Packwood House - National Trust

Packwood House - National Trust
Packwood Lane
Lapworth
Warwickshire
B94 6AT
England

logo: Heritage Open Days 2014

Website

www.nationaltrust.org.uk/packwood-house/

E-mail

packwood@nationaltrust.org.uk

Telephone

01564 782024

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
Packwood House

Much-restored Tudor house, park and garden with notable topiary.

The culmination of a lifetime of dreams: salvaged objects and exotic pieces come together in a Jacobean meets Edwardian style. Beautiful, homely, warm and welcoming. We can't put it better than a visitor in the 1920s did: A house to dream of, a garden to dream in.

The house was originally built in the 16th century, yet its interiors were extensively restored between the First and Second World Wars by Graham Baron Ash to create a fascinating 20th-century evocation of domestic Tudor architecture.

Packwood House contains a fine collection of 16th-century textiles and furniture, and the gardens have renowned herbaceous borders and a famous collection of yews.

Venue Type:

Historic house or home, Garden, parklands or rural site

Opening hours

Please check the National Trust website before visiting.

Admission charges

Adult: £9.60
Child: £4.80
Family: £24.00
Group adult: £8.20

Collection details

Costume and Textiles, Decorative and Applied Art, Social History, Fine Art

Exhibition details are listed below, you may need to scroll down to see them all.
Packwood Follies Inside Out House

Packwood Follies

  • 1 April 2014 — 1 March 2016 *on now

The National Trust’s Packwood House is delighted to present Packwood Follies, three new site specific installations InsideOutHouse, Embedded and Hive by artist Hilary Jack.
The transformation from the mundane to the extraordinary is a persistent theme within Jack’s work. For Packwood Follies at Packwood House, she has transformed a coppiced Oak tree into an oversized hand carved four-poster bed, and a collection of salvaged faux Tudor furniture destined for landfill into a folklorish cottage and a network of miniature cabins and huts. The flotsam and jetsam of everyday life are reused to form sculptural installations that comment on the history and politics of the location while referencing the journey objects make from conception through to consumption, obsolescence and decay.

Jack has taken inspiration from Packwood’s original ‘Follies’ of the 1920s where short theatrical entertainments were performed in the gardens, and from the actions of Graham Baron Ash, the last private owner of Packwood who extensively restored the house in the 1900‘s. He created an evocation of a Tudor Mansion using reproduction and antique Tudor furniture, paneling and fireplaces rescued from other country houses that were being demolished at the time.

Jack’s contemporary reworking of the follies includes InsideOutHouse, a cottage in the Bluebell Wood constructed from found faux Tudor furniture. Sustainability, industry and the outsider are all brought to the fore. Just less than human scale, InsideOutHouse conjures up feelings of The Uncanny. Lying somewhere between a Grimm Brothers’ witches dwelling and a simple homestead it mixes the familiar with the strange, highlighting the sense of enchantment brought about because of the duplicity of appearances at Packwood. InsideOutHouse embodies the romantic spirit of the homesteader, while acting as an antidote to the arrogance of corporate expansion and town planning.

Referencing a remark by a visitor about Packwood in the 1930s “a house to dream of, a garden to dream in”, Embedded, is an oversized hand-carved, four-poster, mock Tudor bed sited in park-land at Packwood. Reminiscent of the historic beds within the mansion, and of famous beds in history, literature and The Arts, Embedded is planted with a coverlet of turf that visitors are invited to climb onto. Dwarfed by their surroundings, Embedded offers viewers a place to contemplate their place in the world and to dream.

Hive is a network of miniature cabins and huts of differing character sited within the formal gardens between the nooks and crannies of walls and bushes. Made from found wood from around the estate these small artworks pay homage to the secretive and seemingly magical work of the generations of gardeners who have tended the estate at Packwood.

Suitable for

  • Any age

Website

http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/packwood

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