Brighton Science Festival

Brighton Science Festival 2016

Brighton Science Festival returns to prove there's a lot more to science than test tubes and prime numbers. Prepare to unleash your curiosity as science comes roaring out of the lab and into the city of Brighton & Hove for a month of hands-on demonstrations, engaging talks and live experiments.

Put aside any preconceptions you may have about science – every part of the Brighton Science Festival programme will challenge people's perceptions about what science is and who can do it. Roll up your sleeves and get stuck in – there are over 70 events to choose from. For full listings and to book tickets visit www.brightonscience.com.

Venue Type:

Campaign or initiative, Festivals, Science centre

Opening hours

Brighton Science Festival takes place all over Brighton throughout February. See website for more details.

Admission charges

Dependent on individual exhibitions and events. Please see website for more details.

Events details are listed below. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all. For events that don't have a specific date see the 'Resources' tab above.

Herding Hemingway’s Cats

  • 12 February 2016 From 7:30pm

Science presenters and real-life sisters, Dr Kat and Helen Arney, are back at the Brighton Science Festival with a new show after last year’s smash hit ‘How The Victorians Ruined The World’. The language of genes has become common in the media. We know they make your eyes blue, your hair curly or your nose straight. We’re told that genes control the risk of cancer, heart disease, alcoholism or Alzheimer’s. The cost of DNA sequencing has plummeted from billions of pounds to a few hundred, and gene-based advances in medicine hold huge promise. There are 2.2 metres of DNA inside every one of your cells, encoding roughly 20,000 genes. These are the ‘recipes’ that tell our cells how to make the building blocks of life, along with all the control switches ensuring they’re turned on and off at the right time and in the right place. But rather than a static string of genetic code, this is a dynamic, writhing biological library. With the help of cats with thumbs, fish with hips and wobbly worms, Dr Kat and Helen Arney will set aside their shared genetic quirks and sibling rivalry to unpack some of the mysteries in our DNA and explain the latest thinking about how our genes work.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

Where

Otherplace at The Basement

Admission

£8 / £6

Website

http://www.brightonscience.com/events/herding-hemingways-cats/

Bright Sparks

  • 13 — 14 February 2016 10am-5pm

Our ginormous weekend for families returns for its 12th year. Bright Sparks is a unique opportunity for parents and their children to share science with one another. From creepy crawlies to serious snot and from wicked wildlife to magnificent maths, there’s something to inspire, fascinate and thrill every young mind.

Suitable for

  • Especially for children

Where

Hove Park School
Nevill Road, Hove
East Sussex
BN3 7BN

Admission

£6 / Free for under 7s / £21 for family of 4

Website

http://www.brightonscience.com/events/tags/bright-sparks-weekend/

Inside “Inside Out”

  • 16 February 2016 7:30-9:30pm

The Pixar movie has been praised by psychologists for casting emotions as its lead performers. It is very brave to suggest we are ruled by our emotions, but how many emotions are there really: five, as in the film (Joy, Anger, Fear, Sadness and Disgust) or, as Dr Tiffany Watt-Smith claims, over 150? The psychologists of the University of Sussex must sort it out. This could be an emotional evening in a number of ways. Also probed: core memories, abstract reasoning, body language, earworms and imaginary friends.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

Where

Otherplace at The Basement

Admission

£6 / £3

Website

http://www.brightonscience.com/events/inside-inside-out/

Level Up Human - with Robin Ince

  • 17 February 2016 From 8pm

Join Simon Watt, Robin Ince, Jules Howard and Kat Arney for a live entertainment podcast panel show about human advancement and enhancement. Your life would be so much better if it had more tentacles and a prehensile face. but evolution has gotten lazy and needs a prod. Combining gene splicing and transhumanism, medical advancement and surgical enhancement, biology and ambition, Level Up Human takes a light hearted look at what it means to be human, and what the alternatives might be. The show is hosted by science writer and TV presenter Simon Watt and will be recorded live for an exciting new podcast series.

Suitable for

  • Not suitable for children

Where

Sallis Benney

Admission

£8 / £6

Website

http://www.brightonscience.com/events/level-up-human/

Festival of the Spoken Nerd vs Professor Elemental

  • 18 February 2016 8-10:30pm

This is a one-off Brighton Science Festival spectacular where science comedy phenomenon Festival of the Spoken Nerd (stand-up mathematician and schools favourite Matt Parker, science experiments maestro Steve Mould, and science songstress Helen Arney) join forces with local hero and Steampunk hip hop emcee Professor Elemental to create an explosive mix of music and science, live on stage! - See more at: http://www.brightonscience.com/events/festival-of-the-spoken-nerd-vs-professor-elemental/?preview_id=8813&preview_nonce=154fa203d2&preview=true#sthash.5aISf0QT.dpuf

Suitable for

  • Not suitable for children

Where

The Old Market

Admission

£12 / £10

Website

http://www.brightonscience.com/events/festival-of-the-spoken-nerd-vs-professor-elemental/

Pocket Science Festival

  • 20 February 2016 11am-4pm

A funfair with a twist. It looks like a funfair.
it IS a funfair, but each stall has a little science snuck into it, to surprise, inspire and educate. Created by BBC Rough Science’s Jonathan Hare and science showman Richard Robinson, director of the Brighton Science Festival. The Incredible Machine. The Amazing Shrinking Puppet Booth. Upside-down Goggles. Splat The Rat. Guess the Weights of the Cake, Tangrams, Microscopes, Illusions, Spaghetti Towers, Fun, Frights and Fabulosity.

