TAP - Temporary Arts Project Ltd

TAP - Temporary Arts Project Ltd
The Old Waterworks, North Road
Westcliff-on-sea
Essex
SS0 7AB
England

Website

www.t-a-p.org.uk

E-mail

info@t-a-p.org.uk

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
TAP

TAP (Temporary Arts Project Ltd) is an independent artist led space sited in a Victorian water works that has been converted into artist studios, a project space and screening room.

Our core aim is to facilitate research and development for artists as well as provide opportunities for the production and presentation of new work.

Based in Southend-on-Sea, TAP is a not-for-profit organisation founded in 2008 by Amy McKenny and Emma Emmerton.

Venue Type:

Gallery, Artist studio or collective

Opening hours

Thursday/Friday 10am - 4pm
Saturday/Sunday 12pm - 5pm

Admission charges

ADMISSION FREE. Arrangements can be made to visit the gallery outside of the opening times via email. Please also visit our website www.t-a-p.org.uk for information on events and opportunities.

Exhibition details are listed below, you may need to scroll down to see them all.
Renee Vaughan Sutherland, 'Treatment' (2015), 16mm film still

Renee Vaughan Sutherland, Waterhouse

  • Until 7 June 2015 *on now
  • From 25 April 2015

Conceived and developed during Vaughan Sutherland’s residency at Metal, Southend, Waterhouse is a multi-film installation, incorporating live performance. The exhibition explores the different representations and perceptions of women in Essex through history, with a particular focus on the practices of witches and witchcraft during the 17th Century, and the gender and regionally specific slur ‘Essex Girl’.

Vaughan Sutherland’s multi-disciplinary work is concerned largely with the female body in landscape and context, provoking ideas about the extent to which land shapes us and how the body inflicts itself on the landscape. In Waterhouse Vaughan Sutherland presents the convergence of the Southend tides submerging and revealing, the ducking and trapping of witches and the muddying of the Essex female identity through generations of denunciation, which has simultaneously established an isolated and lesser class of these citizens.

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