Cathedral of the Dormition of the Mother of God and All Saints

Cathedral of the Dormition of the Mother of God and All Saints
67 Ennismore Gardens
London
Greater London
SW7 1NH
England

Website

www.sourozh.org/rocl/The_Diocesan_Cathedral

Telephone

020 7584 0096

Fax

020 7584 9864

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.

Welcome to the Cathedral of the Dormition of the Mother of God and All Saints, one of the main places of Orthodox worship in London. This church is the cathedral of the diocese of Sourozh, which is a diocese of the Russian Orthodox Church (Patriarchate of Moscow) covering the British Isles.

This parish originated in 1716 as the chapel of the Russian Embassy. In 1923 it moved to St. Philip’s Church, Buckingham Palace Road, and then in 1956 to this church (formerly the Anglican parish church of All Saints, a daughter church of St Margaret’s, Westminster). With the help of many friends, we were able to purchase the building in 1979.

Built in 1849 by Lewis Vulliamy, it is modelled on the eleventh century basilica of San Zeno Maggiore in Verona. The West front was rebuilt in 1892 by Harrison Townsend. Particularly noteworthy is the decoration above the tall arches executed by Heywood Sumner in sgraffito, a technique in which a superficial layer of plaster is cut away to reveal underlying colours. Above the arch over the east end of the cathedral is the figure of Christ on the Cross, with the four evangelists represented by their symbols. At the west end are six circular designs indicating the six days of Creation. The murals along the upper parts of the walls of the nave depict biblical scenes and saints, among them St Margaret, the patron saint of the original mother parish church.

The building was easily adapted for Orthodox worship. The Royal (central) Doors of the icon screen in front of the altar were rescued from the chapel of the Russian embassy in London after the revolution of 1917. The icons on the screen were painted at various times by three students of the celebrated Russian iconographer Leonid Ouspensky. Many of the other icons around the cathedral are the gifts of families.

Today the parish community is made up of people of diverse national origins, principally Russians and British. Our services are conducted in both Church Slavonic and English. We hope that you will enjoy your visit to this church.

Venue Type:

Heritage site, Sacred space

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