The Wiener Library

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The Wiener Library for the Study of the Holocaust & Genocide is one of the world's leading and most extensive archives on the Holocaust and Nazi era. The Library's unique collection of over one million items includes published and unpublished works, press cuttings, photographs and eyewitness testimony. It provides a resource to oppose anti-Semitism and other forms of prejudice and racism.

Venue Type:

Library, Archive, Museum

Opening hours

Monday to Friday 10.00-17.00
Tuesday 10.00-19.30

Closed: Bank Holidays
First day of Rosh Hashanah
First day of Yom Kippur
Christmas & New Year

Admission charges

Free entry to the public.
Photo ID and proof of address/letter of introduction required on first visit.
Only Members or Friends of the Library are permitted to borrow books.

Getting there

By tube:
•Russell Square (Piccadilly line)
•Goodge Street (Northern line)
•St Pancras International (Metropolitan, Northern, Circle, Victoria and Hammersmith & City lines)

By bus:
The following buses stop nearby:
7, 59, 68, X68, 91, 168, 188

Access:
We have recently moved to new premises in a historic location on Russell Square. At this time, access for some disabled people is limited and we encourage visitors to contact us in advance if they are concerned about access.
•The ground floor exhibition area is accessible only by a flight of five steps. We will be installing step-free access in Spring 2012. Once inside the building, all areas are accessible to wheelchairs via the lift.
•There are adapted toilets on the basement level.
•The nearest step-free underground station is King’s Cross, St Pancras.

The Wiener Library collects material related to the Holocaust, its causes and legacies. The Library has holdings of approx 65,000 items searchable online including books, pamphlets, periodicals and documents. The collection includes rare eye-witness accounts and an extensive press cuttings archive. The Library holds a photo archive of over 10,000 images, in the process of being digitised and made accessible through the website. Up to one third of the collection contains pre-war material and the Library continues to add to its collections.

Collection details

Archives, Photography, Religion, Social History, World Cultures

Exhibition details are listed below, you may need to scroll down to see them all.
Finding Treblinka

Finding Treblinka

  • 16 August — 15 September 2016 *on now

The Wiener Library’s current temporary exhibition explores the Nazi labour and extermination camps of Treblinka using the ground-breaking research of Staffordshire University archaeologist Dr Caroline Sturdy Colls and in artistic responses to the topic curated by Michael Branthwaite.

Between 800,000 and 1 million Jews, Poles and Roma from across Europe were killed during the Holocaust in the Nazi labour and extermination camps at Treblinka. Yet, the history of both camps is not well known. Few are aware of the scale of the killings that took place at the sites or the complexity and diversity of the camps’ architecture. The very few survivors and the almost total destruction of the camp by the Nazis have left a scant historical record.

Since 2007, a team of forensic archaeologists, led by Dr Caroline Sturdy Colls, have investigated the sites of both the former Treblinka extermination and labour camps. Through the team’s unique, predominantly non-invasive approach, a more accurate picture of the camps has emerged. At the same time, religious and ethical considerations surrounding their investigation have been respected. This work allowed the old gas chambers, mass graves and a large number of objects to be located. Sturdy Colls’ forensic archaeological research is therefore one of the best ways to reconstruct the events that occurred at Treblinka.

Now, for the first time in the UK, this archaeological work has been adapted and displayed at the Wiener Library, in cooperation with Caroline Sturdy Colls and Michael Branthwaite. The exhibition features specially commissioned artworks by Michael Branthwaite, Janine Goldsworthy, Dave Griffiths, Hilary Jack and Jenny Steele.

Website

http://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/Finding_Treblinka

Events details are listed below. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all. For events that don't have a specific date see the 'Resources' tab above.
Portraits and Memories

Project Talk: Portraits and Memories

  • 5 September 2016 6:30-8pm

Portraits and memories is an ongoing and expanding exhibition and education program launched by the Federation of Jewish Communities in Serbia (FJCS) that portrays the Jewish Community of Serbia and the wider territory of ex-Yugoslavia before the Holocaust. The exhibition explores and shows one part of a newly established digital archive of pre-Holocaust era photographs and recorded testimonies of Holocaust survivors of the Jewish Community in Serbia. The digital archive currently holds a collection of more than 6,000 digitalized private and family photographs and around 280 recorded testimonies in an audio-video and textual formats. Therefore, the exhibition can be viewed as wider historical, cultural, social and technological progression through the everyday life of a society at the beginning of the 20th century.

Following a brief history of photography at the first half of the 20th century, the exhibition opens up a dialogue on the ways in which personal histories, memory and photography tell a story that are testaments to humanity. The exhibition also explores private photographs which were taken during the Holocaust by families who went into hiding in their home country or as tourists abroad. These photographs, often made as snapshots or holiday photos - landscape or cityscape shots, increase in contrast when we know the context of the image.

