The Wiener Library

Photograph of the Reading Room in the Library
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The Wiener Library for the Study of the Holocaust & Genocide is one of the world's leading and most extensive archives on the Holocaust and Nazi era. The Library's unique collection of over one million items includes published and unpublished works, press cuttings, photographs and eyewitness testimony. It provides a resource to oppose antisemitism and other forms of prejudice and racism.

Venue Type:

Library, Archive, Museum

Opening hours

Monday to Friday 10.00-17.00
Tuesday 10.00-19.30

Closed: Bank Holidays
First day of Rosh Hashanah
First day of Yom Kippur
Christmas & New Year

Admission charges

Free entry to the public.
Photo ID and proof of address/letter of introduction required on first visit.
Only Members or Friends of the Library are permitted to borrow books.

Getting there

By tube:
• Russell Square (Piccadilly line)
• Goodge Street (Northern line)
• St Pancras International (Metropolitan, Northern, Circle, Victoria and Hammersmith & City lines)

By bus:
The following buses stop nearby:
7, 59, 68, X68, 91, 168, 188

Access:
In 2011 the Library moved to new premises in a historic location in Russell Square.
• There is a disabled lift outside of the building, and once inside the building, all floors are accessible via the indoor lift.
• There are adapted toilets on the basement level.
• The nearest step-free underground station is King’s Cross, St Pancras.

The Wiener Library collects material related to the Holocaust, its causes and legacies. The Library has holdings of approx 65,000 items searchable online including books, pamphlets, periodicals and documents. The collection includes rare eye-witness accounts and an extensive press cuttings archive. The Library holds a photo archive of over 10,000 images, in the process of being digitised and made accessible through the website. Up to one third of the collection contains pre-war material and the Library continues to add to its collections.

Collection details

Archives, Photography, Religion, Social History, World Cultures

Exhibition details are listed below, you may need to scroll down to see them all.
Zuzana Knobloch

Fate Unknown: The Search for the Missing after the Holocaust

  • 22 February — 30 May 2018 *on now

By the end of World War II, millions of people had been murdered or displaced by war and genocide. Families and communities were torn apart. Many were missing, and some people’s fates remain unclear to this day.

Despite immense logistical challenges, a number of charities, such as the British Red Cross Society and the Jewish Relief Unit, attempted to help find missing people and reunite families. Their efforts came together what became known as the International Tracing Service (ITS).

Co-curated with Professor Dan Stone (Royal Holloway, University of London), this exhibition tells the remarkable, little-known story of the agonising search for the missing after the Holocaust. Drawing upon The Wiener Library’s family document collections and its digital copy of the ITS archive, one of the largest document collections related to the Holocaust in the world, the exhibition considers the legacy of the search for descendants of those affected by World War II, and the impact of fates unknown.

Suitable for

  • 18+
  • 16-17

Admission

Free admission

Website

https://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/fate-unknown

Events details are listed below. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all. For events that don't have a specific date see the 'Resources' tab above.
Toni Schiff Memorial Lecture: Moving Holocaust Stories. Mon 26 Feb 2018

Toni Schiff Memorial Lecture: Moving Holocaust Stories

  • 26 February 2018 6:30-8pm

Toni Schiff, like many Jews before, during, and after the Second World War, was constantly on the move. In part, she was searching for a place that was safe, or at least safer, which saw her move across national borders. But she was also someone who was moved across national borders to one of the most notorious of fixed sites of the Holocaust – Auschwitz. This lecture takes Toni Schiff’s story as a starting point to examine the Holocaust as an event that was both itself constantly on the move, and also involved the mass movement – both forced and ‘voluntary’ – of Jews around the European continent.

Tim Cole is Professor of Social History at the University of Bristol, where he is also Director of the Brigstow Institute. He is the author of a number of books on the Holocaust, most recently Holocaust Landscapes (2016).

This lecture is in memory of Toni Schiff with support from The Toni Schiff Memorial Fund.

