Tate Britain

Tate Britain
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Tate Britain is the national gallery of British art from 1500 to the present day, from the Tudors to the Turner Prize.

Venue Type:


Opening hours

Open everyday 10.00-17.50
Open until 22.00 on the first Friday of each month

Closed: 24, 25, 26 December

Admission charges

Entry is free except for major exhibitions


  • International Council of Museums

Tate holds the greatest collection of British art in the world, including works by Blake, Constable, Epstein, Gainsborough, Gilbert & George, Hatoum, Hirst, Hockney, Hodgkin, Hogarth, Moore, Rossetti, Sickert, Spencer, Stubbs and Turner. The gallery is the world centre for the understanding and enjoyment of British art, and helps promote interest in British art internationally.

Collection details

Photography, Performing Arts, Fine Art, Film and Media, Archives

Key artists and exhibits

  • Blake
  • Constable
  • Epstein
  • Gainsborough
  • Gilbert & George
  • Hatoum
  • Hirst
  • Hockney
  • Hodgkin
  • Hogarth
  • Moore
  • Rossetti
  • Sickert
  • Spencer
  • Stubbs
  • Turner
Exhibition details are listed below, you may need to scroll down to see them all.
photogprah of tate britain

David Tremlett Drawing for Free Thinking

  • 19 September 2011 — 31 December 2016 *on now

Drawing for Free Thinking is a new wall drawing for Tate Britain, designed to wrap around the Manton stairwell. Inspired by the long tradition of twentieth-century constructivism and by David Tremlett’s involvement in conceptual art in the 1970s, Drawing for Free Thinking consists of broad blocks of strong colour, straight lines, squares and rectangles. It explores floor plans and architectural features the artist has encountered at the gallery such as doorways or windows abstracted into geometric shapes. Tremlett and his team of assistants work with pastel crayons which they rub directly onto the wall with the palms of their hands.





photogprah of tate britain

BP Spotlight: Keith Arnatt

  • 11 March 2013 — 11 August 2016 *on now

Keith Arnatt was a British conceptual artist who used photography as a way of documenting perfromative acts that question the status of art and the role of the artist. Using recent acquisitions, this display will show the range of Arnatt’s work and his singular use of photography, focusing on his work of the 1970s and 1980s.

Suitable for



painting of Salisbury Cathedral by John Constable

BP Walk through British Art

  • 1 July 2014 — 31 December 2016 *on now

The BP Walk through British Art offers a circuit of Tate Britain’s unparalleled collection from its beginnings to its end. This ‘walk through time’ has been arranged to ensure that the collection’s full historical range, from 1545 to the present, is always on show. There are no designated themes or movements; instead, you can see a range of art made at any one moment in an open conversational manner.

As part of the BP Walk through British Art there are also two galleries on the main floor which are devoted to Henry Moore, one of Britain’s pre-eminent sculptors. The rooms explore Moore’s close personal relationship with Tate, investigate his working processes and highlight his public sculpture of the 1950s and 1960s.

The BP Walk through British Art also includes The Clore Gallery which is dedicated to the Turner Collection and houses the artist’s bequest to the nation. A room of works by Turner’s great rival and contemporary, John Constable, are also on display. The upper floor of the Clore gallery showcases a changing selection of representative works from Tate’s outstanding collection of paintings, watercolours, drawings and prints by the visionary artist William Blake.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly



BP Spotlight: Tracey Emin and Francis Bacon

  • 21 March 2015 — 1 June 2016 *on now

Tracey Emin’s installation My Bed 1998 returns to Tate Britain after it first came to public attention when shown in the 1999 Turner Prize exhibition.

It is displayed here alongside six of the artist’s recent figure drawings, as well as two oil paintings by Francis Bacon selected by Emin. Her installation, as Bacon’s paintings do, retains a strong sense of the lived presence and memory traces of past events.

By virtue of bringing the domestic into the public sphere, without directly representing specific events, My Bed is forcefully and compellingly suggestive of personal narratives.