For further information about this project:
https://vimeo.com/129824379
https://vimeo.com/122359711

Andrea Palašti is a visual artist, independent curator and lecturer, based in Novi Sad, Serbia. Andrea holds a master’s degree in Photography at the Academy of Art, University of Novi Sad. In 2015, she graduated with a PhD in Art and media theory from the University of Arts in Belgrade. She is active in the field of research and exhibition practice that experiments with archives, methodologies and contextual aspects of art, which emphasizes issues of cultural geography and the everyday life. She has recently been appointed as a Lecturer in Visual communications of the Department for New media at the Academy of Art in Novi Sad, Serbia.

Dr Palašti will be in residence at the Wiener Library as an EHRI Fellow in late August and September 2016.
www.andreapalasti.com

Admission

Admission is free but booking is advised as space is limited

Website

http://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/Whats-On?item=269

Adam Gorb

A Lecture on the Music of Theresienstadt by Professor Adam Gorb

  • 8 September 2016 6:30-8pm

A lecture at the Wiener Library by eminent composer and scholar Professor Adam Gorb of the Royal Northern College of Music in Manchester on the subject of the music scene at Theresienstadt concentration camp. The work of composers such as Viktor Ullmann, Hans Krasa, Gideon Klein and Pavel Haas will be considered. An original copy of the libretto (by Peter Kien) of Viktor Ullmann’s opera composed in Theresienstadt, The Emperor of Atlantis, is held in the library’s collections.

Admission

Admission is free but booking is essential as space is limited

Website

http://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/Whats-On?item=267

Dr Patrick Houlihan

Fraenkel Prize Lecture: Hello to All That: Catholicism in Germany and Austria-Hungary during the First World War

  • 14 September 2016 6:30-8pm

Offering a more nuanced approach to religious belief during the Great War, Patrick J. Houlihan's talk shares research from his book analyzing the lived religion of everyday Catholic belief beyond stark dichotomies. Houlihan's book, Catholicism and the Great War, which received the Fraenkel Prize in 2015, illuminates the spectrum of belief and unbelief during the Great War, thus revising master narratives of secularization and modernism that dominate the First World War’s cultural history. This book highlights the comparative relevance for the trajectories of Central Europe's Protestants, Catholics, and Jews into the cataclysm of the Second World War and the Holocaust.

Dr. Patrick J. Houlihan is Research Fellow in History at the University of Oxford. He received his PhD in History from the University of Chicago in 2011. Since 2016, he is a member of Oxford's "Globalising and Localising the Great War" project, particularly its focus on Global Religions, which has received major multi-year funding from the Arts and Humanities Research Council of the United Kingdom. His publications include Catholicism and the Great War: Religion and Everyday Life in Germany and Austria-Hungary, 1914-1922 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015), the manuscript of which was awarded in 2015 the Fraenkel Prize in Contemporary History from the Wiener Library.

Admission

Admission is free but booking is advised as space is limited

Website

http://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/Whats-On?item=271

Resources listed here may include websites, bookable tours and workshops, books, loan boxes and more. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all.

Online Learning Materials

http://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/wls.aspx

A selection of the Wiener Library's unique stories and materials are now remotely accessible to anyone who wishes to learn more about the Holocaust and the Nazi era. The site allows users to trace different topics interactively, as well as providing background information on connected themes. The materials currently include detailed information on 'Childhood under the Swastika', 'Helping the Survivors' and the fascinating story of German-Jewish factory owner Ludwig Neumann.

Creator

  • The Wiener Library

How to obtain

The Wiener Library Learning Materials are freely accessible to everyone via the Wiener Library website.

Getting there

By tube:
•Russell Square (Piccadilly line)
•Goodge Street (Northern line)
•St Pancras International (Metropolitan, Northern, Circle, Victoria and Hammersmith & City lines)

By bus:
The following buses stop nearby:
7, 59, 68, X68, 91, 168, 188

Access:
We have recently moved to new premises in a historic location on Russell Square. At this time, access for some disabled people is limited and we encourage visitors to contact us in advance if they are concerned about access.
•The ground floor exhibition area is accessible only by a flight of five steps. We will be installing step-free access in Spring 2012. Once inside the building, all areas are accessible to wheelchairs via the lift.
•There are adapted toilets on the basement level.
•The nearest step-free underground station is King’s Cross, St Pancras.

The Wiener Library
29 Russell Square
London
Greater London
WC1B 5DP
England

Website

www.wienerlibrary.co.uk

E-mail

info@wienerlibrary.co.uk

Telephone

020 7636 7247

Fax

020 7436 6428

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
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