Ikon Gallery

Ikon Gallery
1 Oozells Square
Brindleyplace
Birmingham
B1 2HS
England

Website

www.ikon-gallery.co.uk

Telephone

Information

0121 248 0708

Ikon Shop

0121 248 0711

Café Ikon

0121 248 3226

Gallery hire

0121 248 0708

Fax

0121 248 0709

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
Ikon Gallery exterior
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Ikon Gallery is an internationally acclaimed contemporary art venue situated in the refurbished neo-gothic Oozells Street School building in Brindleyplace, central Birmingham. Ikon shows a varied programme of exhibitions which change every two months, along with a series of talks, tours, workshops and seminars.

Venue Type:

Gallery

Opening hours

Tuesday - Sunday 11am - 6pm

Closed Mondays except Bank Holidays, and during installation of exhibitions. Please call to confirm opening times

Admission charges

Free entry

Additional info

Ikon Resource Room: Situated on the 2nd floor, the Resource Room is a public space offering interpretative material for main gallery exhibitions.

Ikon Shop: Ikon has an on-site specialist art bookshop plus an online shop at www.ikon-gallery.co.uk Opening times are Tuesday - Sunday 10.30am-6pm. Open during installation of exhibitions.
T: 0121 248 0711.

Café Ikon: an informal, modern Tapas bar. Opening times are Tuesday - Saturday 11am-11pm, Sunday 11am-6pm. Open during installation of exhibitions.T: 0121 248 3226.

Ikon Gallery Hire: If you are interested in hiring the Galleries or Events/Meeting Room for a private function or meeting please telephone Ikon Marketing on 0121 248 0708 for a copy of our brochure and current rates.

Access: Ikon Gallery aims to be fully accessible to disabled visitors. A wheelchair and audio guide are available on request. Guide dogs are welcome throughout the building. If you require assistance, please telephone 0121 248 0708 or ask at the reception desk.

Ikon shows a continuous programme of changing exhibitions both in the galleries and offsite. A variety of media are represented including sound, video, mixed media, photography, painting, sculpture and installation. As well as exhibitions in the gallery, exhibitions and projects also take place regularly in Ikon's Events Room and Tower room.

Collection details

Decorative and Applied Art, Film and Media, Fine Art, Photography

Exhibition details are listed below, you may need to scroll down to see them all.

Nástio Mosquito

  • 3 February 2014 — 19 April 2015 *on now

Angolan artist Nastio Mosquito is one of the most energetic and versatile artists of his generation. Using music, photography, film and performance poetry, Mosquito comments on the nature of our globalised world.

His videos, which often dwell on contemporary art and its role in society, are knowingly politically-incorrect, referencing post-colonial clichés in a way that is both smart and funny. For Ikon, he proposes a sprawling site-specific installation.

David Tremlett

  • 4 December 2013 — 21 April 2014 *on now

David Tremlett (b. 1945) is best known for his large-scale site-specific wall drawings of geometric arrangements: abstract compositions of arcs, circles, trapezoids, text and line. Using pastel pigment applied by hand, Tremlett makes these compositions directly on architectural surfaces.

They are orchestrated to shift the viewer’s comprehension of a built environment, opening out, expanding and reducing, creating new vistas, geometric rhythms and pauses.

While at once being formally constructed compositions of purely abstract elements which emanate the sensual joy of colour, and illustrate relationships between straight and curved lines, they speak too of things experienced, seen and done by the artist.

A.K. Dolven

  • 3 February — 19 April 2014 *on now

Norwegian artist Anne Katrine Dolven shows her work alongside that of nineteenth century Norwegian painter Peder Balke (1804 - 87), renowned for his landscapes of the far north.

Dolven has identified with Balke as an artist now for many years, not simply because of the fundamental themes of his work conveyed through visions of the northern Norwegian landscape, but also he is an ancestor of hers by marriage.

For this exhibition, as well as presenting her own paintings and film, video, photography and sound installation, she will take paintings by Balke as found objects in order to engage him in a kind of artistic conversation, to take place between here and now and there and then.

Ikon Icons: John Salt

  • 19 February — 21 April 2014 *on now

Ikon invites five artists from each of its five decades to return to the gallery, presenting works in the Tower Room.

John Salt’s 1965 exhibition of photorealist paintings was the very first for Ikon, whilst Ian Emes’ 1973 film animation heralded the start of a brilliant career visualising the music of Pink Floyd.

Cornelia Parker worked with Ikon throughout the late 1980s, her 1988 show including the seminal work Thirty Pieces of Silver. Yinka Shonibare formed part of a generation of young British artists who energised the art world, exhibiting sculpture and installation at Ikon in 1999.

Lastly, Julian Opie’s instantly recognisable works filled Ikon and its surroundings in 2001.

Jamal Penjweny

  • 19 February — 21 April 2014 *on now

An exhibition of work by emerging artist Jamal Penjweny from Iraqi Kursdistan, including a number of photographic series that are as poignant and smart as they are formally straightforward.

Saddam is Here consists of twelve images of Iraqi people in familiar surroundings, each holding a life-size picture of Saddam Hussein’s face in front of their own. Saddam’s likeness becomes a mask obscuring any expression of emotion, any gaze, or possibility of sure identification and individuality.

It is ludicrous, hilarious and at the same time absolutely ominous, pointing up the insidious influence of a dictator. Another Life, a short film by Penjweny, follows some days in the lives of Iraqis smuggling alcohol from Iraq into Iran.

