The Wiener Library

The Wiener Library
29 Russell Square
London
Greater London
WC1B 5DP
England

Website

www.wienerlibrary.co.uk

E-mail

info@wienerlibrary.co.uk

Telephone

020 7636 7247

Fax

020 7436 6428

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
Guided tours icon Library icon Study area icon

The Wiener Library for the Study of the Holocaust & Genocide is one of the world's leading and most extensive archives on the Holocaust and Nazi era. The Library's unique collection of over one million items includes published and unpublished works, press cuttings, photographs and eyewitness testimony. It provides a resource to oppose anti-Semitism and other forms of prejudice and racism.

Venue Type:

Library, Archive, Museum

Opening hours

Monday to Friday 10.00-17.00
Tuesday 10.00-19.30

Closed: Bank Holidays
First day of Rosh Hashanah
First day of Yom Kippur
Christmas & New Year

Admission charges

Free entry to the public.
Photo ID and proof of address/letter of introduction required on first visit.
Only Members or Friends of the Library are permitted to borrow books.

Getting there

By tube:
•Russell Square (Piccadilly line)
•Goodge Street (Northern line)
•St Pancras International (Metropolitan, Northern, Circle, Victoria and Hammersmith & City lines)

By bus:
The following buses stop nearby:
7, 59, 68, X68, 91, 168, 188

Access:
We have recently moved to new premises in a historic location on Russell Square. At this time, access for some disabled people is limited and we encourage visitors to contact us in advance if they are concerned about access.
•The ground floor exhibition area is accessible only by a flight of five steps. We will be installing step-free access in Spring 2012. Once inside the building, all areas are accessible to wheelchairs via the lift.
•There are adapted toilets on the basement level.
•The nearest step-free underground station is King’s Cross, St Pancras.

The Wiener Library collects material related to the Holocaust, its causes and legacies. The Library has holdings of approx 65,000 items searchable online including books, pamphlets, periodicals and documents. The collection includes rare eye-witness accounts and an extensive press cuttings archive. The Library holds a photo archive of over 10,000 images, in the process of being digitised and made accessible through the website. Up to one third of the collection contains pre-war material and the Library continues to add to its collections.

Collection details

Archives, Photography, Religion, Social History, World Cultures

Events details are listed below. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all. For events that don't have a specific date see the 'Resources' tab above.
rwandan football team

Film Screening: Football Rwanda, Fields of Memories (2014)

  • 23 April 2014 6:30-8pm

The Wiener Library is delighted to be hosting one of the first UK screenings of the 2014 documentary film ‘Football Rwanda, Fields of Memories’, directed by Francois Xavier-Destors. The film tells the history of Rwanda through sports. It explains the different steps that led to the genocide, with the aim of relating a story that too many people still ignore. It's a project which has been put together for the past three years in collaboration with Dream Team Football Academy and FHPU project, and many other youth led football groups all around Rwanda. The film has given a platform to many former football players to speak about how football created acts of solidarity throughout the country's history; the film raises the question of a possible reconstruction of Rwandan society through football.
Survivor Eric Murangwa and founder of FHPU Project, along with the film’s director Marie Thomas-Penette will introduce the film.

Suitable for

  • 18+

Admission

free but booking essential as space is limited

Website

http://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/Whats-On?item=134

Hitler inspecting transport train

Hero or War Criminal? Regent Horthy and the Destruction of Hungarian Jews

  • 24 April 2014 6:30-8pm

Two-thirds of the Hungarian Jewish community was murdered between 1941 and 1945. Every tenth victim of the Holocaust was Hungarian, and every third victim of Auschwitz-Birkenau was deported from Hungary. In today's Hungary, the role of head of state Miklós Horthy in the plunder and deportation of hundreds of thousands of people is the focus of current debates over the memory of the Holocaust. What was Horthy’s responsibility? What options did he have? Moreover, why is the assessment of Horthy's role still so divisive in the 21st century? This presentation by Dr Gábor Kádár will attempt to answer these questions.

Dr Kádár has been conducting historical research and has been participating in digital humanities projects for 15 years.

Suitable for

  • 18+

Admission

free but booking essential as space is limited

Website

http://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/Whats-On?item=129

Rwanda

The Legacy of the 1994 Rwandan Genocide: an evening of testimony and reflection.

  • 1 May 2014 6:30-8pm

The Wiener Library is hosting a special evening to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the Rwandan genocide. The event also marks the donation of a collection of audio testimonies from Rwandan refugees living in the UK today, which were collected by the charity rYico as part of a year long project. The testimonies are the very first addition to the collection from the Rwandan Genocide.

We are delighted to welcome the following speakers at the event:

Dan Godshaw, project director at rYico, will speak about the project ‘Keeping Memories’ and the work that rYico does in Rwanda today.

