Artists use Blue Crystal Ball to communicate Olympic legacy to the next generation

By Ruth Hazard | 10 August 2012
© Kota Ezawa
Exhibition: Blue Crystal Ball: Samsung Olympic Games Media Art Collection, De La Warr Pavillion, Bexhill-on-Sea, August 11-12; AND Festival, Manchester, August 29 - September 2 2012

An International Olympic Committee commission which asked a group of contemporary artists to create works to "communicate the Olympic legacy to future generations", this film reveals how the Games can offer something different to everyone.

The nine artists involved in the project, who hail from destinations around the globe, have produced a collection of single-channel videos reflecting the values of the Olympics from their own unique perspectives.

© Kota Ezawa
For Kota Ezawa, this has seen the creation of Jump Cut, a black and white ink animation based on archival footage of Olympic competitions dating back as far as the 1920s, while Susan Pui San Lok considers visual and cultural rhetoric around nation, unity and sport.

Kimsooja captures the spirit of the Olympic Games with a multi-layered projection containing the flags of every nation, layered on top of one another in a symbol of unity.

The Children’s Games, by Torsten Lauschmann, visits the world of street and playground games around the world, while Hiraki Sawa explores the psychological endurance of athletes and Yeondoo Jung looks at sport as a metaphor for love.

“Each artwork explores and reflects on the Olympic ideals and creates new narratives and visual epiphanies,” says the IOC’s Jiyoon Lee, who commissioned the project.

“Like fortune-tellers gazing into a crystal ball, they show us aspects of sport and life we have not seen before.”

  • Runs 10am-8pm (6pm August 12) in Bexhill, 12pm-6pm Manchester. Admission free.
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