Suitable for

  • Especially for children

Where

Brighton Youth Centre
64 Edward Street, Brighton
East Sussex
BN2 0JR

Website

http://www.brightonscience.com/events/pocket-science/

Play with your Food

  • 21 February 2016 11am-4pm

How do you make food? How do you taste food? Where do you taste food? How many tastes are there? How do your surroundings alter the taste? How can something be hot and cold at the same time? How can lemons taste sweet? The closer you get the darker it becomes. All these will be explored. On the lighter side you can make towers from spaghetti, ice cream using liquid nitrogen, funny shapes from vegetables, and watch some amazing demos using kitchen ingredients.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

Where

Sallis Benney

Admission

£2

Website

http://www.brightonscience.com/events/play-with-your-food/

Doping for Gold

  • 23 February 2016 7:30-9:30pm

‘Deterring sportspeople from risking their health, careers and lives’ At the upcoming Rio Olympics some athletes will be testing positive for drugs. Often the drugs are common and innocuous in normal use. But even mild drugs can have long-term harmful effects. And the temptation can be great. Tim Foster (second from left) won gold in the 2000 Olympics despite racking back pain, which often left him paralysed between races. He will discuss the temptations and abuses with Professor David Cowan OBE, Director of the Anti-Doping Science Centre at the last Olympic Games.

Suitable for

  • Not suitable for children

Where

Otherplace at The Basement

Admission

£6 / £3

Website

http://www.brightonscience.com/events/doping-for-gold/

Why Facebook Won't Get You Any More Friends

  • 24 February 2016 7-8:30pm

The rise of social media like Facebook brought with it the implicit promise of opening up new social vistas for us. By cutting through the limitations of the face-to-face world, you would be able to have thousands of friends scattered across the globe. But has the promissory note on the tin can turned out to be true? I shall try to convince you that it hasn’t. The reason lies in large part in the way we create our friendships: it seems that nothing substitutes for meeting face to face and seeing “the whites of their eyes”. Robin Dunbar is Professor of Evolutionary Psychology at the University of Oxford, and a Fellow of the British Academy. His research interests lie in the evolution of sociality, with particular reference to ungulates, primates and humans. He has been particularly interested in on the structure and dynamics of human social networks and their implications for community cohesion.

Suitable for

  • Not suitable for children

Where

Sallis Benney

Admission

£6 / £3

Website

http://www.brightonscience.com/events/facebook-wont-get-you-friends/

Because it's there!

  • 27 February 2016 7:30-8:30pm

When we set rockets off on their journeys to the Moon, or Mars, or the Space Station, or comets, we are using the same science as Isaac Newton revealed 330 years ago. What have we found out since then? With Darren Baskill of the University of Sussex, Richard Robinson, Festival director and Brad Gross of Blast Science, we demonstrate the science that got us out there, what is happening now and what we hope is left to discover. Space explorations are the ultimate journeys. And though it’s still expensive and dangerous for humans to go, robots can make the trips on our behalf, sending back astonishing information about the origins of our solar system, of ourselves and of our Universe. In this talk, we will be looking back at the history of space exploration, understanding how space craft get into space in the first place, and focusing on the journeys and latest discoveries made by two space probes in particular: New Horizons and Rosetta. On July 15th 2015, after almost 10 years and travelling 4.7 billion miles through space to the outer reaches of our solar system, New Horizons flew within just 8,000 miles of Pluto at 31,000mph, and will continue to send information back to Earth from that close encounter until November 2016. The Rosetta space probe took even longer to get to its primary destination – after 10 years, 5 months and 4 billion miles, Rosetta arrived at Comet Churyumov–Gerasimenko, and dropped a little probe called Philae, the size of a washing machine, onto the comet.

Suitable for

  • Not suitable for children

Where

Sallis Benney

Admission

£6 / £3

Website

http://www.brightonscience.com/events/because-its-there/

Big Science Weekend

  • 27 — 28 February 2016 9:30am-6pm

Our huge weekender is back with a full double dose of fascinating science from a vast variety of fields. How are memories created? How do animals navigate? Will AI ever Surpass I? Experts present their research in the theatre alongside a venue-full of stands from top universities, giving you a chance to put professors in the hot seat and get practical with interactive demos.

Suitable for

  • Not suitable for children

Where

Sallis Benney

Admission

£9 / £6

Website

http://www.brightonscience.com/events/tags/big-science-weekend/

Brighton Science Festival
18 Temple Street
Brighton
East Sussex
BN1 3BH
England

Website

www.brightonscience.com

E-mail

richard@brightonscience.com

Telephone

01273 777 628

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
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