Patrice Shema (Chairperson of London Rwandese Community Association) and Bosco Ngabonzima (Chairperson of West Midlands Rwandan Community Association), both survivors of the Rwandan genocide will speak about their experiences and their involvement with rYico’s project.

Dr Phil Clark from SOAS will speak about post-conflict resolution in Rwanda today, drawing on research from his most recent book ‘The Gacaca Courts, Post-Genocide Justice and Reconciliation in Rwanda: Justice without Lawyers’ (Cambridge University Press).

Suitable for

  • 18+

Admission

free but booking essential as space is limited

Website

http://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/Whats-On?item=132

Armenian genocide

“Marks Hard To Erase”: The Rescue and Repatriation of “Absorbed” Armenian Women Survivors, 1919-1927

  • 2 May 2014 From 1pm

During the Armenian genocide of 1915, many thousands of women and children were kidnapped or sold from the deportation columns into Turkish, Kurdish, or Arab households, where they lived as wives, servants, or concubines. After the Armistice, various humanitarian organisations, including the American charity Near East Relief and the League of Nations, set about reclaiming these Christian women and children from Moslem homes as part of the relief work, and reintegrating them into the Armenian community. A very specific group within these survivors were women whose faces and hands had been tattooed according to Bedouin custom, a rite of passage which also denoted tribal and familial possession. Unlike the children, who were more easily reabsorbed into the community (and a staple of philanthropic giving), these women bore on their skin visible, permanent reminders of their ‘defilement’ by non-Christian men, which was of course a major taboo among Armenians and a source of much horror for Americans and Europeans. This paper focuses on the reactions and responses of the relief workers to those who had been tattooed, and how their experiences were articulated in the relief fundraising campaigns ‘back home’ – both discursively and in photographs. The plight of these women goes to the heart of the rescuers’ dilemma: on the one hand they wanted to restore them to the Armenian ‘nation’, but on the other, what was seen as their visible contamination made that a problematic and perhaps impossible goal.

Suitable for

  • 18+

Admission

Free but booking is essential as space is limited

Website

http://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/Whats-On?item=118

new justice

The Birth of the New Justice

  • 7 May 2014 6:30-8pm

This presentation from Mark Lewis will discuss his prizewinning book, The Birth of the New Justice, a history of international criminal courts and new international criminal laws from the end of World War I to the beginning of the Cold War. The purpose of these courts was to repress aggressive war, war crimes, terrorism, and genocide. Rather than arguing that these legal projects were attempts by state governments to project a "liberal legalism" and create an international state system that limited sovereignty, Mark Lewis shows that European jurists in a variety of transnational organizations derived their motives from a range of ideological motives - liberal, conservative, utopian, humanitarian, nationalist, and particularist.

Mark Lewis is the winner of the 2013 Fraenkel Prize in Contemporary History Category A for The Birth of the New Justice: The Internationalisation of Crime and Punishment 1919-1950 (Oxford University Press, 2014).

Suitable for

  • 18+

Admission

free but booking essential as space is limited

Website

http://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/Whats-On?item=133

Exiled poles

The Exiled Nation: London Poles during the Second World War

  • 14 May 2014 7-8:30pm

The Wiener Library is pleased to be hosting an interactive workshop exploring the history of the Polish community in London during the Second World War as part of the History and Heritage Adult Learning London Network 2014 event series ‘London at War’.

The invasion of Poland in 1939 marked the beginning of a humanitarian catastrophe on a previously unimagined scale. Almost a quarter of the Polish population perished at the hands of the Nazis and Soviet occupiers between 1939 and 1945, a tragedy that included the extermination of almost the entire population of Polish Jews in the Holocaust.

In 1940, London became a refuge for the Polish Government, its National Council and approximately 23,000 soldiers of the Polish Forces. Those who stayed behind formed an armed underground resistance, among them the organisation 'Zegota', whose aim was to help the plight of the Polish Jews.

The Wiener Library invite you to explore original documents with Ela Kaczmarska , an experienced workshop leader from The National Archives.

Suitable for

  • 18+

Admission

Free but booking is essential as space is limited.

Website

http://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/Whats-On?item=125

Museums at night

Secrets of the Wiener Library tour

  • 15 May 2014 6-7pm

The Wiener Library is excited to be taking part in the Museums at Night campaign for the first time. We’re offering an out of hours, free behind-the-scenes tour of the Wiener Library’s exhibition ‘4000 Lives: The Kitchener Camp Rescue’, the basement archives and the Wolfson Reading Room. Discover an anti-Nazi pamphlet disguised as a tea packet, secret diaries from Theresienstadt, a 1936 antisemitic board game and much more. The tour will be followed by light refreshments and a Q&A with Library staff.

