Leo Baeck Institute

Leo Baeck Institute London logo

The Leo Baeck Institute is named after Leo Baeck, the last public representative of the Jewish community in Nazi Germany, and was founded in 1955 by the Council of Jews from Germany. It is the mission of the Institute to preserve for posterity the history and culture of German-speaking Jewry.

The London LBI organises a broad range of events such as lecture programmes and international conferences, both in the UK and abroad, as well as funding fellowships. The Institute has recently established two research professorships to investigate the role of German-speaking Jews in 19th and 20th century academe.

In its role as an educational charity the London LBI provides information to the general public, advises scholars and students engaged in research on German-Jewish history, collects archival material for the New York Leo Baeck Institute, acts as referee to organisations funding scholarships, vets manuscripts submitted to publishers in the UK, Germany and the United States, and acts as examiner for doctoral and masters candidates in British universities.

Venue Type:

Association or society

Opening hours

Mon-Thu 10-5
Fri 10-3

Admission charges

free

Events details are listed below. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all. For events that don't have a specific date see the 'Resources' tab above.

European Leo Baeck Institute Lecture Series, London 2016–17 The Legacy of the Left and Israel: 1967-2017

  • 24 November 2016 — 16 February 2017 *on now

This season´s topic intends to discuss the complicated and multi-layered relationship of the European Left with Zionism and the State of Israel. We will examine this broad subject from a historical perspective and will shed light on the different debates in various European countries.

Dr Daniel Wildmann (Director, Leo Baeck Institute London) has pleasure in inviting you to the first lecture in the series:


Dr Brian Klug (University of Oxford)

Denouncing Israel: Anti-colonialism or Antisemitism on the British Left?

6.30pm, 24th November 2017


A significant part of the British left, especially since the June 1967 war, tends to denounce Israel as a state and Zionism as an idea. Ostensibly, these attitudes are grounded in the anti-colonialism and anti-racism which have been staple causes for the British left since the sun began to set on the Empire. These grounds, however, are called into question by those who detect the hidden hand of antisemitism at work. The lecture will examine key concepts and arguments in this controversy, seeking to bring the issues into sharper focus.

Brian Klug is Senior Research Fellow in Philosophy at St. Benet’s Hall, Oxford, a member of the faculty of philosophy at the University of Oxford, and Honorary Fellow of the Parkes Institute for the Study of Jewish/non-Jewish Relations, University of Southampton. His most recent books are Words of Fire: Selected Essays of Ahad Ha'am (2015), Being Jewish and Doing Justice (2011) and Offence: The Jewish Case (2009).

Admission

Admission is free but places are strictly limited and must be reserved in advance by contacting the Leo Baeck Institute, London (email info@leobaeck.co.uk or phone 020 7882 5690).

Website

http://www.leobaeck.co.uk/archives/5238

European Leo Baeck Institute Lecture Series, London 2016–17 The Legacy of the Left and Israel: 1967-2017

  • 8 December 2016 From 6:30pm *on now

This season´s topic intends to discuss the complicated and multi-layered relationship of the European Left with Zionism and the State of Israel. We will examine this broad subject from a historical perspective and will shed light on the different debates in various European countries.

On behalf of Dr Daniel Wildmann (Director, Leo Baeck Institute London) we have pleasure in inviting you to the second lecture of this season´s Leo Baeck Institute lecture series:

Prof Christina Späti (University of Fribourg, CH)
The German-speaking Left and Israel:
Legacies and Developments since 1948
6.30pm, 8th December 2016


The positions and attitudes of the political left in Germany, Austria and Switzerland towards Israel have undergone many changes since 1948. If the 1950s and 1960s were characterized by a romanticizing, pro-Zionist alignment with Israel, mainly expressed by Social-democratic parties and trade unions, the rise of the New Left after 1968 considerably changed the perspectives on the Middle East conflict and eventually had an impact on wider sections of the political left. The lecture will also look into the various legacies, ranging from the Holocaust to Internationalism, which influenced this development.

Christina Späti is Associate Professor of Contemporary History at the University of Fribourg, Switzerland. She received her PhD in 2003 with a thesis on the Swiss left and its positions on Israel and Zionism between 1967 and 1991. Her research focuses on processes of dealing with the National Socialist past, anti-Zionism, antisemitism and Orientalism, language politics in
multilingual states, and 1968 in Western Europe, with a particular emphasis on Switzerland.

Admission

Admission is free but places are strictly limited and must be reserved in advance by contacting the Leo Baeck Institute, London (email info@leobaeck.co.uk or phone 020 7882 5690).

Website

http://www.leobaeck.co.uk/archives/5333

Leo Baeck Institute
2nd Floor, Arts Two Building
Queen Mary, University of London
Mile End Road
London
Greater London
E1 4NS
England

Website

www.leobaeck.co.uk

E-mail

info@leobaeck.co.uk

Telephone

020 7882 5690

Fax

020 7882 6901

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
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