Nunnery Gallery

Nunnery Gallery

The Nunnery is a contemporary art space run by Bow Arts. It is located in the heart of London’s Artist Quarter and a stone’s throw from the Olympic Park.

Venue Type:

Artist studio or collective, Gallery

Opening hours

Tues to Sun, 10am - 5pm

Admission charges

Free

Getting there

The gallery is located on "Bow Arts Lane" which lies between 181 and 183 Bow Road, opposite to Bow Church. It is a six minute walk from Bow Road Tube Station, or 3 minutes from Bow Church DLR. We are step free and fully wheelchair accessible.

Exhibition details are listed below, you may need to scroll down to see them all.
view from the Nunnery Gallery on the ground floor of a former nineteenth-century convent

Traces of the Future

  • 27 January — 26 March 2017 *on now

The Amani – meaning peace in Kiswahili – Hill Research Station lies deep in a Tanzanian rainforest, suspended as a capsule of dreams high on a mountain range. We invite audiences to explore this intriguing and beautiful place, through Russian photographer Evgenia Arbugaeva’s 12 celebrated photographs – as featured in December 2016’s National Geographic – together with 11 new photo works and three new films from renowned multi-media artist Mariele Neudecker, all made on a residency in Amani.

The exhibition follows the anthropological and historical research project ‘Memorials and remains of medical science in Africa’, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), that through artist residencies and re-enactment explored new and exciting cross-overs between anthropology and art. One of the biggest of its kind in Africa, the Amani station was built in the late nineteenth-century and has hosted researchers from all over the world across its originally colonial history. Held in an intriguing state of both use and preservation, some of the site exists exactly as it was in the 1970s; the objects of which reveal the stories and aspirations behind the people and the science that was pioneered here. A selection of objects will surround the artwork, from original specimens – bottled snakes, butterflies and flies – to maps and experimental equipment, inviting you to explore and meditate on these objects that draw lines into our own past, our understanding of the present world, and its future.

A programme of events will accompany the exhibition, enabling further discussion around the themes and ideas its work explores.

Curated by Greer Crawley with support from Buckinghamshire New University and with special thanks to Prof. Wenzel Paul Geissler (University of Oslo), National Institute for Medical Research, Amani Medical Research Centre and the Booth Museum of Natural History.

Website

http://www.bowarts.org/nunnery/traces-of-the-future

Photography by Evgenia Arbugaeva

First Thursday Late Opening

  • 2 March 2017 6-9pm

Celebrate First Thursday at the Nunnery Gallery with Traces of the Future, which showcases new work from Evgenia Arbugaeva and Mariele Neudecker, with original objects and materials collected during historical-anthropological research at Amani Hill Research Station, Tanzania. The exhibition tour, led by the Gallery Co-Director and beginning at 7.30pm, will help audiences delve into the history, hopes and dreams that lie behind this original exhibition, guided by the intriguing images and objects on display.

The Amani – meaning peace in Kiswahili – Hill Research Station lies deep in a Tanzanian rainforest, suspended as a capsule of dreams high on a mountain range. We invite audiences to explore this intriguing and beautiful place, through Russian photographer Evgenia Arbugaeva’s 12 celebrated photographs – as featured in December 2016’s National Geographic – together with 11 new photo works and three new films from renowned multi-media artist Mariele Neudecker, all made on a residency in Amani.

The exhibition follows the anthropological and historical research project ‘Memorials and remains of medical science in Africa’, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), that through artist residencies and re-enactment explored new and exciting cross-overs between anthropology and art. One of the biggest of its kind in Africa, the Amani station was built in the late nineteenth-century and has hosted researchers from all over the world across its originally colonial history. Held in an intriguing state of both use and preservation, some of the site exists exactly as it was in the 1970s; the objects of which reveal the stories and aspirations behind the people and the science that was pioneered here. A selection of objects will surround the artwork, from original specimens – bottled snakes, butterflies and flies – to maps and experimental equipment, inviting you to explore and meditate on these objects that draw lines into our own past, our understanding of the present world, and its future.

Curated by Greer Crawley with support from Buckinghamshire New University and with special thanks to Prof. Wenzel Paul Geissler (University of Oslo), National Institute for Medical Research, Amani Medical Research Centre and the Booth Museum of Natural History.

Website

http://www.bowarts.org/nunnery/first-thursday-late-opening-2

Events details are listed below. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all. For events that don't have a specific date see the 'Resources' tab above.
picture by Evgenia Arbugaeva

Art and Anthropology: from Archive to future

  • 9 March 2017 7-9pm

"When we evoke the archive, what are we conjuring by way of inclusion and exclusion? What, for instance, is the difference between an archive and a collection or between an archive and a hoard or between an archivist and a collector and a hoarder?"
Elizabeth Povinelli, “The Woman on the Other Side of the Wall: Archiving the Otherwise in Postcolonial Digital Archives”, Duke University Press

Through a film screening and panel event with the Anthropology department at Goldsmiths, University of London, this event will examine the cross-overs between art and anthropology, from the archive to the making of new work, held in conjunction with the Traces of the Future exhibition.

Many years ago Matthew Stock was fortunate enough to view the conceptual archival artwork Lifework by Babak Ghazi at the Raven Row Gallery. This was an immense collection of the artists entire life, viewed through the archive of meticulously indexed and categorised lever arch files. These served to create an alternative structure for the production and engagement with objects, things and ideas. Ghazi was creating an alternative future with the archive at its centre.

In Traces of the Future, the artwork of Arbugaeva and Neudecker, made alongside the anthropological field work led by Prof. Wenzel Paul Geissler at the Amani Hill Research Centre, also re-imagines possible futures from the archive. It could be said that conceptual artists utilise the archive as a form of entry point to produce an engagement with objects, things and ideas. Anthropologists, on the other hand, think with the archive as a way of contextualising their field and research.

These two positions are interesting as they open up an important question: how does the archive become a space where conceptual artists and anthropologists meet, affect each other and in what ways can their practices combine?

Both positions are working through the same space but with different media and in different political authorities. Art and Anthropology: from Archive to future will look at how artists and anthropologists engage in a conversation with a future archive as a way of redefining how we think and feel about a collection of things, objects and natural artefacts.

Panel: Dr E. Gabriel Dattatreyan (Film and Panel); Prof. Sophie Day; Dr Ricardo Leizaola (Film and Panel); Dr. Mike Pearson; Dr Pauline Von Hellermann; Dr Martyn Wemyss
Led by Matthew Stock.

Admission

£3

Website

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/art-and-anthropology-from-archive-to-future-tickets-31510280096?ref=estw

Getting there

The gallery is located on "Bow Arts Lane" which lies between 181 and 183 Bow Road, opposite to Bow Church. It is a six minute walk from Bow Road Tube Station, or 3 minutes from Bow Church DLR. We are step free and fully wheelchair accessible.

Nunnery Gallery
181 Bow Road
London
Greater London
E3 2SJ
England

Website

www.bowarts.org/nunnery

E-mail

nunnery@bowarts.com

Telephone

020 8980 7774

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
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