Nottingham Contemporary

Nottingham Contemporary
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Our building has been designed by the award winning architects Caruso St John. It has four galleries, superb education and study areas, a performance space, a café-bar and shop.

Venue Type:

Gallery, Artist studio or collective

Opening hours

Galleries
Tuesday - Friday 10am - 7pm
Bank Holidays and Saturdays 10am - 6pm
Sunday 11am - 5pm
Closed on Mondays, except Bank Holidays during exhibitions.

Admission charges

FREE

Collection details

Archives, Architecture, Fine Art, Decorative and Applied Art

Exhibition details are listed below, you may need to scroll down to see them all.
 Wayne Burrows, from 723 Variation On The Same Theme (1949 - 1982)

Wayne Burrows: Behold! The Markets Shall Erase Our History!

  • 15 January — 27 March 2016 *on now

Drawing together strands from a number of ongoing projects, including 723 Variations On The Same Theme, Eastern Bloc Songs and the archives of the fictional British artist Robert Holcombe (1923 –2003), Wayne Burrows presents a display spanning both sides of the Cold War. It takes in typographic consumer propaganda, erased partisan histories, fabricated Independent Group artworks and artefacts from the histories of popular music in Communist Poland, Hungary and Czechoslovakia.

Suitable for

  • Any age

Website

http://nottinghamcontemporary.org/art/wayne-burrows-behold-markets-shall-erase-our-history

 Bogdanka Poznanović, Akcija srce – predmet, 1970. (Detail) Marinko Sudac Collection

Monuments Should Not Be Trusted

  • 15 January — 4 March 2016 *on now

As the first UK exhibition to showcase art from the former Yugoslavia in its wider social, economic and political context, it begins with the rise of consumerism midway through Josip Broz Tito’s 37 year presidency, and ends a few years after his death in 1980. As well as film, collage, photography, sculpture and painting, the exhibition includes music videos, state commissioned TV art programmes, and gifts made by workers for the President. Yugoslavia pursued a system developed after a dispute with the Soviet Union in 1948 – “self management” within a previously state-run economy. Yugoslavia had few restrictions on travel, meaning that its citizens – and artists – were more open to outside influences than their Communist neighbours. During the 1960s artists who gathered in the newly created Student Cultural Centres in Ljubljana, Zagreb and Belgrade turned to conceptual art. They were retrospectively named the new art practice generation.

Four key themes are explored across Nottingham Contemporary’s four galleries. Public Space and the Presence of Tito reflects upon the Yugoslav people's complex emotional relationship to their President, and the resulting "self-censorship" of artists. Many of the artefacts are from the Museum of Yugoslav History in Belgrade, where Tito’s mausoleum and many thousands of objects from his personal collection are now housed. Socialism and Class Difference looks at inequality during Yugoslavia’s “golden period”. By the 1970s unemployment was a threat to its socialist ideals. Student protests and underlying ethnic tensions are also explored. Comradess Superwoman addresses the issues faced by women in Yugoslavia, where equal rights legislation coexisted with patriarchy in the private sphere. The growth of magazines, film and advertising also introduced a new role for women – the sex symbol. Utopian Consumerism and Subcultures showcases the explosion of punk and psychedelia expressed in music, video, screen-printing and collage that appropriated pop culture, often humorously. The emergence of Yugoslavia’s new wave, the country’s most definitive form of pop music, is also documented in 80s music videos and TV programmes. The title of the exhibition is taken from a work by the Yugoslav film-maker Dušan Makavejev.

Suitable for

  • Any age

Admission

Free

Website

http://nottinghamcontemporary.org/art/monuments-should-not-be-trusted

 Detail, Kobilarna Lipica, Galerija Avgust Černigoj Lipica, Slovenija / Lipica Stud Farm, Gallery of Avgust Černigoj, Slovenia

Aftermath: Student responses to Monuments Should Not Be Trusted

  • 11 — 13 March 2016

Aftermath is an annual project created by students on the MFA course at Nottingham Trent University in response to our winter exhibition. Joined this year by students from the MA in Art History at The University of Nottingham, they will respond to issues and concerns raised by the Monuments Should Not Be Trusted exhibition to create new work. They will transform their own practices into indirect forms of documentation, discussion and critique. Whilst our galleries are in changeover, the works produced will occupy spaces within the building before forming part of our archive.

