Faber Archive

Faber Archive
The Archive
Faber and Faber Ltd
Bloomsbury House
74-77 Great Russell Street
London
Greater London
WC1B 3DA
England

Website

www.faber.co.uk/archive/

E-mail

archiveenquiries@faber.co.uk

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
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With a distinguished history stretching back to the mid-1920s, and featuring many of the greatest literary and artistic figures of the twentieth century, Faber and Faber has preserved a unique publishing archive.

This is still an integral part of the company, and is used to support new editions, but is a great potential resource for anyone interested to learn more about the firm and its great authors.

Faber and Faber was created in 1929 by Geoffrey Faber, the successor to Faber & Gwyer (founded in 1925). Geoffrey Faber was Chairman of both, and it was he who brought in T. S. Eliot as an editorial director in 1925. Eliot was an inspired appointment: Faber described him as 'a man who combines literary gifts with business instincts ... and who is quite as much at home on the lower levels as on the lonely peaks' of publishing. Other directors included Walter de la Mare’s son, Richard, who was responsible for the design of Faber books.

The archive records the impressive range and startling originality of Faber and Faber’s publications. The early poetry list - largely the creation of T. S. Eliot - is perhaps best-known, and arguably the best documented part of the archive. Faber poets were a major literary voice of the inter-war years, and include Eliot himself, Ezra Pound, W. H. Auden, Stephen Spender, and Louis MacNeice. However, the archive also contains wonderful material on a whole host of other areas in which Faber and Faber were active, including books on farming and gardening, and art and architecture.

Venue Type:

Archive

Opening hours

The Faber archive is currently not open to external researchers. We will continue, however, to respond to queries about any aspects of Faber’s publishing history.

Closed to the public.

Admission charges

N/A

Additional info

The Faber archive is currently not open to external researchers. We will continue, however, to respond to queries about any aspects of Faber’s publishing history. And we hope to progressively increase the amount of archive material that can be made available via the website.

Collection details

Archives

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