Adorn, Equip: A Vision Of Disability Paraphernalia

By Marie Sansom | 13 September 2002
'Body, Nobody, Somebody, Anybody', by Freddie Robins with Mat Fraser and Catherine Long. Modelled by Mat Fraser. © City Gallery, Leicester and the artists.

Left: 'Body, Nobody, Somebody, Anybody', by Freddie Robins with Mat Fraser and Catherine Long. Modelled by Mat Fraser. © City Gallery, Leicester and the artists.

It's your last chance to see touring exhibition Adorn, Equip at the London Institute Gallery in Mayfair, an exciting and irreverent exhibition challenging the view that the equipment and accessories used by disabled people have to be uncool.

Nearing the end of its yearlong tour, which kicked off at City Gallery in Leicester, the show explores how such equipment has traditionally been designed with concerns of functionality and economy in mind - Adorn, Equip turns this notion on its head.

Pink Spiky Chair, by Ticky Lowe with Henshaw Arts and Crafts Centre, Knaresborough, mixed media. © City Gallery, Leicester and the artists.

Right: Pink Spiky Chair, by Ticky Lowe with Henshaw Arts and Crafts Centre, Knaresborough, mixed media. © City Gallery, Leicester and the artists.

"Adorn, Equip is a revolution against the beige melamine which characterises much of disability design" says Ju Gosling, former artist in residence at one of the tour venues, Oriel 31.

"A riot of colour, energy and infinite variety which mirrors the lives of the disabled people I know, and which contrasts sharply with the medicalised, commercial products that most disabled people are forced to accept in their lives."

Chariot of the Sun, by Andrew Logan, detail. © City Gallery, Leicester and the artists.

Left: Chariot of the Sun, by Andrew Logan, detail. © City Gallery, Leicester and the artists.

There are delights here like Andrew Logan's 'Chariot's of Fire' - Zimmer frames draped in fabric and clustered with rhinestone suns, Susie Freeman's handbag for agoraphobics, studded with medication or neck and back braces that Patsy and Edina would be proud of.

A culmination of three years spent getting together disabled people, designers, artists and artisans in different parts of the country, the exhibition grew out of an open conference held at De Montfort Hall in Leicester in 1998.

Go Go Gadget Wheelchair, by Felicity Shillingford and Paul Mcgarry with Garry Robson. © City Gallery, Leicester and the artists.

Right: Go Go Gadget Wheelchair, by Felicity Shillingford and Paul Mcgarry with Garry Robson. © City Gallery, Leicester and the artists.

Part of a larger project by City Gallery, Adorn, Equip begins a long-term commitment to broadening access and participation in the arts.

The project has three parts: a touring exhibition, an audience development programme and a Year of the Artist Residency.

If you can't get to the gallery to see the show, you can check out the sparkly, gorgeous and the fantastical by clicking on this link.

More on the venues and organisations we've mentioned:
Related listings (21)
See all related listings »

Events

  • 1 mile
  • 2 miles
  • 3 miles
  • 4 miles
  • 5 miles
  • 10 miles
  • 20 miles
  • 50 miles
  • Any time
  • Today
  • This week
  • This month
  • This year

advertisement