Centre for Chinese Contemporary Art

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The Centre for Chinese Contemporary Art (formerly Chinese Arts Centre) is leading the UK in exploring a changing international dynamic. Investigating the most exciting contemporary work coming out of China and East Asia today, CFCCA works with a wide array of partners to embrace a global century where Chinese art is moving firmly centre-stage.

CFFCA are leading the sector in showcasing Chinese contemporary art and visual culture, encouraging broader engagement with Chinese contemporary art through a lively and innovative programme of exhibitions, residencies, engagement projects, festivals, international projects and events.

Venue Type:

Gallery

Opening hours

Tues - Sun: 10.00 - 17.00
Mon: Closed

Closed: Bank & National Holidays

Admission charges

Centre for Chinese Contemporary Art is fully accessible. Admission is free

The main gallery is 150 metres sq and houses Chinese Arts Centre's curated exhibitions and takes in tours from the national and international scene.

The new building offers several ‘physical' facilities for artists' use. The project space of 50 sq. metres will be a studio for resident artists who are taking part in Chinese Art Centre's Breathe residency programme and a space for open studios. We also offer surgeries, advice and consultation services for artists as well as providing administrative support and IT facilities in a purpose built study/resources space.

To compliment our hugely successful artist-lead school workshops and outreach programme, the education suite has the very latest IT facilities available to enhance learning. This will mean that Chinese Arts Centre will continue to be at the forefront of disseminating information about Chinese creativity, from the traditional through to the contemporary. The education suite is also available for conference hire.

Collection details

Architecture, Decorative and Applied Art, Design, Film and Media, Fine Art, Performing Arts, Photography

Key artists and exhibits

  • Xu Bing; Liu Xiao Xian; Dinu Li; Ming Wong; Gordon Cheung; He An; Anthony Lam; Guo Wei; He Duoling; Shaoyinong and Muchen; Community Museum Project; William Yang; Ellinda Siu; Chun-Chao Chiu; Suki Chan
Exhibition details are listed below, you may need to scroll down to see them all.
Suki Chan, still from Lucida, (2016). Image courtesy of the artist.

Exhibition: Lucida, Suki Chan

  • 27 January — 30 April 2017

Weaving together extraordinary images, bio-medical research and individual testimonies, Lucida exposes the curious and complex relationship between the human eye, the brain and vision.
Working with a camera obscura, artist Suki Chan became intrigued by how our eyes receive images upside down, yet the brain processes and interprets them the correct way up. The mechanisms of our visual perception mean that at any given moment we actually see much less than we perceive. Our everyday experience of viewing a perfect and stable image of the world with ‘photographic’ detail is, in a certain sense, an illusion.
Viewers will be invited to use eye-tracking technology to reveal their own rapid eye movements - something we are normally unaware of. The multi-screen installation will reveal how visual information is modified and processed by the eye and the brain in real time.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly
Michael Wolf, My Favourite Thing, Mops, (2016).

Exhibition: A Private Public, Michael Wolf

  • 12 May — 18 June 2017

For over twenty years German photographer Michael Wolf has captured the hyper-density of the city of Hong Kong through his large-scale photographs. A Private Public presents Hong Kong’s seemingly endless industrial facades contrasted with an intimate perspective from within its hidden network of back alleys.

Since his arrival in the city in 1994, Wolf has been absorbed in an alternative urban culture, condensed and preserved within Hong Kong’s ‘laneways’. Somewhere between public and private spaces, these alleys are utilized by the population in a myriad of ways; forming shortcuts between the main thoroughfares, they also provide quiet resting places or much-needed storage space for residents.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly
Eason Tsang Ka Wai, House Work No.3, (2016). Image courtesy of the artist and Blindspot Gallery.

Exhibition: A Look at Looking, Eason Tsang Ka Wai

  • 12 May — 18 June 2017

Eason Tsang Ka Wai uses photography and experimental media to create artworks on the theme of living in the modern city, and his lens provides a unique perspective on the experience of living and working in his hometown – the rapidly-developing city of Hong Kong. Tsang’s imagery of both public and interior spaces explores poignant and universal issues faced by city-dwellers, such as the pressing desire for escape from the crowded urban environment and hidden anxieties about excessive modernisation.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly
Events details are listed below. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all. For events that don't have a specific date see the 'Resources' tab above.
Kirsty  Harris

KIRSTY HARRIS How I Learned to Stop Worrying (1945-2016)

  • 21 October 2016 — 22 January 2017 *on now

How I Learned to Stop Worrying (1945-2016) is an audio work whose name derives from the 1964 satirical film Dr Strangelove. It presents a musical account of every officially recorded nuclear explosion (including China) using eight instruments to represent each of the countries that partook. In the duration of the piece each second corresponds to a month in history and each new note depicts a specific bomb.

Accompanying the soundscape, Harris’ cyanotypes spill from above, the square inches of silk corresponding to the yield of China’s first atomic text in 1964. On wooden blocks around the space, delicate silverpoint drawings explore these fleeting moments of history with meticulous detail.

Suki Chan, installation shot of Lucida, (2016).

A Window On… Suki Chan’s Lucida

  • 16 February 2017 6-7pm

To coincide with her exhibition at CFCCA artist Suki Chan will be in conversation with Adam Galpin, Senior Lecturer in Psychology, University of Salford, to discuss the development of her project Lucida: how her interest in the subject began, her research methodologies and technical challenges. Adam Galpin was one of the scientists who contributed to the 3 channel interactive video work. He specialises in tracking eye-movements to understand how people process visual stimuli, having published on reading, driving, picture processing, Parkinson’s disease and the use of prosthetics.

Admission

PRICE: £3

A Window On… Hong Kong, the disappearing city

  • 20 April 2017 6-8pm

How do you live in a disappearing city? In this talk, researcher and writer En Liang Khong will explore the political and artistic legacy of Hong Kong’s ‘Umbrella Revolution’, as the city-state enters an era of unprecedented identity crises and (self-)censorship. From the Legislative Council through to film theatres, the politics and culture of Hong Kong are drenched in a profound anxiety over the future. Beginning with artworks that emerged during the 2014 democracy protests, through to recent exhibitions that traverse issues of national identity, En Liang Khong traces artistic production in Hong Kong as it is caught up in a ‘culture of disappearance’.

Admission

Price: £3

Samson Young, Dream FM (While the daylight lasts), (2015).

A Window On… Samson Young and the Hong Kong Pavilion

  • 15 June 2017 6-7pm

An artist and a composer, Samson Young studied music, philosophy and gender studies at the University of Sydney and then earned a PhD from Princeton University, in musical composition. His conceptual projects and installations deal extensively with the power and politics of sound. In 2015, he was awarded the inaugural BMW Art Journey Award and he will be representing Hong Kong at the 2017 Venice Biennale. Join us to discuss his unique and exciting practice and forthcoming projects.

Centre for Chinese Contemporary Art
Market Buildings
Thomas Street
Manchester
Greater Manchester
M4 1EU
England

Website

cfcca.org.uk

E-mail

admin@cfcca.org.uk

Telephone

0161 832 7271

Fax

0161 832 7513

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
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