Suitable for

  • 18+
  • 16-17

Admission

Free admission. Prior registration via The Wiener Library website essential

Website

https://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/Whats-On?item=375

Book cover for The Participants: The Men of the Wannsee Conference

Book Launch: The Participants: The Men of the Wannsee Conference

  • 28 February 2018 6:30-8pm

Despite lasting less than two hours, the Wannsee Conference is today understood as a signal episode in the history of the Holocaust, exemplifying the labour division and bureaucratization that made the “Final Solution” possible. Yet while the conference itself has been exhaustively researched, many of its attendees remain relatively obscure. Combining accessible prose with scholarly rigor, The Participants presents fascinating profiles of the all-too-human men who implemented some of the most inhuman acts in history.

Hans-Christian Jasch is the Executive Director of the Memorial and Educational Site of the Wannsee Conference. He has authored the definitive study, published in 2012, of Wilhelm Stuckart, state secretary in the Reich Interior Ministry, and the role of the civil service in Jewish policy.

Christoph Kreutzmüller is a curator of the new permanent exhibition at the Jewish Museum Berlin. His acclaimed study Final Sale in Berlin: The Destruction of Jewish Commercial Activity 1930–1945 was published in 2015 by Berghahn Books - and was also launched at The Wiener Library.

Admission

Free but prior registration via The Wiener Library website is essential.

Website

https://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/Whats-On?item=370

Arnaud Rykner talk 06/03/18

“One Train May Hide Another”: Arnaud Rykner’s Le Wagon as Authentic Fiction

  • 6 March 2018 6:30-8pm

Originally published in 2010 (Rouergue), and then in 2012 (Actes Sud), Le Wagon is the sixth work of fiction of French novelist, playwright and scholar, Arnaud Rykner. The novel follows a twenty-two-year-old Jewish resister, deported on Convoy no. 7909, on 2 July 1944. The train, which he boarded together with 2165 other men (mostly resisters, but not only), was the last one to leave Compiègne for Dachau. Since at least 536 of the deportees perished during a journey lasting two and a half days, the convoy became known as “the train of death.” While this may sound like the title of a horror film, the horror of this journey was very much real. The ordeal of the deportees, who were dying or going insane because of the stifling heat, thirst and lack of fresh air, has been amply documented by historians. In this context, can Le Wagon be considered a novel?

In his talk, Arnaud Rykner will discuss his book’s generic status and relation to historical documents and testimonies, as well as the role of historical fiction in attaining and transmitting the truth about the Holocaust.

The event will be chaired by Dr. Helena Duffy from the Holocaust Research Institute, Royal Holloway University of London.

Suitable for

  • 16-17
  • 18+

Admission

Free, reserve tickets via The Wiener Library

Website

https://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/Whats-On?item=384

Daniel Finkelstein & Nick Robinson

Daniel Finkelstein and Nick Robinson in conversation at The Wiener Library

  • 7 March 2018 6:30-8pm

To mark the publication of the first English translation E. I. Bornstein’s 1967 memoir of his experiences during the Holocaust, The Long Night, The Wiener Library are delighted to welcome Daniel Finkelstein and Nick Robinson to reflect upon the role of Holocaust memoirs in education and commemoration of the Holocaust.

Finkelstein and Robinson will take Bornstein’s experiences and his memoir as the starting point for their discussions. As the number of living survivors and witnesses to the Holocaust diminishes, the importance of memoirs such as Bornstein’s can only increase. As descendants of those whose lives were shaped and affected by the rise of the Nazis and the Holocaust, Finkelstein and Robinson will reflect upon the state of Holocaust education and commemoration in Britain.

Originally written shortly after the war, Ernst Israel Bornstein’s powerful memoir, Die Lange Nacht, was originally published in German in 1967. This first English translation has been completed by his daughter, Noemie Lopian. Professor Dan Stone has commented of the book that 'The Long Night is the extraordinary tale of Ernst Israel Bornstein's tortuous passage through a number of Nazi camps. What he endured remind us that there were many different experiences of the camps and that there is no single Holocaust narrative.'

Daniel Finkelstein, Baron Finkelstein, is the grandson of The Wiener Library founder, Dr. Alfred Wiener. He is associate editor and columnist at The Times and a former political advisor and think-tank Chairman.

