experiences of your nursing relative and learn how to trace her career, where to look for sources and how to find out more. Example documents and relevant computer databases will be on hand. Topics to explore include VAD nurses, military nurses, service records, medals and war graves. Please bring whatever details you have of your nursing ancestor - or feel free to ask general questions.

Suitable for

  • Any age

Website

http://www.florence-nightingale.co.uk/what-s-on/nursing-ancestors-and-the-first-world-war.html

black and white photograph of soldiers with trophies

The Fateful Year: England 1914

  • 5 August 2014 6:30-8pm

1914 was a year that took a sudden and dramatic turn for the unexpected for England. War with Germany, so often imagined and predicted, finally broke out when people were least prepared for it. Followed by question and answer session.

Suitable for

  • Any age

Admission

Admission price £8.00 (Members £5.00) and includes a glass of wine and a chance to view the museum. To book, please contact Katie Edwards on katie@florence-nightingale.co.uk or 020 7620 0374.

Website

http://www.florence-nightingale.co.uk/what-s-on/the-fateful-year-england-1914.html

Photograph of woman with a letter

The Lost Art of Letter Writing

  • 7 August 2014 1-4pm

Meet a First World War nurse and explore the role that letter writing played in the war at our free drop in session. Letters from home were a lifeline for both soldiers and the medical teams and nurses who cared for them, and the letters that nurses received and mean we can learn about their experiences. Practice your creative skills at this historic workshop.

Suitable for

  • Any age

Website

http://www.florence-nightingale.co.uk/what-s-on/the-lost-art-of-letter-writing.html

Resources listed here may include websites, bookable tours and workshops, books, loan boxes and more. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all.

Why do we remember Florence Nightingale?

Educational sessions to support KS1, unit 4. Three different sessions, Costume handling, using 5 replica costumes, 'A visit with Miss Nightingale', with an actress in character Miss Nightingale describes her life and what happened as a result of her work, and 'A Visit with Miss Nightingale's Maid', with an actress in character as 'Florrie', Florence Nightingale's maid describes what Miss Nightingale was really like and what life was like for a Victorian servant. With all sessions we offer a set of hands-on activities around the Museum including real and replica handling objects, photographs, prints and worksheets

How to obtain

Once a teacher has booked a session at the Museum the Primary Visit pack will be sent out. This contains all details about the visit and all photocopiable worksheets.
All other resources can be purchased from our shop.
To make a booking call the Museum on 020 7620 0374
For further information or to use our webshop visit our website www.florence-nightingale.co.uk

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