Bethlem Museum of the Mind

The entrance to Bethlem Museum of the Mind permanent gallery.
Food icon Parking icon Guided tours icon Shop icon Study area icon Wheelchair access icon

Founded in 1247, Bethlem Royal Hospital is now located in Beckenham, South London, as part of the wider South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust. The Archives and Museum service is dedicated to the history of mental health treatment, and includes historical and archival material as well as a large art collection. De-stigmatising mental illness is one of its major roles.

Bethlem Museum of the Mind reopened in the old hospital administration building in February 2015, and now holds regular events. Check the museum website for more details.

You can find us on Twitter @bethlemmuseum, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/bethlemmuseumofthemind.

Venue Type:

Archive, Museum

Opening hours

Wednesday to Friday, and the first and last Saturday of the month

10:00 - 17:00, last admission 16:30

Admission charges

Free

Getting there

Nearest Station: Eden Park / East Croydon
London Transport Travel Zone 5

By car:
From Central London, via Streatham or Crystal Palace to the A214. This passes the north end of Monks Orchard Road.

From further south, via the A232 Croydon to Orpington Road. This passes the south end of Monks Orchard Road just west (the Croydon side) of West Wickham.

By train:
From Cannon Street, Charing Cross, Waterloo East or London Bridge to Eden Park, via trains travelling to Hayes (Kent). Four trains per hour from London Bridge: journey time 30 minutes. Walking time from Eden Park Station, 15 minutes, or take the 356 bus from outside the station to Bethlem Royal Hospital.

From Victoria, frequent fast trains to East Croydon: journey time about 15 minutes. Buses from outside the station, travelling towards West Wickham, Nos. 119, 194 and 198, pass the south end of Monks Orchard Road. Walking time from the bus stop, 5 minutes.

By bus:
Bethlem Royal Hospital is at the Shirley end of the 356 route, which runs to Forest Hill.

The Bethlem site:
Bethlem Hospital occupies a large site and the buildings are widely scattered, but it is easy to find the Archives and Museum, which is close to the entrance. If you are on foot, turn right just inside the gate, and you will find our building a little way down the road on the right hand side. It is well signed. This is a service road, and the traffic barrier is opened only for Heavy Goods Vehicles: so if you are driving you will have to turn left and follow the signs, working your way round until you are nearly back where you started. You may find it easiest to park in the visitor's car park near the gate, or outside in Monks Orchard Road, and walk the short distance to our building.

Additional info

Archives and reference library open to the public by appointment only. Museum opening hours cannot be guaranteed at all times. Please telephone to check before planning a visit.

Collections illustrate aspects of mental health and mental healthcare. They include archives of Bethlem Hospital (the original 'Bedlam') and the Maudsley Hospital (founded in the 20th century, influential in psychiatric teaching and research). Historical objects relate mainly to Bethlem. The unique art collection contains works by artists, past and present, who have suffered from mental health problems. It comes from many sources, not only from the Bethlem and Maudsley Hospitals.

Collection details

Archives, Fine Art, Medicine, Personalities, Social History

Key artists and exhibits

  • Richard Dadd
  • Louis Wain
  • William Kurelek
  • Jonathan Martin
  • Vaslav Nijinsky
  • Cynthia Pell
  • Caius Gabriel Cibber's statues of 'Raving and Melancholy Madness' from 17th century Bedlam
Exhibition details are listed below, you may need to scroll down to see them all.
A colourful portrait. The subject sits center gazing forward, with yellow hair and blue skin. Her red top is visible at the bottom centre of the painting. She is surrounded by abstract patterns in block colours.

Scaling the Citadel: The Art of Stanley Lench

  • 15 February — 30 September 2017 *on now

The art of Stanley Lench (1934-2000) is a window into his life and experiences. Lench studied at the Royal College of Art as a contemporary of Malcolm Morley and Peter Blake and sold work to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, yet remains relatively unknown. This exhibition will explore Lench’s influences and inspiration, and the impact his mental ill health had on his artistic career.

Free entry - all welcome

Suitable for

  • Any age

Website

http://museumofthemind.org.uk/whats-on/exhibition-info/scaling-the-citadel-the-art-of-stanley-lench

Events details are listed below. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all. For events that don't have a specific date see the 'Resources' tab above.
Matthew Green is featured smiling in the middle of the the image.

Aftershock: The Untold Story of Surviving Peace

  • 7 October 2017 2-3:30pm

When conflict ends on the battlefield, it begins elsewhere. Matthew Green explores how veterans have struggled to adapt to post-war life, examining some of the ways in which we can better support those suffering from psychological injury who undertake the journey from soldier to civilian.

Matthew Green is a London-based journalist who previously spent 14 years working as a foreign correspondent for the Financial Times and Reuters. He was embedded with US Marines during the Iraq invasion and later spent time with US forces deployed in Afghanistan. In 2013, he returned to Britain to write his new book Aftershock: fighting war, surviving trauma and finding peace, which documents the lives of British veterans and their families as they cope with the devastating impact of post-traumatic stress disorder. He blogs about new horizons in trauma therapy at www.matthewgreenjournalism.com. Twitter @Matthew__Green

There will be a book signing following the event. Please bring cash or cheque if you wish to purchase a book.

Suitable for

  • 18+

Website

http://museumofthemind.org.uk/whats-on/event-info/aftershock-the-untold-story-of-surviving-peace

Sir Simon Wessely is portrayed in the centre of the image.

