In Pictures: National Museum of Flight to reopen after £3.6 million redevelopment

By Culture24 Reporter | 25 March 2016

Scotland's National Museum of Flight reopens in time for the Easter weekend. Here are some of the spectacular exhibits to expect

A photo of a set of historic planes at the National Museum of Flight in Edinburgh, Scotland
© Neil Hanna
Aircraft and objects from one of the most varied aviation collections in Europe are returning to the public gaze with two nationally significant Second World War hangars at the National Museum of Flight in East Lothian, reopening following a £3.6 million redevelopment.

A photo of a set of historic planes at the National Museum of Flight in Edinburgh, Scotland
© Courtesy National Museums Scotland
This Aero S-103 is a Czech-built version of MiG 15bis.

A photo of a set of historic planes at the National Museum of Flight in Edinburgh, Scotland
© Paul Dodds
An engineer installs a propellor on a 1942 Bristol Bolingbroke aircraft.

A photo of a set of historic planes at the National Museum of Flight in Edinburgh, Scotland
© Paul Dodds
Arabella Cotter, 7, plays with a model Spitfire in front of the Supermarine Spitfire.

A photo of a set of historic planes at the National Museum of Flight in Edinburgh, Scotland
© Courtesy National Museums Scotland
Hawker Sea Hawk, single-seat jet aircraft, with a Rolls-Royce Nene engine (1954).

A photo of a set of historic planes at the National Museum of Flight in Edinburgh, Scotland
© Courtesy National Museums Scotland
This instrument panel comes from a Phantom aircraft, from around 1970.

A photo of a set of historic planes at the National Museum of Flight in Edinburgh, Scotland
© Courtesy National Museums Scotland
More than 30 aircraft will go on display, ranging from the iconic Spitfire to an English Electric Lightning, the RAF’s first supersonic jet fighter, which could match the speed of Concorde.

A photo of a set of historic planes at the National Museum of Flight in Edinburgh, Scotland
© Courtesy National Museums Scotland
Assistant Curator Ian Brown with a pilot's log book.

A photo of a set of historic planes at the National Museum of Flight in Edinburgh, Scotland
© Paul Dodds
A conservator cleans the Avro Anson in the Civil Aviation Hangar.

A photo of a set of historic planes at the National Museum of Flight in Edinburgh, Scotland
© Paul Dodds
Highlights of the military hangar include the oldest surviving Hawker Siddeley Harrier jump jet, which was the world’s first vertical take-off combat aeroplane, and a rocket-powered Messerschmitt Me 163B-1a Komet, which was the fastest aircraft of the Second World War.

A photo of a set of historic planes at the National Museum of Flight in Edinburgh, Scotland
© Neil Hanna
One hangar displays military aircraft; the other commercial and leisure aircraft.

A photo of a set of historic planes at the National Museum of Flight in Edinburgh, Scotland
© Neil Hanna
Visitors can listen to the stories of, among others, a mother who gave birth aboard a Britten Norman Islander Air Ambulance; a woman who piloted Spitfires during the Second World War and the late Captain Eric ‘Winkle’ Brown, the former RAF pilot who flew more different types of aircraft than anyone else in history.

A photo of a set of historic planes at the National Museum of Flight in Edinburgh, Scotland
© Neil Hanna
The hangars were built in 1940-41 and were originally designed to last just a few years. Part of the East Fortune Airfield Scheduled Ancient Monument, they have been restored, insulated and heated for the first time using an environmentally friendly ground-source underfloor heating system.

A photo of a set of historic planes at the National Museum of Flight in Edinburgh, Scotland
© Neil Hanna
Scottish Government funding has paid for a new environmentally friendly ground-source underfloor heating system to be installed, making the hangars warm and inviting.

A photo of a set of historic planes at the National Museum of Flight in Edinburgh, Scotland
© BAE Systems, courtesy National Museums Scotland
A Prototype Striker Helmet, used in the Eurofighter Typhoon.

A photo of a set of historic planes at the National Museum of Flight in Edinburgh, Scotland
© Paul Dodds
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