Learning Curve - National Archives

Learning Curve - National Archives

Website

www.learningcurve.gov.uk/

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.

The Learning Curve is a free online teaching and learning resource, following the History National Curriculum from Key Stages 2 to 5. Students can work with a wide range of historical records including documents, photos and film. They can also enjoy games and activities for thinking and learning about our past.

Venue Type:

Campaign or initiative

Opening hours

The Learning Curve is an online resource, so it's open 24 hours a day, seven days a week!

Admission charges

FREE

Resources listed here may include websites, bookable tours and workshops, books, loan boxes and more. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all.

Focus on Domesday

http://www.learningcurve.gov.uk/FocusOn/Domesday/default.htm

This Focus On tells the story behind Domesday Book. Find out how it was made and take a closer look at an extract from a page of this famous record.There are also video clips to watch and an online quiz on Domesday Book.

Creator

  • The National Archives

Publisher

  • The National Archives

Britain 1906 to 1918

This website investigates the varied life of the British people 1906 to 1918, following the broad themes of contrast, contradiction and change. There are seven sections: Liberal welfare reforms, 1906-11 achievements of the Liberal reforms; early 1900s women’s suffrage
gaining women’s suffrage;civilians and war, 1914-18
propaganda, 1914-18;review and revision

Creator

  • Ben Walsh

Publisher

  • The National Archives

British Empire

http://www.learningcurve.gov.uk/empire/default.htm

For the last 400 years Britain has played a key role in the world - mainly because of its empire. There are three sections in this exhibition that explore: the rise of the British empire; living in the empire; the end of the empire. There are case studies on the empire in Africa, Australia, North America, India and Ireland, using a wide range of sources.

Creator

  • Ben Walsh

Publisher

  • The National Archives

Focus on Film

http://www.learningcurve.gov.uk/focuson/film/

Focus on Film is a jointly funded project by The National Archives and the South East Grid for Learning. This site presents film as a historical source and considers its advantages and disadvantages as evidence for the past. Like all historical sources films must be investigated and evaluated carefully. How far do they present an accurate record of an event and how far do they reflect the views of the film-maker, or indeed, the sponsor of the film? This website has won an award for Best Digital Content in a non-core subject at the British Education Technology Show for January 2008.

Creator

  • Ben Walsh

Publisher

  • The National Archives

General Haig, the butcher of the Somme?

http://www.learningcurve.gov.uk/handson/activities/the-great-war/1-haig-iwb.htm

Is it justified to call General Haig the Butcher of the Somme? This downloadable resource for interactive whiteboards investigates evidence for and against Haig's reputation.

Queen Victoria's family photograph

http://www.learningcurve.gov.uk/snapshots/snapshot03/snapshot3.htm

Why is no one smiling in Queen Victoria's family photograph? Tasks in this snapshot encourage you to see how much evidence there is in one photo.

Shopping in the War

The Great War

http://www.learningcurve.gov.uk/greatwar/default.htm

This exhibition is designed for Key stages 3& 4. The website investigates the tragedy of the First World War, 1914-1918. It explores the causes of war and the experiences of those who fought on its battlefields and how the Great War has been commemorated. There are six sections: The Great War: conflict and controversy; Why did Britain go to war in 1914? The trench experience; Lions led by donkeys? How has the Great War been remembered? Why was it hard to make peace?

Creator

  • Ben Walsh

Publisher

  • The National Archives

The Tudors

http://www.tudorbritain.org/

This website is based around six online activities:
What was life like at the court of Henry VIII?
How did Tudor people have fun?
Was there freedom of religion in Tudor England?
What can you find out about Tudor life?
What countries did England trade with in Tudor times?
Joust!
To answer these questions and complete the activities, pupils must examine documents and objects from the Tudor period. In addition, there are supporting materials and suggestions for further activities - both online and in the classroom.

Creator

  • Christopher Culpin

Publisher

  • The National Archives & the Victoria & Albert Museum

What happened in the Fire of London 1666?

http://www.learningcurve.gov.uk/snapshots/snapshot47/snapshot47.htm

What happened in the Fire of London 1666? This online resouce uses original documents to find out about the fire and what happened afterwards.

What was it like to be an Airman in World War II? Gordon Ford's story.

http://www.learningcurve.gov.uk/snapshots/snapshot53/snapshot53.htm

This snapshot on a WWII bombing raid is based on an interview with WWII airman Gordon Ford and looks at the experiences and effects of British bombers on German cities.

Creator

  • The National Archives

Publisher

  • The National Archives
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