The Wiener Library

Guided tours icon Library icon Study area icon

The Wiener Library for the Study of the Holocaust & Genocide is one of the world's leading and most extensive archives on the Holocaust and Nazi era. The Library's unique collection of over one million items includes published and unpublished works, press cuttings, photographs and eyewitness testimony. It provides a resource to oppose anti-Semitism and other forms of prejudice and racism.

Venue Type:

Library, Archive, Museum

Opening hours

Monday to Friday 10.00-17.00
Tuesday 10.00-19.30

Closed: Bank Holidays
First day of Rosh Hashanah
First day of Yom Kippur
Christmas & New Year

Admission charges

Free entry to the public.
Photo ID and proof of address/letter of introduction required on first visit.
Only Members or Friends of the Library are permitted to borrow books.

Getting there

By tube:
• Russell Square (Piccadilly line)
• Goodge Street (Northern line)
• St Pancras International (Metropolitan, Northern, Circle, Victoria and Hammersmith & City lines)

By bus:
The following buses stop nearby:
7, 59, 68, X68, 91, 168, 188

Access:
In 2011 the Library moved to new premises in a historic location in Russell Square.
• There is a disabled lift outside of the building, and once inside the building, all floors are accessible via the indoor lift.
• There are adapted toilets on the basement level.
• The nearest step-free underground station is King’s Cross, St Pancras.

The Wiener Library collects material related to the Holocaust, its causes and legacies. The Library has holdings of approx 65,000 items searchable online including books, pamphlets, periodicals and documents. The collection includes rare eye-witness accounts and an extensive press cuttings archive. The Library holds a photo archive of over 10,000 images, in the process of being digitised and made accessible through the website. Up to one third of the collection contains pre-war material and the Library continues to add to its collections.

Collection details

Archives, Photography, Religion, Social History, World Cultures

Events details are listed below. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all. For events that don't have a specific date see the 'Resources' tab above.
Text saying Unit 731

Film Screening: Unit 731 – Did Emperor Hirohito Know?

  • 31 May 2017 6:30-8pm

With introduction by film maker Peter Williams

Among the worst of the many atrocities committed during World War II were the germ warfare experiments by Japanese doctors. The history of germ warfare unit, code-named Unit 731, was for half a century shrouded in mystery. Set up in 1935 by brilliant bacteriologist, Shiro Ishii, in a remote, high-security headquarters in a village in Japanese-occupied Manchuria, the unit was where Japanese soldier-scientists carried out freezing, ballistics and other experiments on Russian, Chinese, American, British and Australian prisoners. Ishii’s aim was to make a biological weapon that would win the war for Japan. But, unlike his Nazi counterpart, Josef Mengele, Ishii had no reason to take refuge in the jungles of South America at the end of the War. For he and his colleagues pulled off the most incredible deal with their erstwhile enemies.

Unit 731 – Did Emperor Hirohito Know? charts the top-level deal under which Unit 731’s unique research data was secretly traded to the Americans in return for wartime immunity for the perpetrators.

Suitable for

  • 18+

Admission

Reserve your free tickets via The Wiener Library website

Website

http://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/Whats-On?item=320

Photograph showing two boys after liberation

Lecture: Children as Victims of Medical Experiments in Concentration Camps

  • 6 June 2017 6:30-6pm

Experiments with concentration camp prisoners began immediately after the beginning of the war in autumn. In the last two years of the war, even children were misused by Nazi doctors for medical experiments in the camps: The geneticist Dr. Josef Mengele, who was the camp physician in Auschwitz from May 1943, carried out genetic research on children twins. The immunologist Dr. Arnold Dohmen undertook hepatitis experiments on Jewish boys in Sachsenhausen from September 1944. The lung doctor Dr. Kurt Heißmeyer in January 1945 infected Jewish children in Neuengamme for test purposes with tuberculosis pathogens.

Astrid Ley's talk addresses the question: why were experiments made on children in concentration camps? Where these experiments just the apex of morally uninhibited research in the "Third Reich," or were there other reasons as well?

