Northern Gallery for Contemporary Art

Install shot of exhibiton Crab Walk
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Northern Gallery for Contemporary Art presents changing exhibitions of new work by emerging and established artists from the UK and abroad, bringing key new works of art of our time to new audiences. The gallery runs a programme of talks, tours, education activities, workshops and artists residencies, providing a range of different opportunities for people to engage with the visual arts in an imaginative and inspiring way.

Venue Type:

Gallery

Opening hours

Northern Gallery for Contemporary Art is currently relocating to the University of Sunderland, where we will open a new gallery space in 2017.

Admission charges

Free

NGCA is working to create a new collection of contemporary art, in partnership with National Glass Centre, with the support of University of Sunderland, Arts Council England, Sunderland City Council and other partners.

Collection details

Architecture, Design, Fine Art, Photography, Film and Media

Exhibition details are listed below, you may need to scroll down to see them all.

John Kippin: Based on a True Story / Works 1984 - 2018

  • 30 June — 23 September 2018 *on now

Based on a True Story surveys forty years of making art in public by John Kippin, a central figure in the emergence of photography as an independent art form in the UK from the 1970s and 1980s through to the present day.

The exhibition, and the 344pp publication that accompany it, bringing together contributions from nine leading scholars and curators in the field, including the Director of The Photographers‘ Gallery, Brett Rogers. Each of the nine contributors has selected works from Kippin’s forty-year archive to provide new insights into his way of seeing the world through a lens.

Kippin’s photographic artwork has contributed to debates about the nature of post-industrial landscapes, national and regional identity, forgotten spaces, and the power of the state and commerce to reshape the world. Since the 1980s, Kippin has created billboards for public spaces that intervene in the social realm directly – countering the messages of advertising with counter-cultural propositions, and questions.

Alongside well-known works including the seminal ‘Nostalgia for the Future’ we encounter works such as ‘Hidden’, revealing the power of the state in every aspect of our lives, and every corner of the world we thought we knew. ‘Hidden’ pictures a smashed-up jet fighter plane, grounded in the middle of the country, surrounded by rolling English hills and fields. It is as though a fighter plane from Iraq or Afghanistan had alarmingly tumbled out of the sky into a pastoral field in England: as though war had come home to haunt us. ‘Hidden’ reveals that which is hidden in plain sight: that the monopoly on violence held by the state underpins all of our lives. The graphic designer Peter Saville chose ‘Hidden’ to be the cover of Suede’s album Sci-Fi Lullabies in recognition of its Englishness, its peculiar glamour, and its horror.

The exhibition includes 20 new monumental prints of work originally shot across four decades that reveal the state of the nation over the artist’s lifetime. Across the panoramic range of subjects from tourism to cold war militarism, Kippin has consistently asked: what we have become? What can we see of ourselves, as a society, and what still remains hidden?

ARTIST’S TALK

In collaboration with North-East Photography Network the artist will talk about his work on Wednesday 23 May 6:30 at the gallery.

BOOK LAUNCH

The project is accompanied by a major monograph about Kippin’s entire career published by Kerber, Berlin, with the same title. The launch of the book is Friday 29 June 6:00 – 8:00.

ARTIST’S BIOGRAPHY


John Kippin’s artwork is represented in three of the UK’s national collections of contemporary art, having recently been acquired for the Arts Council Collection in 2018, and having works in the Victoria & Albert Museum and British Council Collection. John Kippin’s career began in the early 1970s when he was a key figure in the co operative of young artists who ran 2B Butler’s Wharf at Tower Bridge. In this decade he was instrumental in presenting artists’ film, performance, and installation projects in public and gaining recognition for new media in the visual arts. In the 1980s Kippin began to receive widespread recognition for his own photographic artwork, exhibiting in public venues from the Serpentine Gallery in 1981 to the Laing Art Gallery in 1989. In the 1990s he was awarded major one-person exhibitions at venues including The Photographers’ Gallery, London and his work was acquired for the permanent collections of national institutions. He also exhibited across Europe, North America and Asia. In the 2000s he undertook research residencies at places from the military base Greenham Common to the stately home Compton Verney, and published a sequence of ground-breaking artist’s books. Since then he also exhibited bodies of work at venues from BALTIC to the Imperial War Museum. Today he is Emeritus Professor in Photography at the University of Sunderland and is chair of the visual arts organisation Locus+.

Suitable for

  • Any age
Tree against night sky

Kelly Richardson: Pillars of Dawn

  • 27 October — 2 December 2018

Artist Kelly Richardson has spent three years imagining a world at one remove from our own, working with digital imaging software to create a vision of the near future. In each of her works, we encounter millions of glistening crystals that have somehow encrusted every square inch of the planet’s surface. The artist pushes the limits of what our eyes can register, the mind can conceive of, and the most high-tech computers can calculate. Each crystal has been ‘sculpted’ in three dimensions, so that in each work, there is one crystal for every extant species on Earth. ‘Pillars of Dawn’ presents us with what seems to be the dusk of humanity ̶ the sixth great extinction ̶ where only the hardiest of trees seem to survive. These are akin to photographs outside of time: from either the Earth’s earliest days or humanity’s final hour, acting as documents of nuclear conflagration or environmental depredation.

The artist reveals the body of work across three exhibitions at opposite ends of the country. The third is presented in what The Guardian calls “the best surviving example of English baroque architecture”: Sir John Vanbrugh’s Seaton Delaval Hall. Partially destroyed by fire in 1822, and acquired by the National Trust in 2009, the central block is roofed but left bare as a half-ruin. In the breathtaking Saloon, some fifty feet wide and sixty feet high, Richardson presents a vision of what our collective future may yet hold.

Northern Gallery for Contemporary Art
c/o The National Glass Centre
Liberty Way
Sunderland
Tyne and Wear
SR6 0GL
England

Website

www.ngca.co.uk

E-mail

NGCA

ngca@sunderland.ac.uk

Alistair Robinson, Programme Director

alistair.robinson-2@sunderland.ac.uk

Kathryn Brame, Engagement & Development Manager

kathryn.brame@sunderland.ac.uk

Telephone

0191 515 5555

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
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