Bishopsgate Institute

Bishopsgate Institute
230 Bishopsgate
London
City of London
EC2M 4QH
England

Website

www.bishopsgate.org.uk

E-mail

General

enquiries@bishopsgate.org.uk

Library

library@bishopsgate.org.uk

Telephone

Reception, Administration, Grants, and Cultural Events Enquiries

020 7392 9200

Bishopsgate Library

020 7392 9270

Fax

Reception, Administration, Grants, and Cultural Events Enquiries

020 7392 9250

Bishopsgate Library

020 7392 9275

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
Bishopsgate Institute
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Bishopsgate Institute is based in a beautiful Grade II* listed building in central London. Since 1895, we have provided an independent meeting place for people with shared interests to learn about a vast array of subjects.

We offer a diverse range of activities, including: a library which holds important collections on the history of London and the labour, co-operative, freethought and humanist movements, a Courses for Adults programme and a programme of Cultural Events which range from music concerts to talks and debates.

Venue Type:

Library, Archive, Heritage site

Opening hours

Mon - Fri 9.30-17.30

Closed: Sat, Sun

Admission charges

Free

Events details are listed below. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all. For events that don't have a specific date see the 'Resources' tab above.

The John Lilburne 400th Anniversary Conference

  • 14 March 2015 11am-5pm

Born 400 years ago, John Lilburne’s courage and passion for justice was unfailing during the turbulent years of the English Revolution. Whipped, pilloried and often imprisoned in his lifetime, John Lilburne was a Leveller activist and pamphleteer who campaigned for radical change. He fought to establish many of the liberties and political freedoms that we take for granted today. He was a champion of popular sovereignty, trial by jury and the rights of the ordinary citizen.

Don’t miss this one-day celebration of the life and legacy of ‘Freeborn John’.

Suitable for

Admission

£12.00 per person
£10.00 concessions

Website

http://www.bishopsgate.org.uk/event/526/The-John-Lilburne-400th-Anniversary-Conference?&Keyword=&TypeID=Talks%20and%20Discussions

Rebel Footprints: A Guide to Uncovering London’s Radical History

  • 18 March 2015 7:30-9pm

David Rosenberg’s Rebel Footprints brings to life the history of 19th to mid-20th century social movements in the capital. From the Suffragettes to the Socialists, from the Chartists to the Trade Unionists, this book invites us to step into the footprints of a diverse cast of dedicated fighters for social justice.

Self-directed walks pair with narratives that seamlessly blend history, politics and geography in this radical response to conventional heritage tours.

Suitable for

Admission

£9.00 per person
£7.00 concessions

Website

http://www.bishopsgate.org.uk/event/555/Rebel-Footprints-A-Guide-to-Uncovering-London%E2%80%99s-Radical-History?&Keyword=&TypeID=Talks%20and%20Discussions

London in Fiction: May Day

  • 24 March 2015 7:30-9pm

First released in 1936, May Day is a politically-charged, highly-original novel by John Sommerfield based around a strike in east London and a subsequent protest march into the West End. There is no central character to this experimental work, the tension building across a range of individuals as the dispute escalates ending, ultimately, in tragedy. The influential May Day was Sommerfield’s debut novel.

Republished as part of the ongoing London Classics series from London Books, this edition was made possible by the generosity of the Rail, Maritime and Transport (RMT) union and three of its officials – Bob Crow, Alex Gordon and Brian Denny. This event considers May Day and how it remains as relevant now as when it was written, at the same time acting as a tribute to the late Bob Crow by two of his friends.

Suitable for

Admission

£9.00 per person
£7.00 concessions

Website

http://www.bishopsgate.org.uk/event/558/London-in-Fiction-May-Day?&Keyword=&TypeID=Talks%20and%20Discussions

Dogs of the First World War: Dogs and the Home Front in the First World War

  • 26 March 2015 7:30-9pm

Dogs played a significant role in the Great War, perpetuating the idea of canine loyalty and sacrifice. However, the association of dogs with Britishness on the Home Front was less secure. Specific breeds such as the Dachshund became unpopular, and the threat of food shortages made the keeping and breeding seem an expensive and unpatriotic luxury.

This talk discusses the ambiguous place of dogs in wartime Britain - their role in the articulation of patriotic sentiment, but also their vulnerability in a time of national crisis.

Suitable for

Admission

£9.00 per person
£7.00 concessions

Website

http://www.bishopsgate.org.uk/event/559/Dogs-of-the-First-World-War-Dogs-and-the-Home-Front-in-the-First-World-War?&Keyword=&TypeID=Talks%20and%20Discussions

Dogs of the First World War: My Robot, My Friend

  • 11 April 2015 2:30-4pm

Aristotle said we should have the right kind of people to be our friends - good people who wish us well, and who are our equals. It won't be long before robot friends can be tailor-made to our needs. But could we relate to them as friends? Could they have genuine affection for us, or could they only fake it? And would it be wrong to switch them off when we got bored with them?

The discussion will be chaired by Richard Baron, philosopher and author whose books include Projects and Values and Deliberation and Reason.

No advance booking required
please note places are limited and allocated on a first-come, first-served basis.