Nick Robinson is a presenter on the Today programme and a former BBC political editor.

Suitable for

  • 18+
  • 16-17

Admission

Free, reserve tickets via The Wiener Library

Website

https://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/Whats-On?item=373

Dr. Jennifer Rodgers

The International Tracing Service and the ‘Legacies of Political Humanitarianism’

  • 8 March 2018 6:30-8pm

This talk explores the long history of the International Tracing Service (ITS), an agency established by the Western Allies during World War II to locate and reunite persons missing as a course of the hostilities. It tells the story of how states and non- governmental organizations — especially the United States, the Federal Republic of Germany, and the International Committee of the Red Cross — used the purportedly neutral and universal humanitarian services of tracing missing victims of the Holocaust that the ITS offered in pursuit of their respective political and social agendas. Dr. Jennifer Rodgers will discuss how an organization established to ameliorate the crimes of Nazism reframed international humanitarian norms as well as the practice of relief itself. At the same time, Dr. Rodgers will also shine a light on the ways the ITS policies impacted not only Holocaust memory, but also how the history of National Socialism and the Holocaust was — and still is — negotiated.

Dr. Jennifer Rodgers, is a historian who is currently a lecturer at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Rodgers, a former postdoctoral fellow at the University of South Florida, is PhD alumna of the University of Pennsylvania. Her work focuses on German and European history in its inter- and transnational contexts. She is currently completing a book manuscript titled The Archives of Humanity: The International Tracing Service, The Holocaust and Postwar Order. It examines the International Tracing Service and the ways in which it reframed humanitarianism in the post-World War II world. Dr. Rodgers has held a wide array of fellowships and grants from institutions in the United States and Europe including the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, DC; the Mémorial de la Shoah in Paris; the Institut de hautes études internationales et du développement in Geneva, Switzerland; the Freie Universität in Berlin; and the Zentrum für Zeithistorische Forschung in Potsdam, Germany.

Admission

Free admission, prior registration via The Wiener Library website is essential

Website

https://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/Whats-On?item=380

‘A Wounded Landscape’ with Marc Wilson

Talk: ‘A Wounded Landscape’

  • 15 March 2018 6:30-8pm

In this talk photographer Marc Wilson will discuss his ongoing photography project, 'A Wounded Landscape' which deals with the shadow of the Holocaust. Based on a small number of stories, ‘A Wounded Landscape’ is being made at up to 250 locations throughout Europe and the former Soviet Republics.

The landscape of much of Europe and the former Soviet republics is marked with the tragedy of the Holocaust. There are nearly forty thousand sites, in Germany and in countries that the Germans occupied in the Second World War, where the Nazis and their collaborators systematically murdered nearly six million Jews and a huge number of people from other groups which they considered racially inferior, or for ideological and political reasons. These included Roma, homosexuals, the mentally disabled, Jehovah’s Witnesses, Communists, and also more than three million Soviet prisoners of war.

These sites are deeply connected to stories of individuals. Stories of those murdered in the camps and beyond, stories of the ever-shrinking number of survivors from this period of history, and stories of the second and third generation survivors, and beyond. Those left behind and remaining. Their families, homes, and culture torn apart.

Throughout these countries today, these sites persist. Sites where individual killings and slaughter on a mass scale took place. Destroyed communities and ghettos; internment camps, transit camps, labour camps, subcamps, concentration camps, extermination camps and displacement camps; the journeys to and from them and the landscapes that surround them.

This work is made up of photographs, (landscape, documentary, portrait and still life), oral histories and text. Based on a number of these stories and their connected locations, it is made up of a visual response to and document of these places.

Suitable for

  • 16-17
  • 18+

Admission

Free, reserve tickets via The Wiener Library

Website

https://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/Whats-On?item=381

Group of women & children arriving at Auschwitz

Mothers, Sisters, Resisters? Motherhood and the Holocaust Twenty Years on

  • 22 March 2018 6:30-8pm

Part of the Holocaust and Motherhood conference organised by Royal Holloway, University of London.

