The Mosaic Rooms

The Mosaic Rooms
226 Cromwell Road
London
Greater London
SW5 0SW
England

Website

www.mosaicrooms.org

E-mail

info@mosaicrooms.org

Telephone

020 7370 9990

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
The Mosaic Rooms Gallery, London

The Mosaic Rooms are an art gallery and bookshop in West London showcasing contemporary culture from and connected to the Arab World.

Our varied programme includes art and design exhibitions, film screenings, literary events, talks, performances and supper clubs. We work in partnership with leading cultural institutions and are proud to have been a part of London wide festivals such as Shubbak, Nour, London Design Festival and more. Admission to all of our exhibitions is FREE, as are most of our events. See what's coming up here: www.mosaicrooms.org

Event Hire: The Mosaic Rooms is available to hire for business meetings and a wide range of arts, corporate and private events. Find out about hiring The Mosaic Rooms here: www.mosaicrooms.org/venue-hire-details

The Mosaic Rooms Bookshop stocks celebrated and new writers from the Arab World, art books, and films, in both English and Arabic. Pop in during your visit or browse and buy titles online here: www.mosaicrooms.org/category/shop

Venue Type:

Gallery

Opening hours

Opening Times: Our exhibitions are open Tuesday – Saturday, 11am-6pm.

Admission charges

All of our exhibitions and many of our events are FREE.

Getting there

We are located on the junction of Earls Court Road and Cromwell Road, just 5 minutes walk from Earl's Court station (Earls Court Road exit). Plan your visit here: www.mosaicrooms.org/visit-us

Exhibition details are listed below, you may need to scroll down to see them all.
Tunisian Americans, 2012. Nadia Kaabi Linke. Photo credit Paolo Costa

The Future Rewound & The Cabinet of Souls

  • 10 October — 29 November 2014 *on now

The exhibition is formed in two parts, both inspired by the history of The Mosaic Rooms building, which more than a century ago, served as the domicile for Imre Kiralfy, the man responsible for many of the grand exhibitions at Earls Court, White City and Olympia. Kiralfy brought curiosities from all parts of the global empire to England, where the Victorian public was eager to view such spectacles. The exhibition reflects on these last hundred years and the structures of power that thread colonialism and capitalism, captivity and control, the observed and observing.

The lower gallery, ‘The Cabinet of Souls’, inverts the roles of spectators and objects and makes visible the ghostly shadows that influence social forces today. The display includes a new commission ‘Faces’, that obverts the politics of representation of tribes brought over for the “Savage South Africa” spectacle that formed part of Kiralfy’s Greater Britain Exhibition in 1899.

In the upper gallery, ‘The Future Rewound’ explores enduring methods of control in contemporary life, via works such as ‘No’ - a two-channel video installation which focuses on the rigorous visa process that people go through to enter the UK, and new installation ‘Perspective 1’ that refers to the recent financial crisis in London and challenges the omnipotent influence of capitalism.

Nadia Kaabi-Linke was born in 1978 in Tunis, her work has been exhibited internationally, including at recent solo shows in Europe, Hong Kong, India and the UAE. Her works are part of several public and private collections including that of MOMA, New York.

Suitable for

  • Any age

Website

http://www.mosaicrooms.org/nadia-kaabi-linke/

Events details are listed below. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all. For events that don't have a specific date see the 'Resources' tab above.
"Marina shot in 19th century"

Imre Kiralfy of Earl’s Court: from Showman to Impresario

  • 28 October 2014 7-8pm

Prior to the opening of our current exhibition, The Future Rewound & The Cabinet Of Souls, artist Nadia Kaabi-Linke asked The Mosaic Rooms to look into the history of the building. The building was discovered to be the former residence of Imre Kiralfy, the man responsible for many of the grand exhibitions at Earls Court, White City and Olympia during the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. Kiralfy brought curiosities from all parts of the global empire to England, where the Victorian public was eager to view such spectacles.

