Staff at the National Museum of the Royal Navy choose their favourite items

By Culture24 Staff | 03 June 2011
Staff at the National Museum of the Royal Navy at Portsmouth Historic Dockyard are marking Portsmouth’s enduring naval legacy by choosing their favourite museum items to celebrate the centenary year of a significant Naval Museum in the Dockyard.

Museum staff were asked to select their favourite objects or an object that had made a significant contribution to naval history from the collections...

A photo of a stone sculpture of Admiral Nelson's face
Former First Sea Lord of the United Kingdom and museum Trustees Chairman Sir Jonathan Band names Nelson's Death Mask as his object of choice from the National Museum of the Royal Navy's collections
A photo of an old typewriter in a wooden case
Enterprise Manager Giles Gould chooses codecracker the Enigma Machine. "It is an artefact that I see as having had a tangible impact on the course of world events," he says
A photo of a curved glass bottle on a light blue surface
Chief Operating Officer Graham Dobbin calls the Glass Bottle Recovered from Rubble at Hiroshima a "haunting, evocative and thought-provoking" exhibit
A photo of an oil painting of warships on the high seas
Head of Development Julian Thomas picks the Wyllie Panorama. "It was painted in 1929/30 to help people picture how the Battle of Trafalgar looked, to raise money for a new museum dedicated to the Victory and as the final expression of [William Lionel] Wyllie's great passion for ships and the sea. He died less than a year after completing it, aged 80"
A photo of the inside of a museum holding a long boat
Technician Bryn Jenkins chooses The Royal Barge of King Charles 2nd."I think that Nelson’s Funeral Barge would be my favorite item because it typifies the great esteem in which he was held by the nation," he explains

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