Lifelong Learning Centre, University of Leeds

We run as a School for adult, part-time and Foundation Year study especially, but not exclusively, for those from disadvantaged backgrounds. We also operate as a Service with a range of functions to meet the needs of our various cohorts on a ‘one-stop-shop’ basis. In addition, much of our provision is targeted specifically at the local community, supporting public engagement such as our 'Spring into Summer' programme.

Venue Type:

Association or society

Opening hours

Monday - Friday 9.00am - 5.00pm

Admission charges

Free.

Events details are listed below. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all. For events that don't have a specific date see the 'Resources' tab above.
Great Hall, University of Leeds

The Islamic Caliphate Revived?

  • 8 June 2015 6-8:30pm
  • 15 June 2015 6-8:30pm
  • 22 June 2015 6-8:30pm
  • 29 June 2015 6-8:30pm

Tutor: Dr Abdul B Shaikh

This four-week introductory course on the emergence of the Global Islamic Caliphate
will be of particular interest to those who wish to gain a more nuanced understanding of the factors that have led to the gradual rise of groups around the world such as Al-Qaeda, the Taliban and ISIS in the late 20th and early 21st centuries.

Session 1: The Caliphate Explained?
Session 2: The Taliban: Rise of the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan
Session 3: Al-Qaeda: Development and Creation of a Pan-Islamic Global Jihadist Franchise
Session 4: The Emergence of ISIS: Islamic State of Iraq and Syria

Suitable for

  • Not suitable for children

Admission

Standard fee: £34.00
Concessions (available to anyone in receipt of one of the following means-tested benefits: Income Support
Income-Based Jobseeker’s Allowance or New Deal Allowance, Working Tax Credit, Housing Benefit or Local Housing Allowance, Pension Credit, Carer’s Allowance, Council Tax Support, Income Related Employment and Support Allowance, Universal Credit): £17.00

Website

http://www.llc.leeds.ac.uk/public-engagement/spring-into-summer

Great Hall, University of Leeds

Travel Writing

  • 8 June 2015 10:30am-1pm
  • 15 June 2015 10:30am-1pm
  • 22 June 2015 10:30am-1pm
  • 29 June 2015 10:30am-1pm

Tutor: Bronwin Patrickson

Do you love to travel? Want to learn how to write up your travel stories so that
people will want to read more? In this course you will learn how to use techniques of journalism and fiction writing to research, write and publish engaging records of your travel experiences. Whether you want to write a blog for friends, or pitch stories to magazine editors this course will take you through the process step by step.

What you will learn:
 What you need to know before you even arrive
 Why there are different types of travel writing for different audiences
 How to target your approach to suit your chosen audience
 How to structure your writing to tell engaging stories
 How to research your stories and find people to interview on the road
 The best way to pitch your story idea to an editor
 The opportunities being presented by new media

The course will take a hands-on approach to travel writing, with practical exercises in class each week, opportunities for feedback on your work from your peers and the
tutor, as well as the chance to read and gain inspiration from some outstanding examples of travel writing.

Suitable for

  • Not suitable for children

Admission

Standard fee: £34.00
Concessions (available to anyone in receipt of one of the following means-tested benefits: Income Support, Income-Based Jobseeker’s Allowance or New Deal Allowance
Working Tax Credit, Housing Benefit or Local Housing Allowance, Pension Credit, Carer’s Allowance, Council Tax Support, Income Related Employment and Support Allowance, Universal Credit): £17.00

Website

http://www.llc.leeds.ac.uk/public-engagement/spring-into-summer

Great Hall, University of Leeds

The Book's Better!: Exploring Literary Film Adaptations

  • 9 June 2015 6:30-8:30pm
  • 16 June 2015 6:30-8:30pm
  • 23 June 2015 6:30-8:30pm
  • 30 June 2015 6:30-8:30pm
  • 7 July 2015 6:30-8:30pm
  • 14 July 2015 6:30-8:30pm

Tutor: Dr. Catherine Bates

What makes a good film adaptation? How faithful should a film adaptation be to the original text? And how might multiple adaptations of the same text change the way we read the original text?