This discovery directly inspired Kaabi-Linke to produce the new commission, Faces, which responds to the “Savage South Africa” spectacle that formed part of Kiralfy’s Greater Britain Exhibition in 1899; and A Colour of Time which materialises the remnants left behind from Kiralfy’s time in the architecture of the building itself.

Brendan Gregory will talk about the man who lived here from 1896-1919 and the amazing breadth and ambition of his work. This talk will shed light on Kiralfy’s Victorian Earl’s Court exhibition center and the scale of it’s attractions, from the magnitude of its different sites; to the 50ft high painted backdrop and scenery that surrounded its periphery; to the attractions it comprised of like the themed boating lake, Canadian water chute and Ferris Wheel; to the Empress Theatre, the largest covered space in London aside from St Pancras Station. It will also look at the nine exhibitions and their accompanying spectacles devised by Kiralfy. The evening will reveal a fascinating history little known to today’s audiences.

Brendan Gregory has a Ph.D in Theatre Studies from University of Manchester, his thesis was on Kiralfy’s work. He has taught in various universities, including University of Manchester, Royal Holloway, University of London, and Denison University, Ohio. He co-authored Acts of Supremacy – The British Empire and the Stage 1790 – 1930.

This event is part of Nour Festival of Arts.

FREE, rsvp@mosaicrooms.org

Suitable for

  • Any age

Where

Leighton House
12 Holland Park Rd
London
W14 8LZ

Website

http://www.mosaicrooms.org/imre-kiralfy-of-earls-court-from-showman-to-impresario/

"African tribesman"

Exhibiting Africa

  • 4 November 2014 7-8pm

Through a series of short archival film screenings, Dr Tom Rice will chart and examine the varied uses of film in early twentieth century colonial exhibitions, looking in particular at on screen representations of Africa. This evening of screenings and discussion will offer a fascinating overview of these exhibitions and the mixed ways in which film figured in them.

As well as examining the use of film in colonial exhibitions of the twentieth century, the evening’s discussion will also offer greater insight into the issues raised in Kaabi-Linke’s new work Faces. This new commission references the Greater Britain Exhibition (1899) at Earls Court which featured a display entitled ‘Savage South Africa’. This display staged nearly 200 tribes people who were brought from South Africa to live in a representation of an African Village, a Kaffir Kraal. There is archival video footage of them arriving in in Southampton.

Dr Tom Rice has worked extensively on British colonial cinema and was the senior researcher on Colonial Film database. He is Director of Teaching/Lecturer in Film Studies at University of St Andrews, and has written articles and chapters in a number of publications.

FREE, rsvp@mosaicrooms.org

Suitable for

  • Any age

Where

Goethe-Institut
50 Princes Gate
Exhibition Road
London
SW7 2PH

Website

http://www.mosaicrooms.org/exhibiting-africa/

"Book discussion"

Time in the Shadows: Confinement in Counterinsurgencies

  • 14 November 2014 7-8pm

The Mosaic Rooms, supported by Free Word, are delighted to present Laleh Khalili who will discuss her new book which chronicles the detention and confinement, of both combatants and large groups of civilians, from colonial times to present day. Khalili will be in conversation with Guardian’s investigative reporter, Ian Cobain.

In Time in the Shadows, Laleh Khalili investigates the two major liberal counterinsurgencies of our day: Israeli occupation of Palestine and the U.S. War on Terror. In rich detail, the book investigates Abu Ghraib, Guantánamo Bay, CIA black sites, the Khiam Prison, and Gaza, among others, and links them to a history of colonial counterinsurgencies from the Boer War and the U.S. Indian wars, to Vietnam, the British small wars in Malaya, Kenya, Aden and Cyprus, and the French pacification of Indochina and Algeria. Khalili argues that whatever the form of incarceration—visible or invisible, offshore or inland, containing combatants or civilians—liberal states have consistently acted illiberally in their counterinsurgency confinements

Laleh Khalili is Reader in Middle East Politics at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. She is the author of Heroes and Martyrs of Palestine: The Politics of National Commemoration (2007) and coeditor of Policing and Prisons in the Middle East: Formations of Coercion (2010).

