Tate Britain

Tate Britain
Millbank
London
Greater London
SW1P 4RG
England

Website

www.tate.org.uk/britain

E-mail

visiting.britain@tate.org.uk

Telephone

Switchboard

020 7887 8888

Recorded information

020 7887 8008

MIincom

020 7887 8687

Events and education

020 7887 8888

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
Tate Britain
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Tate Britain is the national gallery of British art from 1500 to the present day, from the Tudors to the Turner Prize.

Venue Type:

Gallery

Opening hours

Open everyday 10.00-17.50
Open until 22.00 on the first Friday of each month

Closed: 24, 25, 26 December

Admission charges

Entry is free except for major exhibitions

Discounts

  • International Council of Museums

Tate holds the greatest collection of British art in the world, including works by Blake, Constable, Epstein, Gainsborough, Gilbert & George, Hatoum, Hirst, Hockney, Hodgkin, Hogarth, Moore, Rossetti, Sickert, Spencer, Stubbs and Turner. The gallery is the world centre for the understanding and enjoyment of British art, and helps promote interest in British art internationally.

Collection details

Photography, Performing Arts, Fine Art, Film and Media, Archives

Key artists and exhibits

  • Blake
  • Constable
  • Epstein
  • Gainsborough
  • Gilbert & George
  • Hatoum
  • Hirst
  • Hockney
  • Hodgkin
  • Hogarth
  • Moore
  • Rossetti
  • Sickert
  • Spencer
  • Stubbs
  • Turner
Exhibition details are listed below, you may need to scroll down to see them all.
photogprah of tate britain

David Tremlett Drawing for Free Thinking

  • 19 September 2011 — 31 December 2016 *on now

Drawing for Free Thinking is a new wall drawing for Tate Britain, designed to wrap around the Manton stairwell. Inspired by the long tradition of twentieth-century constructivism and by David Tremlett’s involvement in conceptual art in the 1970s, Drawing for Free Thinking consists of broad blocks of strong colour, straight lines, squares and rectangles. It explores floor plans and architectural features the artist has encountered at the gallery such as doorways or windows abstracted into geometric shapes. Tremlett and his team of assistants work with pastel crayons which they rub directly onto the wall with the palms of their hands.

Admission

Free

Website

http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-britain/exhibition/david-tremlett-drawing-free-thinking

photogprah of tate britain

BP Spotlight: Keith Arnatt

  • 11 March 2013 — 11 August 2016 *on now

Keith Arnatt was a British conceptual artist who used photography as a way of documenting perfromative acts that question the status of art and the role of the artist. Using recent acquisitions, this display will show the range of Arnatt’s work and his singular use of photography, focusing on his work of the 1970s and 1980s.

Suitable for

Admission

Free

diagram of timeline for the darks at tate britian

The Darks: Ruth Ewan and Astrid Johnston

  • 6 June — 30 November 2014 *on now

Playing on the format of a museum audio guide, The Darks audio tour invites visitors to navigate the area around Tate Britain, once the site of the infamous Millbank Prison.

The original plan for Millbank Prison, which opened in 1816, was for a Panopticon. The design for such a building, conceived by Jeremy Bentham in the late 18thcentury, would allow a single watchman to observe all inmates of an institution.

The Panopticon has long been a byword for absolute power, discipline and control. The Darks audio tour touches on the utopian dream at its heart, and how this optimism switched into the hellish reality of what followed.

Narrated by Carolyn Pickles, this audio guide also features real and fictional accounts of passers-by, including novelist Charles Dickens and writer and reformer Henry Mayhew, inmates such as Irish political prisoner Dennis B Cashman (who was transported to Australia from Millbank) and one-time prison governor, Arthur Griffiths.

Words scratched onto coins by unknown prisoners are also heard among the fragmented voices that make up The Darks.

Website

http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-britain/exhibition/darks-ruth-ewan-and-astrid-johnston

Louise Bourgeois: Works on Paper

  • 16 June 2014 — 12 April 2015 *on now

A four-room display bringing together a selection of Louise Bourgeois' prints, drawings and books from different points of her career.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

Website

http://www.tate.org.uk/visit/tate-modern

Matisse Sunday Lates

  • 1 July — 31 December 2014 *on now

For the first time at Tate Modern, Sunday evenings will be set aside for a quieter exhibition viewing experience of Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs, with visitor numbers restricted from 20:00-22:30

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

Admission

Sundays

Website

http://www.tate.org.uk/visit/tate-modern

Olafur Eliasson: Turner Colour Experiments

  • 8 September 2014 — 25 January 2015 *on now

Eliasson has investigated JMW Turner’s use of light and colour, abstracting the hues of seven of his paintings into dynamic colour studies.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

Website

http://www.tate.org.uk/visit/tate-britain

Painting by JWM Turner of a steam train in the rain

Late Turner: Painting Set Free

  • 10 September 2014 — 25 January 2015 *on now

Late Turner: Painting Set Free reassesses Turner’s extraordinary body of work during his final period (1835–50) when some of his most celebrated works were created.