Women’s experience of the Holocaust remains a marginal subject. Even recent studies which claim to offer a comprehensive account tend to ignore or downplay the specific importance of women’s testimony. As we prepare to celebrate the twentieth anniversary of Brana Gurewitsch’s path-breaking Mothers, Sisters, Resisters, Zoë Waxman will seek to explain why it is that women are still being silenced, and why motherhood, in particular, deserves serious attention.

Dr. Zoë Waxman is a Senior Research Fellow at the Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies. She previously taught in the history faculty in Oxford and at Royal Holloway, University of London, where she was fellow in Holocaust Studies. She is the author of Writing the Holocaust: Identity, Testimony, Representation (2006), Anne Frank (2015), and Women in the Holocaust: A Feminist History (2017) as well as numerous articles relating to the Holocaust and genocide. A board member of the British Association of Holocaust Studies, she also sits on the editorial board of Holocaust Studies and the Journal of Modern Jewish Studies. She is a trustee of The Wiener Library and a member of the academic advisory board for the Imperial War Museum's Holocaust galleries.

Admission

Free but prior registration via The Wiener Library website is essential.

Website

https://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/Whats-On?item=368

Codename Suzette cover

Book Talk: Codename Suzette: An Extraordinary Story of Resistance and Rescue in Nazi Paris

  • 26 March 2018 6:30-8pm

Suzanne Spaak was born into an affluent Belgian Catholic family and married into the country's leading political dynasty. Her brother-in-law was the prime minister while her husband Claude was a playwright and patron of the painter René Magritte. In occupied Paris she mingled with the cultural elite including Colette and Jean Cocteau. But Suzanne was living a double life.

Her friendship with a Polish Jewish refugee led her to her life's purpose. When France fell and the Nazis occupied Paris, she joined the Resistance. She used her fortune and social status to enlist allies among wealthy Parisians and church groups. Under the eyes of the Gestapo, Suzanne and women from the Jewish and Christian resistance groups 'kidnapped' hundreds of Jewish children to save them from the gas chambers.

Codename Suzette is a masterpiece of research and narrative, bringing to life a truly remarkable woman and painting a vivid and unforgettable picture of wartime Paris.

Suitable for

  • 16-17
  • 18+

Admission

Free, reserve tickets via The Wiener Library

Website

https://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/Whats-On?item=386

Book Launch: Miracles do Happen

Book Launch: Miracles do Happen

  • 9 April 2018 From 6:30pm

Henry Rosenbloom founded the publishing house Scribe 40 years ago in Melbourne, and today publishes over 100 titles annually across the UK, the US and Australia. Scribe’s titles range from literary fiction to books on politics and science, and include many acclaimed books of Jewish interest including My Promised Land by Ari Shavit, Nightmare in Berlin by Hans Fallada and Emancipaton by Michael Goldfarb, along with a forthcoming book on antisemitism by Deborah Lipstadt. He has also published a number of Holocaust memoirs and anthologies.

A son of Holocaust survivors, Henry was born in Paris, France, in 1947, and he credits his parents' amazing and devastating history with inspiring him to pursue a life of publishing books with social impact, whether they deal with racial oppression in the US, the means by which dictators can be overthrown or the lives of slum dwellers. He says ‘My basic motivation in starting a publishing house was almost fiercely wanting to make readers pay attention to what was going on in the world around them. And in today’s world, I still feel like that.’

Miracles Do Happen is the story of Henry's parents, Felix and Fela Rozenblum, who were childhood sweethearts in Poland before WWII separated them - Fela was sent to Auschwitz, and Felix to a Soviet labour camp - who, incredibly, managed to reunite and start a new life in Australia. It will be published in the UK in April 2018.

Suitable for

  • 16-17
  • 18+

Admission

Free, reserve tickets via The Wiener Library

Website

https://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/Whats-On?item=383

Curators’ Talk: Fate Unknown: The Search for the Missing after the Holocaust

Curators’ Talk: Fate Unknown: The Search for the Missing after the Holocaust

  • 19 April 2018 6:30-8pm

Delve deeper into the personal histories, collections and themes that make up The Wiener Library’s current temporary exhibition on the search for the missing after the Holocaust. Co-curators Dr. Christine Schmidt and Professor Dan Stone will discuss the inspiration for and development of Fate Unknown: The Search for the Missing after the Holocaust.

