Patti Smith makes literary pilgrimage to play benefit gig for Brontë Parsonage Museum

By Richard Moss | 25 January 2013
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It might seem like a long journey from the punk heyday of New York’s CBGBs to the calm interior of the Brontë Parsonage in Yorkshire, but for singer- songwriter, poet and artist Patti Smith, it is a natural literary pilgrimage.

The Patti Smith album sleeve, Horses, with a black and white portrait of Patti Smith on the cover
Patti Smith's 1975 album Horses was an influential early punk rock record, but it also signalled a literary approach to songwriting
The influential figure in the New York punk scene of the 1970s has always been one of music’s more literary inclined songwriters, and now she is to give a special performance in Haworth in support of the Brontë Museum following a visit in 2012.

The gig, which sold out almost immediately, is billed as “an evening of Words and Music”, and will take place at the Old Schoolroom in Haworth (originally built by Patrick Brontë in 1832) on April 19 2013.

It continues a fascination with British literary heritage for Smith who, since her punk beginnings, has published five books and exhibited her artwork worldwide. In 2003 she took up a summer residency at Charleston Farmhouse, the Sussex Bloomsbury bolthole, after admitting an obsession with Virginia Woolf.

For the museum, the gig also continues a recent tradition of celebrating and showcasing the ways successive generations of artists and writers have been inspired by the Brontës' lives and works.

“It is yet another example of the ways in which the Brontës’ extraordinary legacy influences all aspects of contemporary culture,” says Arts Officer Jenna Holmes.

“This will be a remarkable evening.”

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