Finborough Theatre

Finborough Theatre

London's leading multi-award-winning Off West End theatre.

Venue Type:

Festivals

Opening hours

Please check for individual events.

Admission charges

Please check for individual events.

Getting there

The Finborough Theatre is located above The Finborough Arms, 118 Finborough Road, London SW10 9ED
Earl’s Court (District and Piccadilly Lines). Turn left from the Warwick Road exit, the theatre is five minutes walk straight along the road.
West Brompton (District Line and National Rail)
Buses 11, 14, 22, 74, 190, 328, C1, C3
Limited on-street parking in surrounding streets.

Additional info

Please see our website at www.finboroughtheatre.co.uk for full information.

Theatre productions.

Collection details

Music, Performing Arts, World Cultures, Film and Media, Literature, Personalities, Social History

Events details are listed below. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all. For events that don't have a specific date see the 'Resources' tab above.
Image It Is Easy To Be Dead

It Is Easy To Be Dead

  • 15 June — 9 July 2016

It Is Easy To Be Dead is based on the brief life and the ambivalent, ironic and profound letters and poetry of First World War poet, Charles Hamilton Sorley, combining the story of Sorley's life with music from some of the greatest composers of the period including George Butterworth, Dòmhnall Ruadh Chorùna, George Dyson, Ivor Gurney, John Ireland, Rudi Stephan, Francis Purcell Warren and Ralph Vaughan Williams.

Born in Aberdeen in 1895, Charles Hamilton Sorley was educated at Marlborough College, and was studying in Germany in 1914 when the First World War broke out. Briefly imprisoned as an enemy alien, he made his way back to England and enlisted in the Army. He was killed in action a year later. He was twenty years old.

Sorley is unique among the poets of the First World War. Chronologically, his life and work fits in with the patriotic idealism of such writers as Rupert Brooke (whom Sorley criticised for his "sentimental attitude"). Perhaps because of his time in Germany before the war, Sorley perceived the truth of the war long before his fellow writers, and anticipated the grim disillusionment of later poets such as Wilfred Owen, Isaac Rosenberg and Siegfried Sassoon.

Poets on Charles Sorley
"One of the three poets of importance killed during the war [alongside Wilfred Owen and Isaac Rosenberg]." – Robert Graves.
"Probably the most clear-sighted English poet killed in the war." – Robert Nichols.
"Potentially the greatest poet lost to us in that war...had Sorley lived, he might have become our greatest dramatist since Shakespeare" – John Masefield.
"Among the most remarkable of...the boy-poets killed in the war." – John Middleton Murry

Suitable for

  • 18+

Languages

  • Scottish Gaelic

Admission

Prices until 26 June – Tickets £16, £14 concessions, except Tuesday evenings £14 all seats, and Friday and Saturday evenings £16 all seats. Previews (15 and 16 June) £12 all seats.
£10 tickets for under 30s for performances from Tuesday to Sunday of the first week when booked online only.
£12 tickets for residents of the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea on Saturday, 18 June 2016 when booked online only.
Prices from 28 June – Tickets £18, £16 concessions, except Tuesday evenings £16 all seats, and Friday and Saturday evenings £18 all seats.

Website

http://www.finboroughtheatre.co.uk/productions.php

Resources listed here may include websites, bookable tours and workshops, books, loan boxes and more. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all.
I Wish To Die Singing book cover

I Wish To Die Singing - Voices from the Armenian Genocide

http://oberonbooks.com/die-singing

“Who, after all, today remembers the annihilation of the Armenians?” – Adolf Hitler, 1939

I Wish To Die Singing – Voices From The Armenian Genocide is a controversial documentary drama uncovering the forgotten secrets and atrocities of a denied genocide. Following several characters through these traumatic events, the play includes eye-witness reportage, images, music, poetry from Armenia's greatest poets, and verbatim survivors testimonies from one of the greatest historical injustices of all time.

The Armenian Genocide of 1915-16 was perpetrated by the Ottoman Turkish Government against the Armenians, a Christian minority in a Muslim state. Up to one and a half million people died. To this day, the Turkish government refuses to admit that genocide ever took place.

Creator

  • Neil McPherson

Publisher

  • Oberon Books

How to obtain

Copies are now available to order through the Oberon Books website

Getting there

The Finborough Theatre is located above The Finborough Arms, 118 Finborough Road, London SW10 9ED
Earl’s Court (District and Piccadilly Lines). Turn left from the Warwick Road exit, the theatre is five minutes walk straight along the road.
West Brompton (District Line and National Rail)
Buses 11, 14, 22, 74, 190, 328, C1, C3
Limited on-street parking in surrounding streets.

Finborough Theatre
118 Finborough Road
London
SW10 9ED
England

Website

www.finboroughtheatre.co.uk

E-mail

admin@finboroughtheatre.co.uk

Telephone

0844 847 1652

24 Hour Box Office

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
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