Ben Uri Gallery and Museum, London: Art, Identity, Migration

Front window of the Ben Uri Gallery Museum, refecting the buildings opposite
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Ben Uri is an Art Museum and educational charity, founded in July 1915 in Whitechapel, East London.
Known as ‘The Art Museum for Everyone’ the museum collection and programming both focus on the universal themes of Art, Identity and Migration.
The Ben Uri Collection is internationally recognised and encompasses over 1300 works, principally from the start of the 20thcentury including Auerbach, Bomberg, Chagall, Epstein, Gertler, Grosz, Kossoff, Liebermann, Pissarro, Solomon, Soutine, Ury & Wolmark.
Ben Uri present 4 major exhibitions a year - see web for details.

Venue Type:

Museum, Gallery

Opening hours

Monday - Friday: 10am - 5.30pm,
Saturday - Sunday: 11 - 5pm

Admission charges

Admission free

Discounts

  • National Art Pass
Getting there

How to travel to Ben Uri

By rail: Underground stations St Johns Wood, Swiss Cottage, and Maida Vale are about 15 minutes walk away; West Hampstead and Kilburn High Road London Overground stations are also within walking distance.

By bus: Buses 189 and 139 stop at the junction of Abbey Road and Boundary Road. Bus 31 Stops at the junction of Belsize Road and Abbey Road, a short walk from Boundary Road. Go to Transport for London to plan your journey by rail or bus.

Driving: There is metered car parking on Boundary Road and there is also a disabled parking bay in Boundary Road.

Additional info

Access: The gallery welcomes disabled people and endeavours to care for all needs. We regret that access to galleries and lavatories is extremely difficult with a steep staircase. We are able to assist visitors who use wheelchairs if notified in advance.

Ben Uri Gallery and Museum, London: Art, Identity, Migration Collection is internationally recognised and encompasses over 1300 works, principally from the start of the 20th century, by some 385 artists originating from 35 different countries including Chagall, Liebermann, Pissarro, Soutine, Ury alongside Auerbach, Bomberg, Epstein, Gertler, Kitaj, Kossoff, Solomon and Wolmark. A permanent collection of over 200 British and European artists, 67% of the artists are émigré, 33% are contemporary and 27% women.
The society aims to develop its wide range of cultural activities and to establish a permanent home for the collection. Access to the collection is provided through exhibitions including touring, collection loans, publications, academic and public presentations, nationwide learning programmes, social health and extensively through the internet. A number of sponsorship opportunities are available.

Collection details

Fine Art

Key artists and exhibits

  • Key artists in the permenant collection include Frank Auerbach, Mark Gertler, David Bomberg, Jacob Epstein, Jacob Kramer, Leon Kossof, R B Kitaj, Martin Bloch, Arthir Segal and Alfred Wolmark.
Exhibition details are listed below, you may need to scroll down to see them all.
David Bomberg's Ghetto Theatre

Bomberg

  • 22 June — 16 September 2018

Works from major institutions including Arts Council England, Tate, The Fitzwilliam
Museum, Pallant House Gallery and The Sainsbury Centre for the Visual Arts will be on
show alongside works from important private collections and from Ben Uri’s extensive
collection of Bomberg’s works.

A new monograph, the first for 30 years, by Ben Uri and Bomberg curators Rachel Dickson and Sarah MacDougall is now available in hard and soft back.

More than 40 works representing each significant periods of Bomberg’s oeuvre make up the exhibition.

Key themes of the largely chronological exhibition include:
● Bomberg’s Jewish background and engagement with Yiddish culture
● His contribution to pre-war British modernism
● His role as a war artist in both world wars
● His work as a graphic artist and his exposure in contemporaneous “little magazines”
● His Jerusalem Landscapes
● His self-portraiture and portraiture of friends and family
● His mature achievements as a landscape painter in Spain, Cyprus and Britain.

David Bomberg (1890-1957) was born in Birmingham to Polish-Jewish immigrant parents. He spent his formative years in London’s East End among his fellow “Whitechapel Boys” which remains a principal focus of Ben Uri. The influence of his early evening-class tutor Walter Sickert is reflected in Bomberg’s Bedroom Picture (1911-12, private collection) which was later re-worked as the Vorticist-
influenced At the Window (1919, Ben Uri Collection). Both works are included in the
exhibition and are an example of a pairing or re-working that is one of its major themes.

David Bomberg and Ben Uri histories have been intertwined since the museum was the first public institution to recognise the importance of his radical oeuvre and purchased his
works initially in 1920 and regularly thereafter.

Suitable for

  • Any age

Admission

£5/£4 concessions

Getting there

How to travel to Ben Uri

By rail: Underground stations St Johns Wood, Swiss Cottage, and Maida Vale are about 15 minutes walk away; West Hampstead and Kilburn High Road London Overground stations are also within walking distance.

By bus: Buses 189 and 139 stop at the junction of Abbey Road and Boundary Road. Bus 31 Stops at the junction of Belsize Road and Abbey Road, a short walk from Boundary Road. Go to Transport for London to plan your journey by rail or bus.

Driving: There is metered car parking on Boundary Road and there is also a disabled parking bay in Boundary Road.

Ben Uri Gallery and Museum, London: Art, Identity, Migration
108a Boundary Road
London
Greater London
NW8 0RH
England

Website

benuri.org.uk/

E-mail

Ben Uri Gallery and Museum

info@benuri.org.uk

Telephone

020 7604 3991

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
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