Dr. Astrid Ley is a historian and a historian of medicine. She is working as deputy head of the Sachsenhausen Concentration Camp Memorial near Berlin. Her main research interest is medicine under National Socialism and, in particular, medical crimes and medical care in concentration camps. She will be in residence at the Wiener Library as an EHRI Fellow in June 2017, focusing on the moral dilemmas faced by inmate physicians.

Suitable for

  • 18+

Admission

Reserve your free tickets via The Wiener Library website

Website

http://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/Whats-On?item=322

photograph showing cover of Tusan's latest book "The British Empire and the Armenian Genocide: Humanitarianism and Imperial Politics from Gladstone to Churchill"

The British Empire and the Armenian Genocide

  • 14 June 2017 6:30-8pm

This talk explores the British Empire’s response to the 1915 Armenian genocide in which an estimated one million Armenians were killed. A leading power in the region and the world at the time, Britain and its Empire played a key role in determining the global response to these events as they unfolded in the Ottoman Empire. Newly uncovered archival material on imperial policy dating back to the nineteenth century and war crimes trials held after WWI to punish perpetrators show why it proved impossible to stop the violence and prosecute those responsible for the atrocities despite the emergence at the time of the category of ‘crimes against humanity’ and one of the first ever international humanitarian campaigns. From Gladstonian idealism to Churchill’s imperial realpolitik, the British response to the Armenian genocide reveals the high stakes and legacies of the failure of a global hegemonic power to lead the prosecution of the architects of one of the classic cases of genocide in the modern period.

Admission

Free admission but registration via The Wiener Library website essential

Website

http://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/Whats-On?item=326

Image featuring title of the film and picture of Eva Mozes Kor who features in the film

Film Screening: Forgiving Dr Mengele

  • 26 June 2017 6-8pm

Forgiving Dr. Mengele is a documentary film about Eva Mozes Kor, a survivor of the Holocaust, and Dr. Josef Mengele and his staff, who experimented on her and her twin sister Miriam Mozes, as well as approximately 1,400 other twin pairs, in Auschwitz-Birkenau. The documentary was directed by Bob Hercules and Cheri Pugh, who also served as producers. They followed Eva for over four years, chronicling her story and her journey to Israel.

The film screening will be introduced by Professor Dan Stone, who is Professor of Modern History and Director of the Holocaust Research Institute at Royal Holloway, University of London.

Admission

Admission free but registration via The Wiener Library website essential

Website

http://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/Whats-On?item=323

Resources listed here may include websites, bookable tours and workshops, books, loan boxes and more. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all.

Online Learning Materials

http://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/wls.aspx

A selection of the Wiener Library's unique stories and materials are now remotely accessible to anyone who wishes to learn more about the Holocaust and the Nazi era. The site allows users to trace different topics interactively, as well as providing background information on connected themes. The materials currently include detailed information on 'Childhood under the Swastika', 'Helping the Survivors' and the fascinating story of German-Jewish factory owner Ludwig Neumann.

Creator

  • The Wiener Library

How to obtain

The Wiener Library Learning Materials are freely accessible to everyone via the Wiener Library website.

Getting there

By tube:
• Russell Square (Piccadilly line)
• Goodge Street (Northern line)
• St Pancras International (Metropolitan, Northern, Circle, Victoria and Hammersmith & City lines)

By bus:
The following buses stop nearby:
7, 59, 68, X68, 91, 168, 188

Access:
In 2011 the Library moved to new premises in a historic location in Russell Square.
• There is a disabled lift outside of the building, and once inside the building, all floors are accessible via the indoor lift.
• There are adapted toilets on the basement level.
• The nearest step-free underground station is King’s Cross, St Pancras.

The Wiener Library
29 Russell Square
London
Greater London
WC1B 5DP
England

Website

www.wienerlibrary.co.uk

E-mail

info@wienerlibrary.co.uk

Telephone

020 7636 7247

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
advertisement