Otterton Mill Centre and Working Museum

Otterton Mill Centre and Working Museum
Nr Budleigh
Salterton
Devon
EX9 7HG
England

Website

Telephone

01395 568521

Fax

01395 568521

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.

here has been a working mill at Otterton since at least Norman times, when King William the Conqueror granted all the local land hereabouts to the abbots of St Michel of Normandy. The earliest written record of the mill is in the Domesday survey in 1068, which confirmed its status as one of the largest and most productive of the seventy mills in Devon. At this time, there was sufficient water power for the mill to be using three sets of mill-stones. Otterton Manor estate (and its mill) remained under French rule for 400 years until Henry V took it back and gave it to the nuns of Syon Abbey. Later, when Henry VIII ordered the dissolution of the monasteries, the manor was sold to Richard Duke and remained with his family for 200 years. In 1785, the estate was sold to Denys Rolle, whose family was subsequently joined in marriage with the Clinton family. To this day, the mill and much of the surrounding land remains part of the Clinton Devon Estate.

The mill was lovingly restored in 1977 by Desna Greenhow, with the support of Judge George Polson. Once again, the mill began producing the wholemeal flour for which Otterton is so famous. Desna ran the mill for 25 years, not only becoming a miller herself, but also creating within the mill buildings a centre for arts and crafts, natural and locally sourced foods, education and entertainment. Her legacy flourished under Bob Butler and Claire Stein, and continues with current owners Caroline and Simon Spiller who took over the business in April 2008. Otterton Mill is now by far the most productive watermill in Devon, and the centre of a thriving complex of working buildings, all of which are open to visitors free of charge throughout the year.

Venue Type:

Museum

Opening hours

Vary according to the season. Please see website for more details.

Admission charges

Free

advertisement