Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art - National Galleries of Scotland

Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art - National Galleries of Scotland
Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art
Belford Road
Edinburgh
Lothian
EH4 3DR
Scotland

Website

www.nationalgalleries.org/visit/118-introduction/

E-mail

gmainfo@nationalgalleries.org

Telephone

0131 624 6200

Fax

0131 343 3250

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
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Home to Scotland’s outstanding national collection of modern and contemporary art, the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art includes two gallery buildings, Modern One and Modern Two.

Works from the Gallery’s collection, plus special loans, are presented in Modern One. The early part of the collection features French and Russian art from the beginning of the twentieth century, cubist paintings and superb holdings of expressionist and modern British art. Special highlights include paintings by Matisse and Picasso.

The Gallery also has an outstanding collection of international post-war work and the most important and extensive collection of modern Scottish art. The post-war collection features art by Francis Bacon, David Hockney, Andy Warhol and Lucian Freud, with more recent works by artists including Antony Gormley, Gilbert & George, Damien Hirst and Tracey Emin.

Modern Two is home to a changing programme of exhibitions and displays drawn for the permanent collection. On permanent display is a fascinating recreation of Eduard Paolozzi’s studio, as well as his 7.3m tall sculpture, Vulcan, that dominates the café. Modern Two is also home to the Gallery’s substantial library and archive, open to the public by appointment, and changing displays in the Gabrielle Keiller library.

Also in Modern Two is The Stairwell Project, a large-scale, permanent work by 2009 Turner Prize winner Richard Wright. Comprising several thousand individually hand-painted forms, the piece sits as Wright's most complex and ambitious work to date in Britain.

Set in extensive parkland, visitors can discover sculpture works by important artists like Ian Hamilton Finlay, Henry Moore, Rachel Whiteread, Richard Long and Nathan Coley. The lawn to the front of Modern One was re-landscaped in 2002 to a design by Charles Jencks.

Venue Type:

Gallery

Opening hours

Open daily, 10am-5pm

Admission charges

Free

When the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art opened in 1960, it inherited a small number of 20th century works from the National Gallery of Scotland, but the majority of the collection has been acquired over the last forty years.

The collection now comprises more than 5,000 items, ranging in date from the late 19th century to the present and encompasses work in a wide variety of media, from paintings, bronzes and works on paper, to kinetic sculpture and video installations.

Highlights of the collection include early 20th century French paintings by Bonnard, Vuillard, Derain and Matisse; Cubist work by Braque, Léger and Picasso; early 20th century Russian art, including oils by Larionov and Goncharova; and a superb collection of Expressionist art, with works by Barlach, Kirchner, Kokoschka and Nolde. The post-war collection includes work by Morandi, Bacon, Hockney, Lichtenstein, Warhol, Moore and Freud.

20th century Scottish art is especially well represented, with works by Mackintosh, the Scottish Colourists, Gillies, Maxwell, Eardley, Philipson, Davie, Bellany, Currie and Howson, while recent acquisitions include works by younger Scots such as Christine Borland and Douglas Gordon.

The Gallery's outstanding collection of Dada and Surrealist art and extensive holding of work by Sir Eduardo Paolozzi is shown in the adjacent Dean Gallery (renamed Modern Two in 2011).

Since space permits only a portion of the collection to be displayed at any one time, works are shown on a rotating basis. Exhibitions are also held throughout the year. The Gallery's collection of works on paper is held in the Print Room, which is open by appointment.

Collection details

Decorative and Applied Art, Fine Art

Exhibition details are listed below, you may need to scroll down to see them all.

GENERATION: 25 Years of Contemporary Art in Scotland

  • 28 June 2014 — 25 January 2015 *on now

The Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art will mount a ground-breaking, two-part exhibition at Modern One and the Scottish National Gallery, offering a rich, diverse and coherent view of the way that contemporary art has developed in Scotland over the past 25 years. More than 30 artists will be represented across the two sites, and works made at key moments in the last quarter-century will be shown in parallel with new work by both established and promising younger artists.

At the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, the exhibition will include spectacular installations by Ross Sinclair (Real Life Rocky Mountain, 1996), Graham Fagen (Peek-A-Jobby, 1998) and Turner Prize-winner Simon Starling (Burn-Time, 2000). A diverse range of work by artists such as Victoria Morton, Alison Watt, Julie Roberts, Lucy McKenzie, Kate Davis, Charles Avery and Jonathan Owen will demonstrate the continuing vitality of painting and drawing in Scotland and there will be new installations in sculpture, painting, collage and printmaking by Claire Barclay, Ciara Philips and Alex Dordoy. Douglas Gordon’s celebrated 24 Hour Psycho 1993 will be among the video installations on show, as will Smith/Stewart’s Breathing Space (1997), Roddy Buchanan’s Gobstopper (1999) and Soda Stream (1997) and Torsten Lauschmann’s Growing Zeros (Digital Clock) (2010).

Suitable for

  • Any age

Website

http://www.nationalgalleries.org/whatson/exhibitions/generation-25-years-of-contemporary-art-in-scotland-modern/

The Two Roberts: Robert MacBryde and Robert Colquhoun

  • 22 November 2014 — 14 May 2015

This major exhibition will explore the work the Scottish artists Robert MacBryde and Robert Colquhoun or ‘The Two Roberts’, as they were known. Friends of Francis Bacon and Lucian Freud, they took the London art-world by storm in the 1940s, with sell-out exhibitions of their paintings, but by the 1960s their position as two of the country’s most celebrated artists had been eclipsed, and this will be the first major retrospective devoted to their work.

Robert MacBryde was born in Maybole in Ayrshire in 1913, Colquhoun in Kilmarnock in 1914. From poor, working-class backgrounds, they met at Glasgow School of Art in 1933, and soon became lovers. In 1941 they moved to London where they became part of the celebrated Soho set that included artists such as Bacon, Keith Vaughan and John Craxton, and the poets Dylan Thomas and George Barker. Colquhoun specialised in figure painting, MacBryde in still-life. Hard drinking, volatile and uncompromising, their lives were as passionate and compelling as their art.

The Lefevre Gallery on Bond Street held a string of successful shows of their work; the Museum of Modern Art in New York and the Tate acquired paintings. By the mid-1950s they were among the most famous artists working in Britain. But as abstraction became the dominant force in European art in the late 1950s, and as their drinking increased, so their popularity suffered. Colquhoun died penniless in 1962, aged just 47; MacBryde was knocked over by a car and died in 1966. Few artists have catapulted to celebrity or descended into obscurity so swiftly: their remarkable careers lasted scarcely twenty years.

Suitable for

  • Any age

Admission

£8.00/ £6.00.

Website

http://www.nationalgalleries.org/whatson/exhibitions/the-two-roberts-robert-macbryde-and-robert-colquhoun/

Events details are listed below. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all. For events that don't have a specific date see the 'Resources' tab above.

Bags of Art

  • 16 November 2014 2-4pm

Cool and creative fun with artists Tessa Asquith-Lamb and Louise Fraser. Supported by the Friends of the National Galleries of Scotland.

No booking required: free, unticketed

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