Suitable for

  • 18+
  • 16-17

Admission

Free, reserve tickets via The Wiener Library

Website

https://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/Whats-On?item=377

Holocaust Consciousness, German Jewish Refugees and the Civil Rights Struggle in Post-War America

Talk: Holocaust Consciousness, German Jewish Refugees and the Civil Rights Struggle in Post-War America

  • 24 April 2018 6:30-8pm

“When I was the rabbi of the Jewish community in Berlin under the Hitler regime, I learned many things. The most important thing that I learned under those tragic circumstances was that bigotry and hatred are not the most urgent problem. The most urgent, the most disgraceful, the most shameful and the most tragic problem is silence.” Those words were spoken by Rabbi Joachim Prinz (1902–1988) addressing the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom on August 28, 1963, in Washington D.C., by then the biggest demonstration of the African American Civil Rights Movement.

Dr. David Juenger will take this event and this quote as a vantage point to explore the participation of Jewish refugees from Nazi Germany in the African American Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 1960s. He will talk about various personages, especially Rabbi Joachim Prinz, a Zionist rabbi who left Berlin in 1937 and became an important figure of American Jewry from the 1950s through the 1970s.

It is the purpose of this talk to highlight the historical experience with Nazi oppression of those protagonists as a key instrument for understanding their later activism in the Civil Rights Movement. It is argued argument that the Jewish involvement in the Civil Rights Movement cannot be understood without an understanding of early Holocaust memory in the United States and without looking at those Jews who had fled Nazi-occupied Europe and became leading activist of post-war American Jewry.

Suitable for

  • 16-17
  • 18+

Admission

Free, reserve tickets via The Wiener Library

Website

https://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/Whats-On?item=382

Fate Unknown Series: Film Screening – Fred Zinnemann’s The Search

Fate Unknown Series: Film Screening – Fred Zinnemann’s The Search

  • 26 April 2018 6:30-8pm

In honour of Fred Zinnemann’s birth month and as part of The Wiener Library’s Fate Unknown exhibition series, we are pleased to host a free screening of Zinnemann’s The Search (1948). The screening will be accompanied by a talk from renowned expert on Zinnemann’s work, Professor J. E. Smyth (University of Warwick).

Starring Ivan Jandl, Montgomery Clift, Aline MacMahon, and Jarmila Novotna, The Search tells the story of a young Auschwitz survivor and his mother who search for each other across postwar Europe. Zinnemann was one of the first filmmakers allowed inside postwar Germany, and he spent months interviewing child Holocaust survivors, many of whom appear in the film.

Suitable for

  • 16-17
  • 18+

Admission

Free, reserve tickets via The Wiener Library

Website

https://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/Whats-On?item=378

Fate Unknown Series: The Power of Words by Survivor Leslie Kleinman

Fate Unknown Series: The Power of Words by Survivor Leslie Kleinman

  • 30 April 2018 1:30-3pm

Leslie (Lázár) Kleinman was born on 29th May 1929 in Ambud, a small village near Satu Mare in Romania, into an Orthodox Jewish family. He had four brothers and three sisters and his father was a Rabbi. The family's peaceful world was first disrupted when Hungary occupied this area in 1940. Worse was to come in 1944 when Germany invaded Hungary, arriving in Ambud on Shabbat. His father was deported. In April 1944, the rest of Leslie’s family were forced to enter the ghetto, where they were held for a month. From the ghetto, Leslie and his family were deported to Auschwitz-Birkenau. Although Leslie was only fourteen, he said that he was older and was selected for work. He was separated from the rest of his family who were all taken straight to the gas chamber with the exception of one sister.

Part of the Wiener Library’s Fate Unknown exhibition series, this daytime talk will feature Mr Kleinman, who will speak about his experiences during the Holocaust and his story of survival, including his time in the Kloster Indersdorf children’s centre run by the UN Relief and Rehabilitation Administration and learning about the fate of his family after the war.

Mr Kleinman was recognized for his service to Holocaust education in the 2018 New Year’s Honours List.

