British Academy

British Academy
10-11 Carlton House Terrace
London
Greater London
SW1Y 5AH
England

Website

www.britac.ac.uk/index.cfm

E-mail

press@britac.ac.uk

Telephone

020 7969 5200

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.

The British Academy is an independent national academy of Fellows elected for their eminence in research and publication. It is the UK's expert body that supports and speaks for the humanities and social sciences.

Venue Type:

Association or society

Opening hours

08:00 - 19:00.

Admission charges

There is no entry charge.

Exhibition details are listed below, you may need to scroll down to see them all.

Exhibition: 10 Carlton House Terrace – from Home to Hospital

  • 30 September — 30 November 2014

The current home of the British Academy was once the London residence of Lady Rosamond Ridley. This exhibition explores how Lady Ridley converted her grand family home into a hospital for wounded offers during the First World War.

Photographs, diaries and poems by soldiers and the women who volunteered to nurse them back to health illustrate how the house was transformed into a hospital, and tell personal stories of sacrifice and recuperation alongside tales of mischief and laughter

Admission

Free, please contact k.syrett@britac.ac.uk to book an appointment

Events details are listed below. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all. For events that don't have a specific date see the 'Resources' tab above.
photograph of wounded soldier on battlefield

War: An Emotional History

  • 11 May 2015 9:30am-5pm

This two-day conference seeks to explore the degree to which war impacted upon the emotional world of those who lived through times of conflict, and to consider how individuals in a range of different national contexts have responded to war from the medieval to the modern period.

Suitable for

  • Not suitable for children
  • 18+

Admission

Free.

Website

http://www.britac.ac.uk/events/2014/War_An_Emotional_History.cfm

Concert: Terrible Beauty: Music and Writing of the First World War

  • 11 November 2014 7:30-9pm

Out of the debris of the First World War emerged some of the most haunting literature and music of the twentieth century. Join performers and writers for an evening of songs, music and writings responding to the conflict from Great Britain and beyond.

With tenor Andrew Kennedy and poet-critic Angela Leighton FBA, among others.

Admission

Free, please register online: www.britishacademy.ac.uk/events

William Orpen, Zonnebeke

The Past Hovering: An Evening of War Poetry

  • 12 November 2014 6-7:30pm

he evening will feature readings by three distinguished poets – Michael Longley, Andrew Motion and Jon Stallworthy FBA – who over many years and in different forms have deeply engaged with the First World War and its poetry. The readings will feature poems from the time and their own works, including Longley’s The Stairwell and Stallworthy’s War Poet which are to appear in 2014. In course of the evening, Sir Andrew Motion will also receive this year’s Wilfred Owen Prize and discuss his relationship to Owen.

Speakers:

Michael Longley, poet, was the winner of the 2003 Wilfred Owen Poetry Award.
Sir Andrew Motion, poet & novelist, was Poet Laureate from 1999 to 2009.
Professor Jon Stallworthy FBA, poet, biographer, and literary scholar, is Senior Research Fellow at Wolfson College, Oxford and was winner of the 2010 Wilfred Owen Poetry Award.

Suitable for

  • Not suitable for children

Website

http://www.britac.ac.uk/events/2014/The_Past_Hovering.cfm

Photograph of parcels containing the effects of German soldiers killed in action.

The First World War: Literature, Culture, Modernity

  • 12 — 13 November 2014 9:30am-5pm

A hundred years after the war’s outbreak, this conference brings together some of the world’s leading experts and emerging scholars to reassess its literary and cultural impact and explore its vexed relationship to modernity.

Was the war a ‘crack in the table of history’ or did it reinforce deep continuities? What is the relationship between artistic form and historical violence, and between combatant and civilian creative responses? What are the colonial and transnational dimensions of First World War literature?

Suitable for

  • Not suitable for children
  • 18+

Admission

£50.00 / £20.00 Concessions

Website

https://www.britac.ac.uk/events/2014/The_First_World_War_Literature_Culture_Modernity.cfm

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