Suitable for

Website

http://www.bishopsgate.org.uk/event/548/Dogs-of-the-First-World-War-My-Robot-My-Friend?&Keyword=&TypeID=Talks%20and%20Discussions

The Inaugural C R Ashbee Memorial Lecture: The Seven Dark Arts of Developers

  • 14 April 2015 7:30-9pm

The East End Preservation Society and Bishopsgate Institute are delighted to present the Inaugural C R Ashbee Memorial Lecture. This lecture honours C R Ashbee (1863 – 1942) as founder of the Guild of Handicrafts in the East End, as a pioneer of the Conservation Movement, and a progressive architect and designer whose influence was seminal upon Frank Lloyd Wright among many others.

London's planning system isn't working. Across the city, policies are continually flouted, affordable housing quotas waived, height limits breached and the interests of residents endlessly trampled, as our streets are bullied by ever more bloated developments. In this lecture Oliver Wainwright will unpick the forces that are making the city a meaner and more divided place, as public assets are relentlessly sold off and entire council estates flattened to make room for silos of luxury safe-deposit boxes in the sky. From the slippery spreadsheets of viability assessments to the exploitation of planning loopholes, it will shine a light on the darker sides of how the city gets made.

Suitable for

Website

http://www.bishopsgate.org.uk/event/560/The-Inaugural-C-R-Ashbee-Memorial-Lecture-The-Seven-Dark-Arts-of-Developers?&Keyword=&TypeID=Talks%20and%20Discussions

LGBT London in the 1980s – the Media and the 'Loony Left'

  • 21 April 2015 7:30-9pm

The success of the recent film Pride has sparked new interest in the history of LGBT activism in the 1980s.

A prominent and outspoken campaigner for equalities then as now, Linda Bellos OBE will reflect on her experiences as leader of Lambeth Council during the late 1980s and the ‘Loony Left’ label. This was a pejorative characterisation widely disseminated in the British popular press of some Labour-run local authorities across the UK whose leaders were outspoken critics of Thatcher’s policies. Linda Bellos will be joined by Colin Clews, author of the informative and popular blog ‘Gay in the 80s’, who will describe the broader historical context for LGBT people living in the UK at this time.

Suitable for

Admission

£9.00 per person
£7.00 concessions

Website

http://www.bishopsgate.org.uk/event/561/LGBT-London-in-the-1980s-%E2%80%93-the-Media-and-the-Loony-Left?&Keyword=&TypeID=Talks%20and%20Discussions

London in Fiction: London in Fact and Fiction: Gypsy Joe and the Fight for Justice

  • 23 April 2015 7:30-9pm

In his award-winning autobiography Gypsy Joe, bare-knuckle fighter turned golfer Joe Smith tells the story of a life of achievement in the face of prejudice. Joe’s grandfather Rymer, himself a boxer, was a key influence in Joe’s life, persuading him to turn away from violence and take up the gentler sport of golf. Gypsy Joe is a moving account of the highs and lows of the path that Joe Smith followed after witnessing the death of his grandfather.

At this event author and Director of London Books, Martin Knight, will be interviewing Joe, as well as talking about the London Classics release There Ain’t No Justice by James Curtis, a novel first published in 1937. This novel has a similar boxing backdrop and the central character, Tommy Mutch, has much in common with Joe Smith – both are West Londoners, both were ‘preliminary boys’ and both fought for justice.

Suitable for

Admission

£9.00 per person
£7.00 concessions

Website

http://www.bishopsgate.org.uk/event/562/London-in-Fiction-London-in-Fact-and-Fiction-Gypsy-Joe-and-the-Fight-for-Justice?&Keyword=&TypeID=Talks%20and%20Discussions

Dogs of the First World War: Animal Rights and Wrongs

  • 25 April 2015 2:30-4pm

“The assumption that animals are without rights and the illusion that our treatment of them has no moral significance is a positively outrageous example of Western crudity and barbarity,” said Arthur Schopenhauer, not generally known as a tender hearted ethicist. Does he have a point? Do animals have rights? If so are they like human rights? Do we really owe them anything? In this discussion we will explore the nature of our moral responsibilities to animals.

The discussion will be chaired by Anja Steinbauer, president of Philosophy for All, co-editor of Philosophy Now and co-founder of the London School of Philosophy. Anja also teaches Philosophy at Bishopsgate Institute.

Suitable for

Website

http://www.bishopsgate.org.uk/event/550/Dogs-of-the-First-World-War-Animal-Rights-and-Wrongs?&Keyword=&TypeID=Talks%20and%20Discussions

Dogs of the First World War: Animals of War

  • 28 April 2015 7:30-9pm

Whenever men have taken up arms, dogs have followed them into war. Roman mosaics and Attic vases show them with their warrior masters and they are often to be found on medieval sarcophagi at the feet of fallen knights. In more recent times, they have followed troops into Afghanistan and Iraq as mine detection dogs. But never perhaps in the history of warfare has their importance been so great as on the Western Front in the First World War. While new military technology reduced the importance of the horse in battle, the dog became indispensable.

They were selected with great care – the Airedale was considered the most suitable – and trained to carry out their tasks as messengers, carriers and to locate the wounded, all in the heat of battle with gunfire and explosions around them.

In this talk Juliet Gardiner will discuss the ways in which dogs and other animals fought alongside their masters, their contribution to victory and the high price they often paid.

Suitable for

Admission

£9.00 per person
£7.00 concessions

Website

http://www.bishopsgate.org.uk/event/563/Dogs-of-the-First-World-War-Animals-of-War?&Keyword=&TypeID=Talks%20and%20Discussions

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