Piddington Roman Villa Museum

Piddington Roman Villa Museum
Chapel End
Piddington, Northampton
Northamptonshire
NN7 2DD
England

Website

www.unas.org.uk/magazine/magview.php?ID=3&date=0509

Telephone

01604 870312

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
Library icon Study area icon

Housed in a former Wesleyan chapel, the museum displays some of the many finds made during the long running excavation of the Piddington Roman Villa over 25 years, and still on-going.

Apart from the displays, the building houses stores for the many found objects. There are also displays of how it may have been to be alive in Roman Britain. It also has a library and study room.

The Upper Nene Archaeological Society originally bought the redundant and de-consecrated Wesleyan chapel in 1992. The intervening period involved restoration, conversion and fund raising. This work was finally rewarded with a substantial grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Venue Type:

Museum, Heritage site, Archaeological site

Opening hours

Open Sunday Afternoons

1st Oct to 31st Mar - 2pm to 4pm
1st Apr to 30th Sep - 2pm to 5pm

(otherwise by arrangement
call 01604 870312)

Admission charges

Admission Rates: Adult £3.50 Child, OAP, Group & Concession £2.00

Members and Friends of UNAS, ARA and YAC are admitted free
of charge, but a YAC member must be accompanied by an adult.

(Concessionary rate applies to the residents of the parishes of
Horton, Hackleton, Piddington, Preston Deanery & Poppyridge)

Additional info

Our education programme is designed by a qualified, practising teacher and acts as an exciting hands on support to the National Curriculum and QCA schemes of work for History and Religious Education, All visiting schools continually rate us as excellent and state they would visit again.

Apart from significant archaeological material it houses displays interpreting 500 years of life at the settlement, including: a detailed model of the villa, as in the later 2nd century; a full-sized mannequin of a possible owner of the villa called Tiberius Claudius Severus, with an audio presentation; a full-scale reconstruction of sections of a typical roof and hypocaust, the Roman heating system.

Collection details

Archaeology, Coins and Medals, Social History, World Cultures, Design, Architecture

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