Tate Britain Commission 2015: Christina Mackie

  • 24 March — 18 October 2015 *on now

This spring, Christina Mackie unveils a new three-part installation inspired by her interest in pigments and colour. Located in the dramatic Duveen Galleries at the heart of Tate Britain, Mackie fills half of the exhibition space with 12-metre-high dipped silk nets suspended above pans of semi-crystalised dye, to create an ethereal installation. These are shown together with a free-standing sculpture and a plinth displaying chunks of raw glass.

Mackie uses a range of media, but colour and perception remain central to her work. In the Tate Britain Commission 2015, Mackie develops ideas set out in previous projects. The solidity of the building and sculpture contrasts the fluidity of paint, while the nets are kept in a permanent state of flux by the changing light and colour in the Duveen Galleries.



photograph of Barbara Hepworth sculpture

Barbara Hepworth

  • 24 June — 25 October 2015 *on now

Tate Britain will open the first major Barbara Hepworth exhibition in London for almost fifty years. Barbara Hepworth (1903–75) is most commonly associated with St Ives, Cornwall, where she lived from 1939 until her death in 1975.

This major retrospective will emphasise Hepworth’s often overlooked prominence in the international art world, of which she was a leading figure in the 1930s, and one of the most successful artists in the world during the 1950s and 1960s. The exhibition charts Hepworth’s progress from small carvings made as a young woman to the magnificent bronzes that became part of the great sculpture collections of the world. It will present many of her surviving pre-war carvings, and some of her most significant sculptures in wood, stone and bronze. The exhibition will also encompass rarely seen works, including textiles, drawings, collages and photograms.



Frank Auerbach

  • 9 October 2015 — 13 March 2016 *on now

Frank Auerbach (b 1931, Berlin) has made some of the most resonant and inventive paintings in recent times, both of people and of the urban landscapes near his studio in Camden Town.

Encompassing around 70 paintings and drawings, the first six rooms of the exhibition have been sparsely arranged, decade by decade, working closely with the artist. The works in the last two rooms have been selected in consultation with the art historian Catherine Lampert (who has sat for Auerbach since 1978) and they will comprise clusters of work with similar subjects or structures, each piece resolved in a wholly fresh and physical way.



Artist and Empire

  • 25 November 2015 — 10 April 2016

This exhibition will be the first major presentation of the art associated with the British Empire from the sixteenth century to the present day.

Bringing together extraordinary and unexpected artworks from UK collections, both public and private, it will explore how diverse artists around the world responded to the experience of empire.

Comprising sculpture, painting and works on paper, the exhibition will examine the role of art in communicating power relations and cross-cultural translation at different periods of British history. It will consider how the empire shaped some of the themes, ways of making and patterns of collecting which defined British art in the past and which continue to have resonance today.



Resources listed here may include websites, bookable tours and workshops, books, loan boxes and more. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all.

Schools and Teachers


All the resources you need for teaching art in the classroom, from Teachers' Packs to teacher training.

My Imaginary City


Artists use their imaginations to create scenes and places that are not real and that might never exist. If you could invent your own imaginary city what would it be like?

Tate Webquests


Webquests are online activities for children, using the collections of nine national museums and galleries.

The Case of the Mysterious Object


The Silver Cage: Film


Inspired by Cornelia Parker's 'Thirty Pieces of Silver', the Art Sparks create their own work, 'The Silver Cage'. Watch the film to see what they did.

How to obtain

View online on the Tate Kids site.

The Zoom Room


Welcome to the Zoom Room, where you can zoom into fresh ideas for making art. The Zoom Room contains an archive of informal art activities carried out by children in the Tate galleries. Get new ideas for making collages, creating snow globes, putting on performances, or carving soap sculptures. Tips are provided for children, explaining how to carry out these activities in the classroom or at home.

Tate Britain
Greater London







020 7887 8888

Recorded information

020 7887 8008


020 7887 8687

Events and education

020 7887 8888

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.