Science Museum to reveal "extraordinary" Large Hadron Collider laboratory

By Culture24 Reporter | 24 April 2013

The Science Museum has revealed more details about its recreation of part of the inside of CERN, the European Organisation for Nuclear Research in Switzerland which was behind the famed Large Hadron Collider experiment.

A computer image of people inside a colourful scientific exhibition
Artist impression of the immersive collision experience, which is coming to The Science Museum in November 2013© Science Museum / Nissen Richards Studio
One of the most hotly-anticipated science exhibitions of the year, the museum’s immersive concept aims to let visitors faithfully experience a lab revered across the world.

It will include a Control Room, an enormous detector cavern, “virtual” scientists who will discuss their findings, workbenches and a journey alongside particle beams steered around a 27-kilometre tunnel via an accelerator device which ramps up their speed.

Curators have worked closely with their Swiss collaborators on the items lying in wait.

“I’ve been lucky enough to visit CERN and see inside the Collider,” says Alison Boyle, the museum’s Curator of Modern Physics.

“It’s an unforgettable experience.

“Particle physics is a challenging topic for an exhibition, but it’s also a compelling one.

“We want to give our visitors a tangible sense of the extraordinary ambitions of the Collider and the excitement of working on the project.”

A section of one of the 15-metre magnets responsible for steering the particle beams, as well as pieces from the Collder’s four huge detectors, are among the installations likely to catch the eye, accompanied by elements of theatre, video performance and sound art.

Although it testifies to the most brilliant contemporary innovation, historical contextualisation will also be provided through objects such as the apparatus of JJ Thomson – used to discover the electron in 1897 – and the electron used to split the atom by Cockfroft and Walton 81 years ago.

The Embassy of Switzerland and the Science and Technology Facilities Council are two of the funders of the £1 million project.

Rolf Heuer, of CERN, said he was “very much looking forward” to the results, praising the award-winning creative team commissioned to design the display.

"I particularly like the fresh, theatrical approach the Museum is taking to bringing the drama and excitement of cutting-edge science to the public,” he added.

  • Opens November 13 2013. Tickets £10 (concessions available). Telephone 0870 870 4868 to book.

More pictures:

A computer image of people inside a colourful scientific exhibition
The Large Hadron Collider tunnel section of the exhibition© Science Museum / Nissen Richards Studio
A computer image of people inside a colourful scientific exhibition
The immersive detector experience© Science Museum / Nissen Richards Studio
A computer image of people inside a colourful scientific exhibition
The accelerator chain section© Science Museum / Nissen Richards Studio
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