Beginning in 1835, the year that Turner reached 60, and closing with his last exhibits at the Royal Academy in 1850, the exhibition demonstrates how his closing years were a time of exceptional energy and vigour, initiated by one of his most extensive tours of Europe. Bringing together 150 works from the UK and abroad, it seeks to challenge assumptions around the idea of the ‘elderly’ artist, as well as his radical techniques, processes and materials during this productive time.

Featuring many large-scale oil paintings alongside drawings, prints and watercolour, the exhibition addresses the sheer range of materials and techniques he embraced. The show also includes such iconic works as Ancient Rome; Agrippina Landing with the Ashes of Germanicus exh. 1839, The Wreck Buoy 1849 and Heidelberg: Sunset c.1840 (Manchester City Galleries).

Suitable for

  • Any age

Website

http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-britain/exhibition/late-turner-painting-set-free

The Death of Chatterton 1859

‘Poor man’s picture gallery’: Victorian Art and Stereoscopic Photography

  • 13 October 2014 — 1 April 2015 *on now

‘Poor man’s picture gallery’: Victorian Art and Stereoscopic Photography is the first display in a major British art gallery devoted to early three-dimensional photography.

These ingenious but inexpensive stereograph pictures were a nineteenth century craze, circulating world-wide in tens of thousands and more.

Pioneers of the art form were quick to challenge fine art itself. Celebrated canvases of the age, such as Henry Wallis’s Chatterton and William Powell Frith’s Derby Day, were recreated in real depth.

This display brings twelve of Tate’s Victorian and Pre-Raphaelite works face to face with a rare collection of their three-dimensional doubles assembled by Brian May.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

Website

http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-britain/display/bp-spotlight-poor-mans-picture-gallery-victorian-art-and-stereoscopic

Salt and Silver: Early Photography 1840-1860

  • 25 February — 7 June 2015

Salt and Silver: Early Photography 1840-1860 is the first major exhibition in Britain devoted to salt prints, the earliest form of paper photography.

The exhibition features some of the rarest and best early photographs in the world, depicting daily activities and historic moments of the mid 19th century. The ninety photographs on display are among the few fragile salt prints that survive and are seldom shown in public.

Salt and Silver: Early Photography 1840-1860 opens at Tate Britain on 25 February 2015.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

Website

http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-britain/exhibition/salt-and-silver-early-photography-1840-1860

Events details are listed below. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all. For events that don't have a specific date see the 'Resources' tab above.

Sonic Trails

  • 1 July — 31 December 2014 *on now

Become absorbed in an unexpected audio environment, listen to the sounds of a sculpture or the hidden noises of Tate Modern by night.

Suitable for

Admission

Every Saturday and Sunday plus Thursdays and Fridays during school holidays

Website

http://www.tate.org.uk/visit/tate-modern

Families Welcome Room

  • 1 July — 31 December 2014 *on now

Drop-in to the Families Welcome Room for fun activities designed by artists just for you

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

Admission

Every Saturday and Sunday plus Thursdays and Fridays during school holidays

Website

http://www.tate.org.uk/visit/tate-modern

Open Studio

  • 1 July — 31 December 2014 *on now

Drop into Open Studio to spend time testing out some of the materials and processes associated with Tate Britain’s major exhibition British Folk Art.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

Admission

weekends and Thursday-Sunday during school holidays

Website

http://www.tate.org.uk/visit/tate-britain

Families Welcome Area and Sonic Trails

  • 1 July — 31 December 2014 *on now

Pick up activities inspired by Tate Britain’s major exhibition British Folk Art devised by artists and exploring how stories are put together, including a Sonic Trail and paper-based activity.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

Admission

weekends and Thursday-Sunday during school holidays

Website

http://www.tate.org.uk/visit/tate-britain

Resources listed here may include websites, bookable tours and workshops, books, loan boxes and more. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all.

My Imaginary City

http://kids.tate.org.uk/games/my-imaginary-city/

Artists use their imaginations to create scenes and places that are not real and that might never exist. If you could invent your own imaginary city what would it be like?

Schools and Teachers

http://www.tate.org.uk/schoolsteachers/

All the resources you need for teaching art in the classroom, from Teachers' Packs to teacher training.

Tate Webquests

http://nmolp.tate.org.uk/webquests/

Webquests are online activities for children, using the collections of nine national museums and galleries.

The Case of the Mysterious Object

http://www.tate.org.uk/detective/mysteriousobject.htm

The Silver Cage: Film

http://kids.tate.org.uk/films/film1.shtm

Inspired by Cornelia Parker's 'Thirty Pieces of Silver', the Art Sparks create their own work, 'The Silver Cage'. Watch the film to see what they did.

How to obtain

View online on the Tate Kids site.

The Zoom Room

http://www.tate.org.uk/schoolsteachers/zoomroom/

Welcome to the Zoom Room, where you can zoom into fresh ideas for making art. The Zoom Room contains an archive of informal art activities carried out by children in the Tate galleries. Get new ideas for making collages, creating snow globes, putting on performances, or carving soap sculptures. Tips are provided for children, explaining how to carry out these activities in the classroom or at home.

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