Suitable for

  • 16-17
  • 18+

Admission

Free, reserve tickets via The Wiener Library

Website

https://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/Whats-On?item=374

Fate Unknown Series: “The Greatest Detective Story in History” and the Search for Missing Children after the Holocaust

Fate Unknown Series: “The Greatest Detective Story in History” and the Search for Missing Children after the Holocaust

  • 3 May 2018 6:30-8pm

In 1950, Alan Burgess's BBC radio play, The Greatest Detective Story in History, gave unprecedented and moving insight into the work of the International Tracing Service (ITS), particularly with regard to its efforts to find missing children after the Second World War. The play also captures the ways in which the Nazi period was understood in Britain in the post-war years.

Part of The Wiener Library's Fate Unknown exhibition series, this event will include a talk by Professor Dan Stone, co-curator of the exhibition, and a dramatic reading of excerpts of the Burgess radio play.

To be dramatised by:
Alicia Ambrose-Bayly - Alicia trained at The Central School of Speech and Drama. TV and Film credits include: Emmerdale, the lead role in BAFTA long listed film Darklight and the lead in Mongrel Country. Theatre includes a U.K. and Ireland No.1 Tour of A Murder is Announced, a UK No.1 Tour of Kindertransport, Shoot I didn’t Mean That at The National Theatre. Voice works includes First Officer Amelia Curtis in ATA Girl directed by Lou Jameson for Big Finish Productions, Ha'penny in WW2 comedy Dot and Kerry’s List with Kerry Godliman, for BBC Radio 4.

Will Hartley - William is best known for his work with award-winning sketch group Clever Peter, with whom he co-wrote and starred in five sell-out Edinburgh Fringe shows, toured nationally, and created a critically acclaimed Radio 4 series, Strap In - It’s Clever Peter (Pozzitive Productions). He has been on screen in The One Griff (BBC) alongside Griff Rhys Jones, as well as E4’s Cardinal Burns, BBC3’s Otherworld, and BAFTA-nominated CBBC sketch show FIT. He recently premiered his one-man comedy Western show, GUN, at the VAULT Festival.

Rosie Holden - Rosie trained at Drama Centre London. Her work in theatre includes Each His Own Wilderness (Orange Tree Theatre) Love Me Do (Watford Palace); Mother Courage and Her Children (The Platform Theatre); Kindertransport (UK tour); and After the Ball (Theatre 503). TV includes Father Brown (BBC), Midsomer Murders (ITV) and Lewis (ITV). Film includes Cold Blow Lane and Wrong Turn 5.

Steve Wickenden - Steve is an actor/singer/educator based in Kent. His most recent stage work was in the Grand Opera House York’s record-breaking Beauty and the Beast and he is the lead singer of the vintage rock & roll band The Bandits. Steve works in youth theatre and therapeutic drama, implementing workshops for young people with emotional and behavioural difficulties and those from less advantaged backgrounds. He completed a Master’s degree in Holocaust Studies from Royal Holloway, in 2016.

Lecture provided by:
Dan Stone is Professor of Modern History and Director of the Holocaust Research Institute at Royal Holloway, University of London. He is a historian of ideas who works primarily on twentieth-century European history. His research interests include: the history and interpretation of the Holocaust, comparative genocide, history of anthropology, history of fascism, the cultural history of the British Right and theory of history. He is the author or editor of sixteen books and some seventy scholarly articles

The play's author:
Alan Burgess (1915 - 1998) was an RAF pilot and English author who wrote several biographical and non-fiction books between the 1950s and the 1970s. He wrote biographies of Gladys Aylward and Flora Sandes, and co-wrote Ingrid Bergman's autobiography. Having served in the RAF during World War II, Burgess went on to write The Longest Tunnel: The True Story of World War II's Great Escape, the story of "the Great Escape."

