Phoenix

Phoenix is a haven for world cinema, independent movies, film festivals and media arts, based in the heart of Leicester's cultural quarter.

Venue Type:

Gallery

Opening hours

Mon to Fri: 9.00 - 23.00
Sat & Sun: 10.00 - 23:00

Admission charges

All exhibitions are free of charge, fees vary for screenings and performances

Collection details

Design, Film and Media, Fine Art, Music, Performing Arts

Exhibition details are listed below, you may need to scroll down to see them all.
Animation of atoms occupy a science lab. Semiconductor - where shapes come from

Semiconductor - Where Shapes Come From

  • 10 February — 26 March 2017 *on now

Where Shapes Comes From is a moving image work co-commissioned by Phoenix and the EDP Foundation which considers how science translates nature, on an atomic scale.

Filmed in the mineral sciences laboratory at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History, a scientist goes about his daily work in rock and mineral preparatory labs; cutting up large meteorites and preparing mineral samples for scientific study. Accompanying this, mineralogist Jeff Post describes the coming together of atoms to form matter. He details formations of organised structures and patterns as if they are happening in real-time, in front of our eyes, transcending time and space.

Raw seismic data, collected from the land forming Mariana deep sea trench, has been converted directly into sound and controls computer generated animations, which are composited into the labs. They depict interpretations of visual scientific forms associated with atomic structures, and the technologies which capture them. Sitting alongside these animated formations are hand-made assemblages of discarded materials and other curiosities, which now bear human signatures. They unite in bringing a sense of playfulness and personal touch to the ordinarily rigorous framework of science. By combining these scientific processes, languages and products associated with matter formation in the context of the everyday, they become fantastical and strange encouraging us to consider how science translates nature and question our experiences of the physical world.

Filmed at the Mineral Sciences Laboratory, Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, Washington D.C. during its 100th year.
Audio made from Mariana Trench seismic data courtesy of the IRIS (Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology) Network.
Dialogue: Jeffrey E. Post, Geologist, Curator in Charge, Mineral Collection, Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, Washington D.C., U.S.A.
Scientist: Jonathon Cooper

http://semiconductorfilms.com/

Supported by Arts Council England.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

Website

http://www.phoenix.org.uk/event/semiconductor-where-shapes-come-from/

No Copyright Infringement Intended

No Copyright Infringement Intended

  • 7 April — 21 May 2017

No Copyright Infringement Intended is a group exhibition exploring the relationship between copyright and culture in the digital age, investigating how the concept of ownership and authorship is evolving and coming into conflict with outdated copyright and intellectual property laws.

Since the 1990s the internet has provided the opportunity for mass copying, redistribution and remixing of content – profoundly changing the way culture is produced and shared and sparking legal battles and debates that still rage on. Today, the increasing availability of technologies like 3D scanning and 3D printing have extended the ability to digitally copy and reproduce to the physical realm.

For many people now, mass sharing, copying and remixing seems like a natural form of self expression. Rather than embracing this change and using it to their advantage, rights holders and lawyers often resort to reinforcing outdated laws – penalising those who copy – and placing barriers on technology’s ability to share information and content freely.

Meanwhile, among artists there is widespread misunderstanding of copyright and how it affects their work. The phrase “No Copyright Infringement Intended” is often used as an attempt to avoid repercussions of copyright infringement. The phrase has no legal standing, but its widespread usage shows a lack of awareness of existing laws and the consequences of breaking them.

Featuring eight national and international artists working across a range of creative practices, the exhibition highlights the ongoing tension between production and copyright, considers the new artistic, social and political possibilities created through this tension and suggests new ways forward for artists, rights holders and the wider creative community.

The exhibition includes work by Nick Briz, Emilie Gervais, Nicolas Maigret, Christopher Meerdo, Jan Nikolai Nelles & Nora Al-Badri, Duncan Poulton, Fernando Sosa, Andrea Wallace & Ronan Deazley

Curated by Antonio Roberts, a new media artist and curator based in Birmingham. Kindly supported by Arts Council England

Suitable for

  • 18+

Website

http://www.phoenix.org.uk/event/no-copyright-infringement-intended/

Phoenix
4 Midland Street
Leicester
Leicestershire
LE1 1TG
England

Website

www.phoenix.org.uk

E-mail

Generic

hello@phoenix.org.uk

Telephone

Box Office

0116 242 2800

Administration

0116 242 2820

All information is drawn from or provided by the venues themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
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