Love them or loathe them, film adaptations dominate the contemporary film industry – and in turn they help to sell books. In this course we will consider the multiple adaptation of classic texts (such as Pride and Prejudice and The Great Gatsby) alongside lesser-known short stories and poems, in order to think about how film adaptations can work variously as translations, interpretations and contemporary re-writings of the original literary text.

Do film adaptations, rather than working as poor imitations, actually reread and renew the original texts? This six-week course will provide you with an opportunity to explore these questions in a friendly, informal setting.

Suitable for

  • Not suitable for children

Admission

Standard fee: £40.00
Concessions (available to anyone in receipt of one of the following means-tested benefits: Income Support, Income-Based Jobseeker’s Allowance or New Deal Allowance, Working Tax Credit, Housing Benefit or Local Housing Allowance, Pension Credit, Carer’s Allowance, Council Tax Support, Income Related Employment and Support Allowance, Universal Credit): £20.00

Website

http://www.llc.leeds.ac.uk/public-engagement/spring-into-summer

Great Hall, University of Leeds

Fairy Tales: From Fiction to Fine Art

  • 10 June 2015 6-8:30pm
  • 17 June 2015 6-8:30pm
  • 24 June 2015 6-8:30pm
  • 1 July 2015 6-8:30pm

Tutors: Dr Zoë Enstone and Dr Madeleine Newman

Fairy tales are continually being re-told within contemporary culture with plenty of examples to be found in fiction, film and even fine art today. In their various adaptations, they offer us an escape into an imaginary realm. However, the world of the story is often not quite what it seems, with the genre of the fairy tale being somewhat problematic: does ‘happily ever after’ really exist?

Over four weeks, this introductory course will delve into the rich world of the fairy tale to investigate traditional and historic versions, as well as contemporary re-workings and
subversions. Join us for lots of lively discussion as we examine a range of forms from texts and accompanying illustrations, to representations in film, television and the visual arts.

Suitable for

  • Not suitable for children

Admission

Standard fee: £34.00
Concessions (available to anyone in receipt of one of the following means-tested benefits: Income Support, Income-Based Jobseeker’s Allowance or New Deal Allowance, Working Tax Credit, Housing Benefit or Local Housing Allowance, Pension Credit, Carer’s Allowance, Council Tax Support, Income Related Employment and Support, Allowance, Universal Credit): £17.00

Website

http://www.llc.leeds.ac.uk/public-engagement/spring-into-summer

Great Hall, University of Leeds

Conversational Arabic

  • 10 June 2015 6-8pm
  • 17 June 2015 6-8pm
  • 24 June 2015 6-8pm
  • 1 July 2015 6-8pm
  • 8 July 2015 6-8pm
  • 15 July 2015 6-8pm

Tutor: Dr Samar Al-Afandi
Have you learnt some Arabic but don't have anybody to practice speaking it with? Perhaps you used to speak some Arabic but now it’s a bit rusty and you’re keen to regain your language skills? If so, this six-week course could be for you.

The interactive course will provide an opportunity to increase your ability to have an
everyday social conversation in Arabic about familiar topics, such as introducing yourself, friends and family, describing where you live, talking about the weather, food and drink. In addition, this course will enhance your understanding of basic grammatical structures and introduce you to some aspects of Arab culture. Teaching methods will include formal instruction, group work and role plays.

N.B. Please note that this course is aimed at people who can already read and
converse in Arabic at a basic level. It is not suitable for complete beginners.
In order to ensure this is the right course for you, please contact the course tutor Dr
Samar Al-Afandi on 0113 343 3188 / s.al-afandi@leeds.ac.uk and she will be happy to
advise you

Suitable for

  • Not suitable for children

Admission

Standard fee: £40.00
Concessions (available to anyone in receipt of one of the following means-tested benefits: Income Support, Income-Based Jobseeker’s Allowance or New Deal Allowance, Working Tax Credit, Housing Benefit or Local Housing Allowance, Pension Credit, Carer’s Allowance, Council Tax Support, Income Related Employment and Support, Allowance, Universal Credit): £20.00

Website

http://www.llc.leeds.ac.uk/public-engagement/spring-into-summer

Great Hall, University of Leeds

Payday Loans and the Regulation of Low-Income Lending

  • 11 June 2015 5:30-7:30pm

Payday loans and the rates of interest charged on them are regularly in the news.

