William Booth Birthplace Museum

William Booth Birthplace Museum front of building
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The William Booth Birthplace Museum tells the story of the life and work of William Booth, Catherine Booth, their family and the legacy they left to the world – the founding of The Salvation Army – currently the largest provider of social care in the UK after the Government.

William Booth was born at 12 Notintone Place, 1829, the first of Booth’s several childhood homes. The museum comprises three Regency era terraced properties, the middle one – 12 Notintone Place - being the birthplace of William Booth. To reflect how the home may have looked when the young William Booth lived there, four of the rooms have been restored to their original Regency style. The other rooms contain displays containing personal effects of William and Catherine Booth and their family and objects that tell the story of the formation of The Salvation Army.

Visit the Museum where you can:
• Learn about Booth’s family and life in the Nottingham community which shaped his formative years
• Explore rooms where the Booth family lived
• View personal items from William and Catherine Booth and their children

Venue Type:

Museum, Historic house or home, Heritage site

Opening hours

By prior arrangement only and generally 10.00am - 4.00pm, Tuesday - Thursday. Occasionally other days and times may be arranged. Please contact the museum to arrange all access.

Admission charges

Free admission.

Getting there

The William Booth Birthplace Museum is about 1¼ miles east of Nottingham City Centre.

We are situated within the Salvation Army's William Booth Memorial Complex at 10-14 Notintone Place, Sneinton, Nottingham NG2 4QG. The museum is just across from Green's Windmill.

The entrance to the museum is through the metal gate on Notintone Place, near the junction of Sneinton Road and Notintone Street.

On foot: It's about a 15-minute walk from the city centre.

By car: If you're travelling by car the postcode for your sat nav is NG2 4QG. On street parking available near the Museum.

From M1 north: Leave the M1 at junction 26 and follow signs for A610. Once in the city centre, follow the signs for Greens Mill Centre and access the Sneinton area via Sneinton Road.

From M1 south: Leave the M1 at junction 24 and follow signs for the A453. Once in the city centre, follow the signs for Greens Mill & Science Centre and access the Sneinton area via Sneinton Road.

By train: It's about a 17-minute walk from Nottingham Station. The station is served by both local and national railway lines.

By bus: Route number 43 passes the Museum on Sneinton Road. For bus timetables and further information on getting public transport visit Traveline East Midlands (http://www.travelineeastmidlands.co.uk).

Additional info

Entrance: Access to the Museum from the front of the building is via a stepped entrance and also from the side of the building via a ramp entrance with an automatic door.

Facilities: Access around the building is via several staircases or via the platform lift with audio announcement, Braille and raised buttons. There is a recommended route around the museum, starting from the ground floor and progressing to the first and second floors.

Floor levels and galleries are numbered to ease route finding and large panel signage is used around the Museum.

An easy access toilet is located on the ground floor.

All assistance dogs are welcome.

Archival material and objects relating to William Booth, Catherine Booth, their family and The Salvation Army.

Collection details

Religion, Social History, Archives, Personalities

Events details are listed below. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all. For events that don't have a specific date see the 'Resources' tab above.
General William Booth Salvation Army

Lunchtime Talk: William Booth: His Life and Legacy

  • 8 July 2015 1-2pm

William Booth is best-known as the founder and first General of The Salvation Army, and as the author the best-selling book, In Darkest England and the Way Out, in which he outlined his programme of social reform for the ‘submerged tenth’, the poorest section of the community, published in 1890, the year in which his beloved wife Catherine died.

How did this boy, born in the Nottingham suburb of Sneinton in 1829, become a celebrity on the world stage by 1912, when he died at the age of 83?

We trace his life from his home and family in Sneinton, his conversion at the Wesley Chapel in Nottingham, his apprenticeship and employment as a pawnbroker’s assistant in Nottingham and London, his early Christian ministry in Lincolnshire, his service as a minister in the Methodist New Connexion, and his move to London in 1865, after several years as an independent evangelist.

We follow him through the formative years of his Christian Mission in East London, and its subsequent development into The Salvation Army, with an ever-widening circle of influence, as the movement spread around the world.

We review his life and work, and also how The Salvation Army has celebrated his life and kept alive his memory in the century since he died, and we also consider why Salvationists today are still drawing upon his legacy, a hundred years after he ‘laid down his sword’.

About the speaker:
Gordon Taylor is a lifetime Salvationist, with family roots going back to the early years of the movement when his great-grandparents became officers. He worked as archivist and historian at The Salvation Army International Heritage Centre, London, for more than 20 years until his retirement in 2011 and has completed a two-volume biography, William Booth: His Life and Legacy, to be published in October 2015.

Booking: Please note that places for this talk are limited. To reserve a place, please e-mail the Museum: wbbm@salvationarmy.org.uk or book online at: http://lunchtime-talk-william-booth.eventbrite.co.uk or call the Museum on 0115 979 3464.

Suitable for

  • Not suitable for children
William Booth General Salvation Army

Guided Walk: William Booth, son of Nottingham

  • 9 July 2015 1-2:30pm

See Nottingham through the eyes of William Booth, founder of The Salvation Army, walking past sites important in the life of the young William. Approx. 1 1/2 miles in length, walking approx. 1 hour, with a last stop at the William Booth Birthplace Museum for a museum tour ending at 2.30pm. Walk led by Tom Huggon, Nottingham Civic Society member and Council House tour guide.

Meet: in front of Nottingham Council House (between the lions), off Market Square, Nottingham

Fore more information contact the Museum on 0115 979 3464 or e-mail the Museum: wbbm@salvationarmy.org.uk

Suitable for

  • 18+
  • 16-17
  • 11-13
  • 14-15
Resources listed here may include websites, bookable tours and workshops, books, loan boxes and more. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all.

William Booth Birthplace Museum

Photo of the front of the William Booth Birthplace Museum

Creator

  • William Booth Birthplace Museum

Publisher

  • William Booth Birthplace Museum

Getting there

The William Booth Birthplace Museum is about 1¼ miles east of Nottingham City Centre.

We are situated within the Salvation Army's William Booth Memorial Complex at 10-14 Notintone Place, Sneinton, Nottingham NG2 4QG. The museum is just across from Green's Windmill.

The entrance to the museum is through the metal gate on Notintone Place, near the junction of Sneinton Road and Notintone Street.

On foot: It's about a 15-minute walk from the city centre.

By car: If you're travelling by car the postcode for your sat nav is NG2 4QG. On street parking available near the Museum.

From M1 north: Leave the M1 at junction 26 and follow signs for A610. Once in the city centre, follow the signs for Greens Mill Centre and access the Sneinton area via Sneinton Road.

From M1 south: Leave the M1 at junction 24 and follow signs for the A453. Once in the city centre, follow the signs for Greens Mill & Science Centre and access the Sneinton area via Sneinton Road.

By train: It's about a 17-minute walk from Nottingham Station. The station is served by both local and national railway lines.

By bus: Route number 43 passes the Museum on Sneinton Road. For bus timetables and further information on getting public transport visit Traveline East Midlands (http://www.travelineeastmidlands.co.uk).

William Booth Birthplace Museum
10-14 Notintone Place
Nottingham
Nottinghamshire
NG2 4QG
England

Website

William Booth Birthplace Museum

www.salvationarmy.org.uk/uki/wbbm

Facebook

www.facebook.com/williamboothbirthplacemuseum

Twitter

https://twitter.com/WmBoothMuseum

E-mail

Museum

wbbm@salvationarmy.org.uk

Museum Officer and Curator

julie.obermeyer@salvationarmy.org.uk

Telephone

Museum

0115 979 3464

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
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