Brighton Photo Biennial 2010: Five to see at the Fringe Part Two

By Ben Miller Published: 05 October 2010

A photo of an orange and white wall
© Peripheral Vision
Peripheral Vision
Artists Ingrid Plum and Karen Tilley bring their findings to
one of the Fringe's more unusual venues, a Japanese restaurant opposite the town hall, having grabbed their lenses and headed out into the city with the brief
of subverting "everyday living in Brighton".

Moshi Moshi, Octagon, Bartholomew Square, until November 14. Open 12pm-10.30pm.




A black and white photo of a naked woman and a slab of meat
© Svetlana K-Lie
Meat
Russian Svetlana K-Lie's work has been called "challenging", a catatonic understatement for this "visceral theatre" of blood, skin, hide, feather, bull, pig, rooster and naked women. It looks like a gory play staged somewhere between an abattoir and a butcher's.

One9seven
, High St, Lewes,
until Nov 14. Mon and Tues 11.30am-3pm, Wed-Fri 9.30am-3pm and 6.30pm-10pm, Sat 9am-10pm, Sun 9am-3pm.




A photo of a wide American freeway
© Kit Fordham
Bascom Avenue: The Analogue Streets of Silicon Valley
Kit Fordham
likes the other side of places, relishing the faded seaside glamour of Brighton or monks in the hills of Bulgaria. This time he heads to a section of San Jose perpetually caught in an anachronistic galaxy of "1970s cars, 1960s bungalow and 1950s signage". No skyscrapers here.

JB's American Diner, Kings Road, until Oct 24. Mon-Fri 12pm-11pm (Sat and Sun 9am-11pm).




A black and white photo of a film star
© Brian Duffy
Duffy: The Third Man
Remember the album cover for Aladdin Sane, David Bowie's sixth album where the alien superstar covers his hollowed cheekbones with a red and blue lightning strike which shadows his waifish torso? It was made by Brian Duffy, one of the coolest fashion photographers of the 1960s and 1970s. Find out why at this retrospective.

Lucy Bell, Norman Road, St-Leonards-on-Sea, until Nov 16. Tues-Sat 11am-4pm.




A photo of a man sitting next to a hippo head
© Rachel Cunningham
Rachel Cunningham
In Rachel Cunningham's Quiet Transfer series, the artist travelled to Israel in an attempt to convey issues of territory, conflict and colonialism. Taking landscapes of houses demolished by Israeli forces and adding still life pieces taken from the remnants, the results are unsettling surfaces and deserted spaces.

Otter Gallery, College Lane, University of Chichester. 9am-5pm (10am-4pm Fri-Sun).




Logo for the Brighton Photo Biennial
Culture24 at the Brighton Photo Biennial 2010:
Martin Parr on curating the festival
Artist's Statement: Alejandro Chaskielberg
Inside The House of Vernacular at Fabrica
Artist Molly Landreth on Queer Brighton
Video: Alec Soth on Brighton Picture Hunt
Artist's Statement: Stephen Gill
Our preview of the Brighton Photo Fringe
Five to see at the Fringe: Part One
Behind the Scenes: Three Views of Brighton
John Deakin's Gods and Monsters in Chichester
Laura Burgess on the education programme
"Cutting edge" programme announced for 2010