Who would you pick as a Radical Hero? People's History Museum names list of 100

By Culture24 Reporter | 18 November 2014

People's History Museum compiles list of 100 people who changed the course of British history

Click on the picture to launch a gallery of Radical Heroes

In a reception at the House of Commons, the People’s History Museum has launched a fundraising campaign which owes much to the cult of personality.

Winston Churchill, Margaret Thatcher and Tony Blair are part of it, as well as Viv Anderson – the first black player for England – George Orwell and leading feminist figures including Nancy Aston, the country’s first sitting MP, and suffragist writer and activist Charlotte Despard.

Over the next few months, the museum wants 100 people or groups to sponsor each Radical Hero, costing £3,000 in a Join the Radicals scheme which will support collections, exhibitions and a learning programme beginning with the Peterloo Massacre in 1819.

“The radicals are men and women who dared to challenge convention and fight for revolutionary ideas," calling the likes of Karl Marx and Michael Foot "the true champions of our nation".

"The support we hope to achieve through the campaign will help to ensure that these stories can continue to be shared and celebrated.”


Who would you put in your top 100? Leave a comment below.

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