Suitable for

  • Any age

Admission

Free

Website

http://nottinghamcontemporary.org/event/aftermath-student-responses-monuments-should-not-be-trusted

Simon Starling, La Source (demi-teinte), 2009 © Simon Starling, courtesy neugerriemschneider, Berlin

Simon Starling

  • 19 March — 26 June 2016

Nottingham Contemporary presents Turner Prize-winner Simon Starling’s largest exhibition in the UK to date. The exhibition will include a new artwork developed in collaboration with Nottingham Trent University, of which Starling is an alumnus and a number of Starling’s major projects, most of which have not been presented in Britain before. Industry is a motif running through the selection – from the dawn of the Industrial Revolution to China’s industrial dominance and hi-tech industries today. This exhibition will revisit the art of the aristocratic Grand Tours of the 17th and 18th centuries through Starling’s contemporary vision, featuring a collaboration with Derby Museum which will see Joseph Wright’s The Alchymist Discovering Phosphorus in Nottingham Contemporary’s galleries.

The exhibition is part of The Grand Tour season two, part of the Cultural Destinations programme.

Suitable for

  • Any age

Website

http://nottinghamcontemporary.org/

Events details are listed below. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all. For events that don't have a specific date see the 'Resources' tab above.
Families at Nottingham Contemporary

Play & Learn Explorer Packs

  • 16 January — 4 March 2016 *on now

Pick up a Play & Learn Explorer Pack from reception – they’re full of surprises to take round the galleries. Tons of fun activities will help you to enjoy our exhibitions together. Borrow one for free.

Suitable for

  • 5-6
  • 0-4
  • 7-10

Website

http://www.nottinghamcontemporary.org/explorer-packs

Families at Nottingham Contemporary

Family Weekends

  • 16 January — 4 March 2016 *on now

We've got loads of free family activities designed to inspire imaginations and help you explore our exhibitions together!

Please note - we are closed on Mondays, except Bank Holidays.

Our events are free and all ages are welcome.
11am – 3pm, just drop in. Free.

16 - 17 January: Everyday Heroes
Dress up and strike a pose to create iconic posters that celebrate the heroes in your family.

23 - 24 January: Matchbox Art
Create a collection of mini mixed-up works of art on matchboxes.

30 - 31 January: Socialist Art Factory
Work together on a family assembly line to create mass produced works of art.

6 – 7 February: Freaky Flags
Take a look at the strange flags in our exhibition then create your own using unusual materials.

February Half Term
13 - 21 February: Gifts to the Gallery
Be inspired by the curious collection of gifts in our exhibition. Create giant, extraordinary gifts to tell a story about you and the things you value.

27 - 28 February: Family Batons
Take a look at the fabulous collection of batons in our exhibition. Make your own with a secret message inside.

Suitable for

  • 0-4
  • 7-10
  • 14-15
  • 5-6
  • 11-13
  • 16-17
  • Any age
  • 18+

Website

http://nottinghamcontemporary.org/families

 OHO/Naško Križnar, Projekt 6, 1969. Marinko Sudac Collection

Gallery Walkthroughs: Monuments Should Not Be Trusted

  • 17 February 2016 6-6:45pm
  • 2 March 2016 2-2:45pm

Wed 20 January, 6pm – 6.45pm
Mala Cherga Theatre respond to the exhibition through their dance piece, If Atoms Could Tell Stories. Introduced by Dr Maja Makula, Nottingham Trent University.

Wed 3 February, 2pm – 2.45pm
Professor David Norris, The University of Nottingham, on the tensions in art and culture in Yugoslavia from the 1960s to the 1980s.

Wed 17 February, 6pm – 6.45pm
Lina Džuverovic of Reading University and curator of Monuments Should Not be Trusted on the research behind the exhibition.

Wed 2 March, 2pm – 2.45pm
Researcher and activist Toni Prug explores ideas of the Cold War that persist today.

Admission

Free

Website

http://nottinghamcontemporary.org/event/gallery-walkthroughs

 OHO/Marko Pogačnik, Rolling Stones Matchboxes. 1968. Marinko Sudac Collection

The Study Sessions: Monuments Should Not Be Trusted

  • 25 February 2016 6:30-8:30pm

Humour in former Yugoslavia
Thu 28 January
6.30pm – 8.30pm
Dr Maja Mikula of Nottingham Trent University explores popular humour in the former
Yugoslavia and other socialist countries during the Cold War period.

Mapping Yugoslavia through popular culture
Thu 11 February
6.30pm – 8.30pm
Dr Maja Mikula on the disintegration of the former Yugoslavia, including the failure of ideology to locate a shared space.

Constructing and Deconstructing Yugoslavia: The role of Youth Movements
Thu 25 February
6.30pm – 8.30pm
Olivia Hellewell and Laura Todd of The University of Nottingham look at the role of youth movements in the construction of Tito's Yugoslavia.

Admission

Free

Website

http://nottinghamcontemporary.org/event/study-sessions-constructing-and-deconstructing-yugoslavia

Families at Nottingham Contemporary

February Half Term Family Fun

  • 13 — 21 February 2016

Gifts at the Gallery

Be inspired by the curious collection of gifts in our exhibition Monuments Should Not Be Trusted. Create strange and extraordinary gifts to tell a story about you and the people and things you admire.