It has the grainy appeal of covert cell phone footage, and is very matter-of-fact in its editing. There is no melodrama, but the last moments are like an emotional hammerblow when, instead of rolling credits, we find ourselves reading paragraphs explaining how two of the men just introduced to us were killed by customs police a few days after filming.

Ikon Icons: Ian Emes

  • 30 April — 22 June 2014

Ikon invites five artists from each of its five decades to return to the gallery, presenting works in the Tower Room.

John Salt’s 1965 exhibition of photorealist paintings was the very first for Ikon, whilst Ian Emes’ 1973 film animation heralded the start of a brilliant career visualising the music of Pink Floyd.

Cornelia Parker worked with Ikon throughout the late 1980s, her 1988 show including the seminal work Thirty Pieces of Silver. Yinka Shonibare formed part of a generation of young British artists who energised the art world, exhibiting sculpture and installation at Ikon in 1999.

Lastly, Julian Opie’s instantly recognisable works filled Ikon and its surroundings in 2001.

Michel François

  • 30 April — 22 June 2014

This will be the most comprehensive UK exhibition to date of work by Belgian artist Michel François (b. 1956).

Comprising sculpture, film, paintings, prints and photography, it exemplifies the artist’s conviction that the meanings of a work of art are determined through its combination with others in relation to an exhibition space.

Visitors to Ikon will encounter an installation of numerous pieces to be read as a whole, integrated with the entire building. Such pervasiveness is fitting given the fundamental proposition of François’ work whereby art and life are deemed inextricable, and making reference specifically to sculpture, he observes, “L’art, de toute façon, c’est la vie que l’on sculpte” (“Art, afterall, is life sculpted.”)

Ikon Icons: Cornelia Parker

  • 2 July — 31 August 2014

Ikon invites five artists from each of its five decades to return to the gallery, presenting works in the Tower Room.

John Salt’s 1965 exhibition of photorealist paintings was the very first for Ikon, whilst Ian Emes’ 1973 film animation heralded the start of a brilliant career visualising the music of Pink Floyd.

Cornelia Parker worked with Ikon throughout the late 1980s, her 1988 show including the seminal work Thirty Pieces of Silver. Yinka Shonibare formed part of a generation of young British artists who energised the art world, exhibiting sculpture and installation at Ikon in 1999.

Lastly, Julian Opie’s instantly recognisable works filled Ikon and its surroundings in 2001.

Ikon 1980s

  • 2 July — 31 August 2014

A survey of Ikon’s programme from 1978 to 1989, Ikon 1980s is a highlight of our 50th anniversary year.

Following on from The Best Things in Life Happen Accidentally and This Could Happen to You - surveys of the 1960s and 1970s respectively (2004, 2009) - this is the third chapter in an ongoing account of art shown by the gallery since it opened in 1964.

The comprehensive selection of paintings, sculpture, installation, film and photography reviews a pivotal decade in British art history through the lens of a major British visual arts institution, highlighting the rise of postmodernism and the increasing popularity of installation. Ikon 1980s includes the work of such artists as Cornelia Parker, Vanley Burke, Helen Chadwick and Susan Hiller.

Ikon Icons: Yinka Shonibare

  • 10 September — 9 November 2014

Ikon invites five artists from each of its five decades to return to the gallery, presenting works in the Tower Room.

John Salt’s 1965 exhibition of photorealist paintings was the very first for Ikon, whilst Ian Emes’ 1973 film animation heralded the start of a brilliant career visualising the music of Pink Floyd.
Cornelia Parker worked with Ikon throughout the late 1980s, her 1988 show including the seminal work Thirty Pieces of Silver. Yinka Shonibare formed part of a generation of young British artists who energised the art world, exhibiting sculpture and installation at Ikon in 1999.

Lastly, Julian Opie’s instantly recognisable works filled Ikon and its surroundings in 2001.

Lee Bul

  • 10 September — 9 November 2014

This is the first UK solo exhibition for Lee Bul (b. 1964, Korea), considered one of the most important artists of her generation.

Lee Bul’s work is as visually compelling as it is intellectually sharp, preoccupied especially with gender politics and idealism expressed through modernism, science fiction and the development of technology.

This judicious survey includes early drawings, photographs and video (documenting performance), more sculptural pieces from the 1990s and ambitious later installations, including a new commission made possible through the Art Fund International scheme.

This latter piece, a suspended sculpture dripping with an excess of crystalline shapes and glass beads, references the exponential growth and unsustainability of the modern world, pointing up Lee Bul’s interest in the failings of utopian optimism.

Deutsche Bank Artist of the Year 2013: Imran Qureshi

  • 19 November 2014 — 25 January 2015

Imran Qureshi is Deutsche Bank’s 2013 ‘Artist of the Year’. Born in 1972 in Pakistan, he studied in Lahore at the National College of Arts with a major in miniature painting, a traditional discipline that he teaches there today.

Qureshi is one of the most important contemporary artists on the Subcontinent, not least because he reclaims the regionally and historically rooted discipline of miniature painting and transports it to the present day.

His work constitutes a unique synthesis of the genre’s motifs and techniques with current issues and the formal language of contemporary abstract painting. Qureshi incorporates personal observations on current affairs in Pakistan into his work, reiterating that violence can be encountered not only in his native country, but throughout the world.

Resources listed here may include websites, bookable tours and workshops, books, loan boxes and more. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all.

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