Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art

Exterior of Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art (Modern One Building)
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Home to Scotland’s outstanding national collection of modern and contemporary art, the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art includes two gallery buildings, Modern One and Modern Two.

Works from the Gallery’s collection, plus special loans, are presented in Modern One. The early part of the collection features French and Russian art from the beginning of the twentieth century, cubist paintings and superb holdings of expressionist and modern British art. Special highlights include paintings by Matisse and Picasso.

The Gallery also has an outstanding collection of international post-war work and the most important and extensive collection of modern Scottish art. The post-war collection features art by Francis Bacon, David Hockney, Andy Warhol and Lucian Freud, with more recent works by artists including Antony Gormley, Gilbert & George, Damien Hirst and Tracey Emin.

Modern Two is home to a changing programme of exhibitions and displays drawn for the permanent collection. On permanent display is a fascinating recreation of Eduard Paolozzi’s studio, as well as his 7.3m tall sculpture, Vulcan, that dominates the café. Modern Two is also home to the Gallery’s substantial library and archive, open to the public by appointment, and changing displays in the Gabrielle Keiller library.

Also in Modern Two is The Stairwell Project, a large-scale, permanent work by 2009 Turner Prize winner Richard Wright. Comprising several thousand individually hand-painted forms, the piece sits as Wright's most complex and ambitious work to date in Britain.

Set in extensive parkland, visitors can discover sculpture works by important artists like Ian Hamilton Finlay, Henry Moore, Rachel Whiteread, Richard Long and Nathan Coley. The lawn to the front of Modern One was re-landscaped in 2002 to a design by Charles Jencks.

Venue Type:

Gallery

Opening hours

Open daily, 10am-5pm.

Admission charges

Free, charges may apply for temporary exhibitions

Discounts

  • National Art Pass
  • International Council of Museums
  • Museums Association

When the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art opened in 1960, it inherited a small number of 20th century works from the National Gallery of Scotland, but the majority of the collection has been acquired over the last forty years.

The collection now comprises more than 5,000 items, ranging in date from the late 19th century to the present and encompasses work in a wide variety of media, from paintings, bronzes and works on paper, to kinetic sculpture and video installations.

Highlights of the collection include early 20th century French paintings by Bonnard, Vuillard, Derain and Matisse; Cubist work by Braque, Léger and Picasso; early 20th century Russian art, including oils by Larionov and Goncharova; and a superb collection of Expressionist art, with works by Barlach, Kirchner, Kokoschka and Nolde. The post-war collection includes work by Morandi, Bacon, Hockney, Lichtenstein, Warhol, Moore and Freud.

20th century Scottish art is especially well represented, with works by Mackintosh, the Scottish Colourists, Gillies, Maxwell, Eardley, Philipson, Davie, Bellany, Currie and Howson, while recent acquisitions include works by younger Scots such as Christine Borland and Douglas Gordon.

The Gallery's outstanding collection of Dada and Surrealist art and extensive holding of work by Sir Eduardo Paolozzi is shown in the adjacent Dean Gallery (renamed Modern Two in 2011).

Since space permits only a portion of the collection to be displayed at any one time, works are shown on a rotating basis. Exhibitions are also held throughout the year. The Gallery's collection of works on paper is held in the Print Room, which is open by appointment.

Collection details

Decorative and Applied Art, Fine Art

Exhibition details are listed below, you may need to scroll down to see them all.
Emil Nolde, Bay

Emil Nolde | Colour is Life

  • 14 July — 21 October 2018 *on now

Emil Nolde (1867-1956) was one of the greatest colourists of the twentieth century. He felt strongly about what he painted, identifying with his subjects in every brushstroke he made, heightening his colours and simplifying his shapes, so that we, the viewers, can also experience his emotional response to the world about him. This is what makes Nolde one of Germany’s greatest expressionist artists.
Please note this exhibition contains some material that visitors may find upsetting.
Emil Nolde was a German Expressionist painter and is acknowledged as one of the most influential German artists of the twentieth century. He was also a supporter of the Nazi party. We have included the painting ‘Martyrdom 1921’ in room 3 in order to show how Nolde expressed ideas that drew on long-standing anti-Semitic prejudices that would ultimately lead to the horrors of the Holocaust, which are still sadly evident today. We stress that we do not condone or excuse the artist’s political beliefs and anti-Semitic views in any way.

The National Galleries of Scotland are committed to promoting the values of equality and respect and to addressing the challenging issues that the history of twentieth-century art opens up for contemporary audiences.

Suitable for

  • Any age

Admission

£10 (£8)

Website

https://www.nationalgalleries.org/exhibition/emil-nolde-colour-life

Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art
75 Belford Road
Edinburgh
Lothian
EH4 3DR
Scotland

Website

https://www.nationalgalleries.org/visit/scottish-national-gallery-modern-art

E-mail

gmainfo@nationalgalleries.org

Telephone

0131 624 6200

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
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