Suitable for

  • 18+
  • 16-17
  • Any age

Admission

£5, purchase tickets via The Wiener Library

Website

https://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/Whats-On?item=385

'That is Bella, Only Seven': The Depiction of Holocaust Survivors in Liberator Narratives

Fate Unknown Series: 'That is Bella, Only Seven': The Depiction of Holocaust Survivors in Liberator Narratives

  • 10 May 2018 6:30-8pm

Witnessing the immediate aftermath of the Holocaust had a profound effect on the military forces that liberated Nazi concentration camps. Dr. Mark Celinscak will discuss his recent book, which re-examines the surrender and relief of the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in northwest Germany at the end of the Second World War. His talk will survey the personal narratives of both British and Canadian military personnel as they responded to the situation at the camp, drawing on diaries, letters, and personal interviews.

Dr. Celinscak is a historian of twentieth-century Britain and Europe, specializing in war, Holocaust and genocide studies. He is the author of Distance from the Belsen Heap: Allied Forces and the Liberation of a Nazi Concentration Camp, a work which re-examines the surrender and relief of the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in northwest Germany at the end of the Second World War. His award-winning book explores how military personnel struggled with the intense experience of liberation, how they attempted to describe what they had seen, heard, and felt to those back home, and how their lives were ultimately transformed by the encounter. His primary area of research is the Second World War and its impact on the twentieth century. He is particularly interested in the relationship between war and culture. He is currently working on a book that explores the process of denazification in postwar Germany. This project is being supported by a European Holocaust Research Infrastructure fellowship at The Wiener Library for the Study of the Holocaust and Genocide in London, England.

Dr. Celinscak is the Louis and Frances Blumkin Professor of Holocaust and Genocide Studies, and Executive Director of the Sam and Frances Fried Holocaust and Genocide Academy at the University of Nebraska Omaha.

Suitable for

  • 16-17
  • 18+

Admission

Free, reserve tickets via The Wiener Library

Website

https://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/Whats-On?item=379

Fate Unknown Series: Workshop - Resources for Family Research

Fate Unknown Series: Workshop - Resources for Family Research

  • 22 May 2018 10am-12:30pm

The Wiener Library, the world’s oldest archive of material on the Holocaust and the Nazi era, invites you to this half-day workshop to learn more about the historical sources, evidence and methods used in tracing the paths of persecution of those impacted by the Holocaust and World War II.

Part of the Library’s Fate Unknown exhibition series, the workshop will provide participants the opportunity to learn about The Wiener Library’s unique history and collections, and hear from an expert about the Library’s International Tracing Service archive, its history and how it is used to uncover the fate of those caught up in the Holocaust.

The workshop will also include a talk by Jeanette R. Rosenberg OBE, a specialist on German-Jewish genealogy and Education and Outreach Officer for the Jewish Genealogical Society of Great Britain.

Suitable for

  • 16-17
  • 18+

Admission

Free, reserve tickets via The Wiener Library

Website

https://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/Whats-On?item=376

Resources listed here may include websites, bookable tours and workshops, books, loan boxes and more. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all.

Online Learning Materials

http://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/wls.aspx

A selection of the Wiener Library's unique stories and materials are now remotely accessible to anyone who wishes to learn more about the Holocaust and the Nazi era. The site allows users to trace different topics interactively, as well as providing background information on connected themes. The materials currently include detailed information on 'Childhood under the Swastika', 'Helping the Survivors' and the fascinating story of German-Jewish factory owner Ludwig Neumann.

Creator

  • The Wiener Library

How to obtain

The Wiener Library Learning Materials are freely accessible to everyone via the Wiener Library website.

Getting there

By tube:
• Russell Square (Piccadilly line)
• Goodge Street (Northern line)
• St Pancras International (Metropolitan, Northern, Circle, Victoria and Hammersmith & City lines)

By bus:
The following buses stop nearby:
7, 59, 68, X68, 91, 168, 188

Access:
In 2011 the Library moved to new premises in a historic location in Russell Square.
• There is a disabled lift outside of the building, and once inside the building, all floors are accessible via the indoor lift.
• There are adapted toilets on the basement level.
• The nearest step-free underground station is King’s Cross, St Pancras.

The Wiener Library
29 Russell Square
London
Greater London
WC1B 5DP
England

Website

www.wienerlibrary.co.uk

E-mail

info@wienerlibrary.co.uk

Telephone

020 7636 7247

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
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