Abbot Hall Art Gallery

inside Abot Hall Art Gallery
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The award-winning Abbot Hall Art Gallery is a Grade 1 listed building with a national reputation for showing world-class contemporary and historic works.

Conveniently located in the town centre, Abbot Hall enjoys a pretty riverside setting. Just a stone's throw from the leafy Abbot Hall Park and Kendal Parish Church, it makes for a fascinating and inspiring day out for all ages.

Venue Type:

Gallery, Historic house or home

Opening hours

Monday - Saturday 10.30am - 5pm (closing 4pm Nov - Feb)

Admission charges

Adult £7.70 (without donation £7.00)
Children and Students FREE

Collection details

Archives, Decorative and Applied Art, Fine Art, Music, Personalities, Social History

Exhibition details are listed below, you may need to scroll down to see them all.

The Great Picture Triptych, 1646

  • 1 November 2014 — 1 November 2018 *on now

This monumental painting which is nearly 5 meters wide, presents the family history and accomplishments of Lady Anne Clifford using a combination of portraiture, text and symbolism.

The left panel of the triptych depicts Lady Anne Clifford at the age of fifteen, when she was disinherited. The inclusion of portraits and books highlight Lady Anne’s education and refined upbringing.

The central panel depicts Lady Anne’s parents, Margaret Russell and George Clifford, third Earl of Cumberland, with her older brothers who did not survive to adulthood. On the walls behind the family group hang portraits of Lady Anne’s four aunts. As Lady Anne was not born until 1590, she does not appear in the central panel as such, but Lady Margaret’s gesture hints that the daughter who would ultimately become the Clifford heir had already been conceived at the time of the original painting.

The right panel shows Lady Anne in late middle age, when she finally regained the Clifford estates. Portraits of Lady Anne’s two husbands hang behind her. The depiction of Lady Anne at fifty-six was used as the model for many subsequent portraits and is probably the only likeness in The Great Picture to have been painted from life.

The triptych is a composite work by a skilled copyist working from miniatures, portraits and whatever gowns and armour were still in Lady Anne’s possession. The piece has been attributed to Jan van Belcamp (1610-1653), a Dutch artist active in England who was a specialist in this genre.

Suitable for

  • Any age

Website

http://www.abbothall.org.uk/exhibitions/great-picture-triptych-1646

George Romney

  • 1 November 2014 — 1 November 2018 *on now

On display in the Georgian interiors downstairs at Abbot Hall is a selection of works by George Romney (1734-1802), one of the greatest of all eighteenth-century portrait painters. Starting in the Dining Room, Romney’s early career in Kendal is described through paintings that show him developing his style and growing in confidence as an independent artist: from the beautiful colouration and awkward elegance of his early full length portraits, through to the experimental light effects of The Artist’s Brother James Holding a Candle (1761) and his grand Shakespearean ‘history’ painting, King Lear in the tempest tearing off his Robes (1762).

Suitable for

  • Any age

Website

http://www.abbothall.org.uk/exhibitions/george-romney

Elisabeth Frink: Fragility and Power

Elisabeth Frink: Fragility and Power

  • 22 June — 29 September 2018

Abbot Hall Art Gallery's main summer show will explore and celebrate the work of one of the most exciting and individual British sculptors of the twentieth century.

Never compromising on the development of her own style, Frink ignored the commercial fashions throughout her career, creating works that combine the fragile nature of humanity with its power.

The exhibition will be the first large scale show of work by Frink in the North West for several years and the first time Abbot Hall has dedicated a major exhibition to Frink in Abbot Hall's 55-year history.

Showing a selection of Frink's work, made throughout her career, the exhibition will explore her influences, methods and stories, all told using her own words. There will be over 50 works on display including sculpture, maquettes and works on paper, and a number of works on loan from private collectors that have never been seen in public.

The majority of the work will be in the upstairs galleries however Abbot Hall will also site a selection of larger sculpture, including Walking, Madonna, 1981 and Riace lll, 1986, in the Georgian entrance hall and ground floor galleries amongst period interiors and historic works.

Kerri Offord, Head of Curatorial, Lakeland Arts said: "Frink was uncompromising in her creative output, creating exciting and emotive works that were both autobiographical and politically charged. Her individual style and unique subjects bucked the main trends of the twentieth century, yet her work was always in style."

Fragility and Power coincides with increased attention on the sculptor who was born in Suffolk in 1930 and died in Dorset on 18 April 1993.

Presented in collaboration with The Ingram Collection.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

Admission

Adults £7.70 / £7.00 without gift aid. Children and students free.

Website

http://www.abbothall.org.uk/elisabethfrink

Abbot Hall Art Gallery
Abbot Hall
Kendal
Cumbria
LA9 5AL
England

Website

Our website for what's on, the cafe, information for your visit and more.

www.abbothall.org.uk

www.lakelandartstrust.org.uk

E-mail

info@abbothall.org.uk

Telephone

01539 722464

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
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