Whatever happened to Shellshock?

  • 26 October 2017 7-8:30pm

Shell shock is the phrase coined in World War I to describe what is now commonly referred to as post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).Professor Simon Wessely charts the evolution of military psychiatry, reviewing psychological disorders suffered by servicemen and women from 1900 to the present, considering the history of treatment in relation to contemporary medical priorities and health concerns.

Professor Sir Simon Wessely is Professor of Psychological Medicine and Regius Professor of Psychiatry at King’s College London and a Consultant Liaison Psychiatrist at King’s College and the Maudsley Hospitals.His doctorate is in epidemiology, and he has over 700 original publications, with an emphasis on the boundaries of medicine and psychiatry, unexplained symptoms and syndromes, population reactions to adversity, military health, epidemiology and others. He has co-authored books on chronic fatigue syndrome, randomised controlled trials and a history of military psychiatry. Professor Wessely is also President of the Royal Society of Medicine.

Suitable for

  • 18+

Website

http://museumofthemind.org.uk/whats-on/event-info/museums-at-night-whatever-happened-to-shell-shock

A black and white image of Emily Mayhew, standing to the left of the photo.

A Heavy Reckoning: War, Medicine and Survival in Afghanistan and Beyond

  • 28 October 2017 2-3:30pm

A Heavy Reckoning explores the modern reality of medicine and injury in wartime, from the trenches of World War One to the dusty plains of Afghanistan and the rehabilitation wards of Headley Court in Surrey. What are the costs involved in this hardest of journeys back from the brink? Mixing stories of unexpected survival with insights into the frontline of medicine, Emily Mayhew examines the complexities of PTSD, the power and potential of rehabilitation, and how far we have come in saving, healing and restoring the human body.

Dr Emily Mayhew is a military medical historian specialising in the study of severe casualty, its infliction, treatment and long-term outcomes in 20th and 21st century warfare. She is historian in residence in the Department of Bioengineering at Imperial College, and a Research Fellow in the Division of Surgery within the Department of Surgery and Cancer. She is the author of Wounded: From Battlefield to Blighty 1914-1918, which was shortlisted for the Wellcome Prize 2014.

There will be a book signing after the event.

Suitable for

  • 18+

Website

http://museumofthemind.org.uk/whats-on/event-info/a-heavy-reckoning-war-medicine-and-survival-in-afghanistan-and-beyond

Mark Neville stands in the centre of the image, holding his camera.

The Battle Against Stigma

  • 4 November 2017 2-3:30pm

A British soldier on tour in Afghanistan faces a one-in-four chance of being killed or wounded. In response, almost every combatant will experience psychological problems. The stigma attached to sufferers of war trauma exacerbates the difficulty of readjustment on the return home, sometimes making integration into civilian life impossible. War-photographer Mark Neville who, after being embedded with troops in Helmand, suffered PTSD himself, tells his own story through images, as well as those of the soldiers whose experiences he documented.

In 2011, war photographer Mark Neville, spent three months working on the front line in Helmand, Afghanistan, with 16 Air Assault Brigade as an official war artist. The films and photographs he made there featured in a major solo show at The Imperial War Museum London in the Summer of 2014. More recently his war experience has resulted in The Battle Against Stigma Book Project, a collaboration between the artist and Professor Jamie Hacker Hughes, one of the UK’s leading experts in the field of veteran mental health. http://www.markneville.com/

Suitable for

  • 18+

Website

http://museumofthemind.org.uk/whats-on/event-info/the-battle-against-stigma

Getting there

Nearest Station: Eden Park / East Croydon
London Transport Travel Zone 5

By car:
From Central London, via Streatham or Crystal Palace to the A214. This passes the north end of Monks Orchard Road.

From further south, via the A232 Croydon to Orpington Road. This passes the south end of Monks Orchard Road just west (the Croydon side) of West Wickham.

By train:
From Cannon Street, Charing Cross, Waterloo East or London Bridge to Eden Park, via trains travelling to Hayes (Kent). Four trains per hour from London Bridge: journey time 30 minutes. Walking time from Eden Park Station, 15 minutes, or take the 356 bus from outside the station to Bethlem Royal Hospital.

From Victoria, frequent fast trains to East Croydon: journey time about 15 minutes. Buses from outside the station, travelling towards West Wickham, Nos. 119, 194 and 198, pass the south end of Monks Orchard Road. Walking time from the bus stop, 5 minutes.

By bus:
Bethlem Royal Hospital is at the Shirley end of the 356 route, which runs to Forest Hill.

The Bethlem site:
Bethlem Hospital occupies a large site and the buildings are widely scattered, but it is easy to find the Archives and Museum, which is close to the entrance. If you are on foot, turn right just inside the gate, and you will find our building a little way down the road on the right hand side. It is well signed. This is a service road, and the traffic barrier is opened only for Heavy Goods Vehicles: so if you are driving you will have to turn left and follow the signs, working your way round until you are nearly back where you started. You may find it easiest to park in the visitor's car park near the gate, or outside in Monks Orchard Road, and walk the short distance to our building.

Bethlem Museum of the Mind
Bethlem Royal Hospital
Monks Orchard Road
Beckenham
Kent
BR3 3BX
England

Website

www.museumofthemind.org.uk

E-mail

Archives

colin.gale@motm.org.uk

Telephone

General

020 3228 4227

Fax

General

020 3228 4045

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
advertisement