With companies like Wonga having charged interest of over 5000% on some loans, these companies for many seem predatory and exemplify the worst excesses of finance.
This seminar will analyse the markets of these short-term loans with reference to a much older form of low income lending - home credit.

The aim is to highlight the demographics and structure of the market, and ultimately, to understand what it means when we say 5000%. It may not be as clear-cut as politicians and regulators say, and convenient headlines don't always lead to good outcomes. Maybe there is a place for the likes of Wonga?

Suitable for

  • Not suitable for children

Website

http://www.llc.leeds.ac.uk/sis

Great Hall, University of Leeds

Mash-Up Short Stories

  • 16 June 2015 10am-4pm

Tutor: Ebba Brooks

“No surprise in the writer, no surprise in the reader,” said the poet Robert Frost. The same could be argued of creating short stories. So the aim of this workshop is to help you create new and surprising short stories, using examples that bring together seemingly incompatible elements from different genres and traditions - like Franz Kafka's Metamorphoses (a huge fly lands in a realist short story?!).

We’ll do a mixture of reading and writing, guided by creative exercises, to generate all sorts of ideas during the workshop. By the end of the session, you will be on your way to creating your own mash-up short story (or perhaps more than one).

Suitable for

  • Not suitable for children

Admission

Standard fee: £17.00
Concessions (available to anyone in receipt of one of the following means-tested benefits: Income Support; Income-Based Jobseeker’s Allowance or New Deal Allowance, Working Tax Credit, Housing Benefit or Local Housing Allowance, Pension Credit, Carer’s Allowance, Council Tax Support, Income Related Employment and Support Allowance, Universal Credit): £8.50

Website

http://www.llc.leeds.ac.uk/public-engagement/spring-into-summer

Great Hall, University of Leeds

Cheap Energy vs. Clean Technology?

  • 18 June 2015 5:30-7:30pm

The often vociferous debate over fracking is largely conducted as a contrast between lower energy bills to benefit industry on the one hand, and risks to the environment on the other. But is there also a risk that a prolonged collapse in oil prices accompanying the accelerated exploitation of shale oil and shale gas through fracking will ultimately damage industry as well.

Could investment in the development of cleaner technologies suffer from a movement back into conventional fossil fuel technologies as a result of cheaper oil? What is the real logic of British policy today towards industry and energy? And is the global situation stable when viewed in geo-political terms? These controversial questions are investigated for the automotive industry and its changing relations with competing energy sources: oil, gas, bio-fuels, hydrogen, and nuclear.

Suitable for

  • Not suitable for children

Website

http://www.llc.leeds.ac.uk/public-engagement/spring-into-summer

Great Hall, University of Leeds

Edith Cavell

  • 22 June 2015 6-8pm

12 October 2015 marks the Centenary of the execution of the British nurse Edith Cavell, who was shot in Belgium during the First World War for her involvement in an escape network for British and French soldiers.
This interactive event will explore the historical context in which her execution took place, discussing the resistance movement in occupied Belgium. In addition, we will consider the different ways in which Edith Cavell has been represented and remembered since her death, particularly in films produced in the interwar period.
There will be an opportunity to examine and discuss a variety of different sources including memoirs, commemorative souvenirs, images, film and film posters.

Suitable for

  • Not suitable for children

Website

http://www.llc.leeds.ac.uk/public-engagement/spring-into-summer

Great Hall, University of Leeds

New Atheism: the dilemmas of taking on God

  • 25 June 2015 5:30-7:30pm

Over the last ten years 'New Atheism' has made provocative contributions to public discussions of religion. Best-selling books by authors such as Richard Dawkins, Christopher Hitchens and Sam Harris have argued that religion has a malign impact on world affairs, provoking violent conflict, war and social division.