Suitable for

  • 18+
  • 16-17

Admission

Free but booking essential as spaces are limited

Website

http://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/Whats-On?item=122

Wiener Library archives

Museums at Night Tour

  • 15 May 2014 6-7:30pm

The Wiener Library is excited to be taking part in the Museums at Night campaign for the first time. We’re offering an out of hours, free behind-the-scenes tour of the Wiener Library’s exhibition ‘4000 Lives: The Kitchener Camp Rescue’, the basement archives and the Wolfson Reading Room. Discover an anti-Nazi pamphlet disguised as a tea packet, secret diaries from Theresienstadt, a 1936 antisemitic board game and much more. The tour will be followed by light refreshments and a Q&A with Library staff.

Suitable for

  • 14-15
  • 16-17
  • 18+

Admission

Free

Website

http://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/whatson

Throguh a Child's Eyes

Through a Child's Eyes: Holocaust Literature for Young People

  • 5 June 2014 4-7:30pm

Organised in association with Facing History and Ourselves, this workshop presents an exciting opportunity for educators to investigate Holocaust literature written from a child's perspective and to discuss its use in the classroom. Attendees will receive effective resources and guidance on how to teach this important subject. The workshop will include two sessions focusing on how literature can illuminate aspects of the Holocaust, and in addition there will be a tour of the Wiener Library’s special collection of children’s books. There will be time to reflect on the principles that underpin the use of Holocaust literature, especially that written by and for young people.

The workshop will be of particular interest to teachers of English, History, RE, Citizenship and Philosophy for Children. Advice will also be available about how the Wiener Library can be useful more generally to your work, and how Facing History and Ourselves can help your professional development.

Refreshments will be served during the afternoon. Places limited to 15 on a first come first served basis,

Please note: This workshop was originally scheduled to take place in February but had to be postponed due to unforeseen circumstances. Thanks to the generous support of Facing History an admission fee is no longer required

Suitable for

  • 18+

Admission

Thanks to the generous support of Facing History an admission fee is no longer required. Please register on our website's 'Whats on' page.

Website

http://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/Whats-On?item=113

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

The Holocaust in Eastern Europe in the Records of the International Tracing Service Digital Archive

  • 28 July — 1 August 2014

The Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies, US Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM) and The Wiener Library are pleased to invite applications for the international research workshop, "The Holocaust in Eastern Europe in the Records of the International Tracing Service Digital Archive," scheduled for 28 July - 1 August 2014. The workshop will take place at the USHMM in Washington DC.

This international workshop seeks to provide scholars specialising in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union during and after World War II new opportunities to research within the International Tracing Service (ITS) digital collections, the largest archive of Holocaust and World War II-era documentation only recently opened for research. Applications are welcome from scholars in all relevant academic disciplines, including history, political science, literature, Jewish studies, psychology, sociology, geography and others.

Applications from scholars based in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union are especially encouraged.

Please direct enquiries to:

Dr Christine Schmidt
International Tracing Service Archive Researcher
The Wiener Library for the Study of the Holocaust & Genocide
29 Russell Square
London WC1B 5DP
Fax: +44 (0) 20 7436 6428
E-mail: cschmidt@wienerlibrary.co.uk

Website

http://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/domains/wienerlibrary.co.uk/local/media/downloads/Call_for_Applications_2014_ITS_Workshop_with_Wiener_Library_FINAL_3.pdf

Resources listed here may include websites, bookable tours and workshops, books, loan boxes and more. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all.

Online Learning Materials

http://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/wls.aspx

A selection of the Wiener Library's unique stories and materials are now remotely accessible to anyone who wishes to learn more about the Holocaust and the Nazi era. The site allows users to trace different topics interactively, as well as providing background information on connected themes. The materials currently include detailed information on 'Childhood under the Swastika', 'Helping the Survivors' and the fascinating story of German-Jewish factory owner Ludwig Neumann.

Creator

  • The Wiener Library

How to obtain

The Wiener Library Learning Materials are freely accessible to everyone via the Wiener Library website.

Getting there

By tube:
•Russell Square (Piccadilly line)
•Goodge Street (Northern line)
•St Pancras International (Metropolitan, Northern, Circle, Victoria and Hammersmith & City lines)

By bus:
The following buses stop nearby:
7, 59, 68, X68, 91, 168, 188

Access:
We have recently moved to new premises in a historic location on Russell Square. At this time, access for some disabled people is limited and we encourage visitors to contact us in advance if they are concerned about access.
•The ground floor exhibition area is accessible only by a flight of five steps. We will be installing step-free access in Spring 2012. Once inside the building, all areas are accessible to wheelchairs via the lift.
•There are adapted toilets on the basement level.
•The nearest step-free underground station is King’s Cross, St Pancras.

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