Lifelong Learning Centre, University of Leeds

We run as a School for adult, part-time and Foundation Year study especially, but not exclusively, for those from disadvantaged backgrounds. We also operate as a Service with a range of functions to meet the needs of our various cohorts on a ‘one-stop-shop’ basis. In addition, much of our provision is targeted specifically at the local community, supporting public engagement such as our 'Spring into Summer' programme.

Venue Type:

Association or society

Opening hours

Monday - Friday 9.00am - 5.00pm

Admission charges

Free.

Events details are listed below. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all. For events that don't have a specific date see the 'Resources' tab above.
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Reading the Scrolls of Auschwitz

  • 9 June 2016 5:30-7pm

Between February 1945 and October 1980, eight caches of documents were found buried in the grounds around Crematoria II and III of Auschwitz-Birkenau.

They had been written by members of the Sonderkommando, the ‘special squad’ of slave labourers made up almost exclusively of Jewish prisoners. Their task was to dispose of the bodies of people murdered in the gas chambers, knowing that they too would eventually be murdered in turn.

Their writings, sometimes called the ‘Scrolls of Auschwitz,’ are a series of remarkable eyewitness accounts of Nazi genocide. Little read and virtually undiscussed for several decades, they have only recently come to public attention, as they inspired this year’s Oscar winner for Best Foreign Language Film, Son of Saul. This session will explain the work undertaken with the Scrolls in the Auschwitz archive, what they tell us about the Sonderkommando specifically, and their importance for our understanding of the Holocaust.

Dominic Williams is the Montague Burton Fellow in Jewish Studies at the University of Leeds. He is the co-author, with Nicholas Chare, of Matters of Testimony: Interpreting the Scrolls of Auschwitz (Berghahn, 2016).

Where

Marjorie & Arnold Ziff Building, University of Leeds
Cavendish Road
Leeds
LS2 9JT
England

Website

http://www.llc.leeds.ac.uk/events/reading-the-scrolls-of-auschwitz

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Calamity Corbyn? Why our political leaders fail

  • 14 June 2016 5:30-7pm

Many people believe that the Labour Party is destined to lose with Jeremy Corbyn as leader.

But what are the chances of political leaders succeeding nowadays? Almost everything leaders do is analysed in detail by a 24 hour media – including where they go on holiday, or even how they eat a bacon sandwich! Contemporary leaders usually do not last more than a few years in their posts, and all of the main parties have forced leaders out of office – for example Iain Duncan Smith (Conservative), Tony Blair (Labour) and Charles Kennedy (Liberal Democrats).

Why might this be? Is it just that recent party leaders such as Corbyn lack the skills required, or have too many personal failings? Or has the job of party leader become so demanding that few people can impress in the role?

We will examine the prospects for current party leaders and consider what kind of leadership might succeed in an unforgiving era.

Website

http://www.llc.leeds.ac.uk/events/calamity-corbyn-why-our-political-leaders-fail

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Exploring Canada’s National Aboriginal Day: ‘We Talk, You Listen’ Native North America and the Politics of Cinema

  • 21 June 2016 6-8pm

In The Inconvenient Indian, Native-Canadian writer Thomas King suggests that ‘film, in all its forms, has been the only place where most North Americans have seen Indians’. He is, of course, talking about Christopher Columbus’s version of ‘Indians’: the indigenous peoples of the Americas.

This event takes its lead from Thomas King’s suggestion, but he could also be talking about the UK. Based at the University of Kent, David Stirrup – our guest speaker – is a specialist in Native American and Canadian Aboriginal literature and culture; in his talk, he will take us on a journey through cinema thinking in particular about the Native North American perspective. We will be asked to rethink popular representations of ‘Indians’ on screen – and we will also get the opportunity to learn more about Native North American film-making and the way indigenous peoples are finding new ways to revisit history and tell their own stories with time for discussion and questions.

Where

Marjorie & Arnold Ziff Building
Cavendish Road
Leeds
LS2 9JT
England

Website

http://www.llc.leeds.ac.uk/events/exploring-canadas-national-aboriginal-day-we-talk-you-listen-native-north-america-and-the-politics-of-cinema

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Exploring Canada’s National Aboriginal Day: A film screening of the documentary ‘Reel Injun’

  • 21 June 2016 3-5pm

We are marking Canada’s National Aboriginal Day by thinking about the North American continent from the perspective of its indigenous peoples.

In Reel Injun Cree filmmaker Neil Diamond takes a look at the ‘Hollywood Indian’, exploring and critiquing the portrayal of North American Natives through a century of cinema.

Traveling through the heartland of America, and into the Canadian North, Diamond looks at how the myth of ‘the Injun’ has influenced the world’s understanding — and misunderstanding — of Natives.

We will have time for a short discussion – to be chaired by the Director of the Leeds Centre for Canadian Studies, Catherine Bates – after the screening of the film. Further discussion can take place over refreshments between 5.00 – 6.00pm in the Marjorie & Arnold Ziff Building (LLC staff can escort attendees from the screening venue in Clothworkers’ Building North).

Where

Clothworkers Building North, University of Leeds
Off Woodhouse Lane
Leeds
LS2 9JT
England

Website

http://www.llc.leeds.ac.uk/events/exploring-canadas-national-aboriginal-day-a-film-screening-of-the-documentary-reel-injun

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Thinking about Europe: The Fate of German and British ‘Enemy Aliens’ during the First World War

  • 22 June 2016 6-8pm

In 1914, British and German men were mobilised to fight each other on the Western Front while the populations at home also braced themselves for war. But what happened to the thousands of British and German husbands, wives and children, tourists, business travellers, seamen, artists, exchange students, teachers, academics, waiters, hairdressers and more who visited or lived in Germany and Britain, respectively, when war was declared?

This interactive workshop addresses the topical questions of European borders, migration, intermarriage and expatriate communities by taking us back 100 years to Britain and Germany during the years 1914-1919.

Drawing on archival material and memoirs held in the Liddle Collection at the Brotherton Library, University of Leeds, we will explore the phenomenon of civilian internment and the Engländerlager Ruhleben near Berlin, where British civilians were held, as well as Lofthouse Park Camp between Wakefield and Leeds, one of many camps for German civilians across the British Empire.

Where

Shephard Room, Treasures of the Brotherton Gallery
Parkinson Building, University of Leeds, Woodhouse Lane
Leeds
LS2 9JT

Website

http://www.llc.leeds.ac.uk/events/thinking-about-europe-the-fate-of-german-and-british-enemy-aliens-during-the-first-world-war

Lifelong Learning Centre, University of Leeds
Woodhouse Lane
Leeds
LS2 9JT
England

Website

www.llc.leeds.ac.uk/public-engagement/spring-into-summer

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
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