They contend that advances in science, textual analysis and other disciplines have produced overwhelming evidence against the claims of Christianity, Judaism and Islam. In this seminar we will review some of the key arguments of the New Atheist movement, and reflect upon why they have attracted both support and vociferous condemnation. In particular we will look at the political implications of New Atheism in areas such as education, security and gender.

We will consider the argument that authors such as Dawkins should be considered ‘secular fundamentalists’, and examine the dilemmas faced by atheists who seek to challenge the most influential types of monotheistic religion.

Suitable for

  • Not suitable for children

Website

http://www.llc.leeds.ac.uk/public-engagement/spring-into-summer

Great Hall, University of Leeds

The Fiction Makes Us Real: An Introduction to Canadian Literature

  • 1 July 2015 6-8pm

With special guest speaker Canadian writer Nicole Markotić.

Dr. Nicole Markotić is a poet (connect the dots, Minotaurs & Other Alphabets, Bent at the Spine), fiction writer (Yellow Pages, Scrapbook of My Years as a Zealot), and Canadian literature expert. Markotić will take us on a whirlwind introductory tour of Canadian literature and treat us to some readings from highlights of her own work and some other Canadian favourites.

Nicole’s trip to the UK has been funded by the Yorkshire Network for Canadian Studies, who are working in collaboration with the Lifelong Learning Centre to bring you new, exciting events: please come and join us for an entertaining, literary evening.

Refreshments will available 5.00 - 6.00pm for those who have registered.

Suitable for

  • Not suitable for children

Website

http://www.llc.leeds.ac.uk/public-engagement/spring-into-summer

Great Hall, University of Leeds

Celebrating Canada Day?

  • 1 July 2015 3-5pm

Canada Day is a Canadian public holiday marking the anniversary of July 1, 1867, when Canada became united as one single country within the British Empire. While it has become Canada’s national day, it remains a reminder to Canada’s troubled colonial history – a past which still affects present Canadian politics and everyday life.

In this event, experts from the Leeds Centre for Canadian Studies will explore the significance of Canada Day. Through mini-lectures, workshop discussion and short films we will examine a variety of issues and perspectives, including: multiculturalism, Anglophone and Francophone identities, indigenous histories and activism and the environment.

We will show Canada to be a unique, fascinating and vibrant nation, but also dig deeper to demonstrate it is not as peaceful and trouble-free as it might be perceived.

Suitable for

  • Not suitable for children

Website

http://www.llc.leeds.ac.uk/public-engagement/spring-into-summer

Great Hall, University of Leeds

From duck houses to eco housing: sustainable development at the University of Leeds

  • 2 July 2015 5:30-7:30pm

Speaker: Claire Bastin, Sustainability Service at the University of Leeds

At this FREE seminar Claire Bastin, Sustainability Manager at the University of Leeds, will discuss how the University is living up to its commitments by developing a project under the ‘Positive Partner in Society’ strategic theme. She will give real life examples of projects that staff and students at the University are involved with in the community and discuss their impact. The session will look at everything from creating new urban bio-diversity habitats, to supporting developments in eco-housing, to creating opportunities for students and local residents to work together on community development. Claire will also facilitate an open discussion and workshop exploring how members of the public can get involved with the work of the University and to think of ways in which the University can better engage with wider communities.

If you would like to find out more about how the University of Leeds is addressing its commitments to sustainable development across and beyond campus, or how you can get involved, please visit our sustainability website at http://sustainability.leeds.ac.uk/

Suitable for

  • Not suitable for children

Website

http://www.llc.leeds.ac.uk/events/from-duck-houses-to-eco-housing-the-impact-of-sustainable-development-at-the-university-of-leeds

Lifelong Learning Centre, University of Leeds
Woodhouse Lane
Leeds
LS2 9JT
England

Website

www.llc.leeds.ac.uk/public-engagement/spring-into-summer

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
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