Closed on Mondays except Bank Holidays.

11am - 3pm

Free

Suitable for

  • 5-6
  • 11-13
  • Any age
  • 14-15
  • 18+
  • 7-10
  • 0-4
  • 16-17

Website

http://Families at Nottingham Contemporary

 Skupljači perja (I Even Met Happy Gypsies) by Aleksandar Petrović. Film Still

Black Wave Cinema Night

  • 16 February 2016 6:30-8:30pm

A film night dedicated to the Yugoslav Black Wave Movement of the 60s and 70s.

Screening of Skupljači perja (I Even Met Happy Gypsies) directed by Serbian director Aleksandar Petrović in 1967. The film will be introduced by film critic Vlastimir Sudar.

Vlastimir Sudar is a film critic and professor of film history and theory at University of the Arts London. He is the author of the book A Portrait of the Artist as a Political Dissident: The Life and Work of Aleksandar Petrovic. Intellect, Bristol, 2013.

Suitable for

  • Any age

Admission

Free

Website

http://nottinghamcontemporary.org/event/black-wave-cinema-night

London Sinfonietta

London Sinfonietta - Masters of Minimalism

  • 2 March 2016 9-11:30pm

Less is definitely more in this evening of classic minimalism, performed by the world renowned London Sinfonietta. Setting the scene with Steve Reich’s brilliantly simple demonstration of what happens when two musicians start to clap out of sync. Includes works composed by ArvoPärt, Philip Glass, Laurence Crane, Michael Torke and Michael Nyman. An After Hours event presented in partnership with Theatre Royal & Royal Concert Hall, Nottingham and Orchestras Live. Book online or through the Theatre Royal.

Suitable for

  • Any age

Admission

£17.50 advance

Website

http://nottinghamcontemporary.org/event/london-sinfonietta-%E2%80%93-masters-minimalism

 DITA Movie film still.

Unbribable Life. Art and Activism in former Yugoslavia and the UK

  • 3 March 2016 3-5pm, 6:30-8:30pm

Artist Margareta Kern and activist DamirArsenijevic host an event on contemporary labour struggles in the former Yugoslavia, discussing new forms of direct democracy, like the Citizen's Plenum that emerged out of protests in Bosnia-Herzegovina in 2014, in relation to worker movements there and in the UK and Nottingham in particular.

In 2015 workers at the DITA Factory in Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina, occupied and took control of a factory inactive due to bankruptcy and corruption since 2012. Drawing from the force of the plenums (public encounters for resisting state corruption held in Tuzla’s national gallery) workers have the factory up and running and are joined by activists, artists and researchers in founding a Worker’s University within the factory walls. How do the ideals of self-managed socialism find themselves in recent movements which contest the global webs of debt and corruption on a global scale? How do these relate to histories of worker struggle in the Midlands and how they are being reconfigured, particularly when they are increasingly reliant on the so-called ‘knowledge economy’?


Workshop 3pm – 5pm
Public Event 6.30pm – 8.30pm

Suitable for

  • Any age

Admission

Free

Website

http://nottinghamcontemporary.org/event/unbribable-life-art-and-activism-former-yugoslavia-and-uk

 Želimir Žilnik, June Movements, b/w documentary film, 35 mm. Film Still

Unbribable Life II: The Politics of the Art School Study Day

  • 4 March 2016 1-6pm

An event bringing together researchers and participants from the student art centres in Yugoslavia with those involved in art school occupations in the UK past and present.
Travel bursaries available for current students involved in art schools. Please write to publicprogramme@nottinghamcontemporary.org with your interest in attending.
In collaboration with Politicised Practice Research Group and Anarchist Research Group, Loughborough University.

Suitable for

  • Any age

Admission

Free

Website

http://nottinghamcontemporary.org/event/unbribable-life-ii-art-and-activism-former-yugoslavia-and-uk

Resources listed here may include websites, bookable tours and workshops, books, loan boxes and more. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all.

Young People's Programme

http://www.nottinghamcontemporary.org/education2/future/

Starting in January 2009 Nottingham Contemporary will be running a course for young people aged between 13 and 23 to help them act as arts instigators. They will be trained to design, co-ordinate and deliver a programme of activity for other young people. It will also give them an opportunity to take part in the Arts Council’s arts award scheme.

How to obtain

For more information contact info@nottinghamcontemporary.org

Nottingham Contemporary
Weekday Cross
Nottingham
Nottinghamshire
NG1 2GB
England

Website

www.nottinghamcontemporary.org

E-mail

info@nottinghamcontemporary.org

Telephone

0115 948 9750

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
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