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Gasworks is a contemporary arts organisation in South London housing 12 artists' studios and presenting a programme of exhibitions, residencies, international fellowships and educational projects. Gasworks focuses on visual arts practice, working discursively with emerging UK-based and international artists towards the development of their work. Through its programme, Gasworks aims to contribute to the dissemination of contemporary arts practice to a wider audience. Gasworks is part of the Triangle Arts Trust's international network of artists and organisations.

Venue Type:

Artist studio or collective, Gallery

Opening hours

Wed-Sun 12-6pm or by appointment

Admission charges


Collection details

Decorative and Applied Art, Design, Film and Media, Fine Art, Photography

Exhibition details are listed below, you may need to scroll down to see them all.
Jamie Crewe, Cover design for Monsieur Venus

Jamie Crewe: Female Executioner

  • 26 January — 26 March 2017

A solo exhibition of newly commissioned video, print and sculpture by Glasgow-based artist Jamie Crewe. Focusing on French writer Rachilde’s controversial 1884 novel Monsieur Venus, the exhibition explores what happens when a queer, transfeminine artist tries to rehabilitate an historical work of fiction which seems to offer them ancestry.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly


Events details are listed below. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all. For events that don't have a specific date see the 'Resources' tab above.
Image 'A Body Reduced to Brilliant Colour', sculpture by Candice Lin.

Candice Lin: A Body Reduced to Brilliant Colour

  • 22 September — 11 December 2016 *on now

Gasworks presents A Body Reduced to Brilliant Colour, the first UK solo exhibition by American artist Candice Lin.

The exhibition explores how histories of slavery and colonialism have been shaped by human attraction to particular colours, tastes, textures and drugs. Lin presents a new commission, a living sculpture assembled from hacked household objects, which will work constantly to transform historically loaded goods such as tea and sugar into a new substance, a brownish -red fluid which will collect and congeal on the gallery floor throughout the exhibition.

Focusing on how the desire to wear, become enraptured by, or ingest certain plants and substances preceded the will to trade them as commercial goods, the exhibition traces the materialist urges at the root of colonial violence. Living processes, from fermentation to the generation of an electrical current through bacterial digestion, join with objects, organic matter and DIY mechanics to constitute a ritualistic act in which ceaseless movement echoes the histories of trade that entangle them.
Tubing, plastic and glass containers, porcelain filters, hot plates, and other household objects boil, ferment, distil, dye and pump liquid containing colonial trade goods such as cochineal, sugar and tea. The system created by these diverse elements surrounds a large, waterproof basin of Vitruvian proportions. ‘Fed’ two litres of water each day, this work – which the artist describes as a ‘flayed circulatory system’ – constantly produces a brownish-red fluid, which collects in the basin and is gradually siphoned off, congealing in a pool on a marble-effect laminate floor in the adjacent gallery. By transforming prized, historically-loaded goods into a stain reminiscent of murder, faeces or menstrual blood, the work speaks to these fraught histories of conquest, slavery, torture and theft, while at the same time exploring what happens when materials so burdened with history and meaning are situated in – and produce – new systems of relations.

A series of events accompanies the exhibition including The Intricate Speech of Intimate Objects on 24 Sept in which Los-Angeles based artist and psychic Asher Hartman will lead a demonstration and workshop in psychometry;and Eating the Edifice on 12 November 2016,an illustrated lecture/demonstration by food historian and artist Ivan Day which outlines the evolution of edible table art from the early Renaissance to the 19th century.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly


Free admission.


Noemí Pérez's installation 'El Tiempo del Lobo', comprised of a mound of 7 tons of coal, with model buildings emerging

Ethics and Ethnicity in Latin American Contemporary Art

  • 9 November 2016 From 7pm

In this presentation, titled ‘The Blood of History Doesn't Dry: Ethics and Ethnicity in Latin American Contemporary Art’, Guatemalan curator and political theorist Pablo José Ramírez will speak about Latin American artists operating in situations where enunciation is difficult or uncomfortable, or whose practices challenge dominant or official discourses.

Focusing on indigenous cultures, ideas of community and problems of language, rituals and borders, Pablo will discuss his previous curatorial projects, and his attempts to think up exhibition models that combine art objects with history writing and the specificities of artists’ material cultures.

Suitable for

  • 18+


Ivan Day's recent sugar sculpture, a nine-foot long palace showing the Greek sorceress Circe meeting Odysseus' men

Eating the Edifice

  • 12 November 2016 From 3pm

In this illustrated lecture/demonstration, food historian and artist Ivan Day outlines the evolution of edible table art from the early Renaissance to the 19th century. From gilded sugar coins distributed at 15th-century Italian wedding feasts to edible models of Victorian London omnibuses, edible table art has been of interest to people for hundreds of years. Day will introduce the materials, equipment, and moulds used by past masters of such edible ephemera and demonstrate how they were used.

Suitable for

  • Any age


155 Vauxhall Street
Greater London
SE11 5RH




(0)20 7587 5202


020 7582 0159

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.