Ian Cobain has been a journalist for more than 30 years and is currently an investigative reporter with The Guardian. His work has included an examination of the UK’s involvement in the unlawful detention and mistreatment of detainees since September 2001 and in Iraq following the 2003 invasion. He has won the Martha Gellhorn Prize, the Paul Foot Award and a number of Amnesty International media awards, as well as a human rights award from Liberty and a Political Book Award.

FREE, rsvp@mosaicrooms.org

Suitable for

  • Any age

Where

Free Word Centre
60 Farringdon Road
London
EC1R 3GA

Website

http://www.mosaicrooms.org/time-in-the-shadows-confinement-in-counterinsurgencies/

"African tribesman"

Politics of Exhibiting

  • 19 November 2014 7-8pm

Join The Mosaic Rooms and Leighton House Museum for a special panel discussion on the politics of exhibiting. Comprising the panel are Henrietta Lidchi, Dr Nirmal Puwar, and Catherine Hahn.

A selection of the works in our current exhibition, The Future Rewound & The Cabinet Of Souls, aim to raise questions about the continuing influence of past social forces on methods of representation today, from colonial spectacles to present day museum archives.

This panel discussion will give further perspective to this, looking at the issues behind the politics of exhibiting other cultures. The speakers will talk on early colonial spectacles, living exhibits, museum collections and their construction of knowledge and truth, and issues of display and power. They will reference past and contemporary exhibitions and museums and raise questions about methods and approaches for display in the future.

Henrietta Lidchi is the Keeper of Department of World Cultures at National Museums Scotland and an anthropologist and curator. She has written on history of ethnographic displays.

Dr Nirmal Puwar is a senior lecturer at the Sociology Department at Goldsmiths University. She specializes in post colonialism, institutions & critical methodologies.

Catherine Hahn has written about the South African National Gallery (1930-2009).

FREE, rsvp@mosaicrooms.org

Suitable for

  • Any age

Where

Leighton House
12 Holland Park Rd
London
W14 8LZ

Website

http://www.mosaicrooms.org/politics-of-exhibiting/

"Screen shot from exhibition 'No'"

Artist Film Screening: Nadia Kaabi-Linke

  • 27 November 2014 6:30-8pm

Join The Mosaic Rooms and Iniva for a special screening and discussion about Nadia Kaabi-Linke’s video installation ‘NO’ which focuses on the rigorous visa process that people must go through to enter the UK.

‘NO’ is a two-channel video installation, presenting a dialogue in which a crowd, without power despite their numbers, opposes an individual voice of authority. On one screen an omnipotent faceless mouth voices the questions the UK border agency asks on the visa form. On the other, a choir of Tunisian citizens sings the responses to these demands for information. They are a group, yet they remain subject to the authoritarian voice and its investigation. The setting within an Anglican church draws parallels to the Holy Inquisition and the presumption of guilt without fair hearing.

The video piece was inspired by Kaabi Linke’s own experience but also in response to the recent uprisings in Tunisia which saw “many people fleeing from North Africa. The uprisings were motivated by an unanimous consent for more freedom, social fairness and economical wealth, but then, when the protests showed first signs of success, refugees from Tunisia and other parts of Africa used the gaps of the North African borders to searched freedom and wealth where it always was supposed to be, in Europe.”

The screening will be followed by a discussion with the artist and special guest about the process and experience of making this work.

FREE, rsvp@mosaicrooms.org

Suitable for

  • Any age

Where

Iniva
1 Rivington Place
London
EC2A 3BA

Website

http://www.mosaicrooms.org/artist-film-screening-nadia-kaabi-linke/

Getting there

We are located on the junction of Earls Court Road and Cromwell Road, just 5 minutes walk from Earl's Court station (Earls Court Road exit). Plan your visit here: www.mosaicrooms.org/visit-us

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